Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet 

This six program series will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston’s image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960s, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

The series will run from March through June of 2017. See the other programs in the series

March

Boston Codfish Balls ad - Cooking Boston series Cooking Boston Cooking Boston: Refined to Rustic 15 March 2017.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Keith Stavely, Kelly Erby and moderator Barbara Wheaton Program 1: Refined to RusticKeith Stavely will explore the role Boston has played ...

Program 1: Refined to Rustic
Keith Stavely will explore the role Boston has played from being the home of early European refinement to the rise of the Colonial Revival rustic dishes. Kelly Erby will explore the role of restaurants and the rise of commercial dining in the increasingly urban landscape of nineteenth century Boston. Barbara Wheaton will lead a discussion on how the Hub has shaped American culinary culture through cookbooks and changing perceptions of the city.


Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet 

This series of programs will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston’s image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960s, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

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April
Cooking Boston Cooking Boston: Eating Other People's Food 27 April 2017.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Alex Prud'homme, Laura Shapiro, Stephen Chen and Moderator Megan Sniffin-Marinoff Program 2: Eating Other People's FoodIn the second half of the 20th century, ...

Program 2: Eating Other People's Food
In the second half of the 20th century, Americans were re-introduced to the food of the world. Most famously, Julia Child in Cambridge and James Beard in New York brought fine cooking into American living rooms. They were not alone in pushing the culinary envelope. In Cambridge, Design Research was making cookware fashionable and Joyce Chen was convincing Americans they could cook Mandarin cuisine. The expansion of the American palate that began with television chefs continued with restaurants across greater Boston and helped reshape the idea of dinner.


Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet 

This six program series will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston’s image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960s, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

The series will run from March through June of 2017. See the other programs in the series

More
May
Cooking Boston Cooking Boston: Where to Go 3 May 2017.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. James O'Connell, Corky White, Erwin Ramos and Moderator Peter Drummey Cooking Boston: Where to Go The great places and great personalities that put Boston on the map; ...

Cooking Boston: Where to Go

The great places and great personalities that put Boston on the map; looking at some of the big name restaurants like Anthony’s Pier 4, Locke-Ober’s, Jacob Wirth, to important innovators such as Tony Maws, Jim Koch, Chris Schlesinger, Lydia Shire, etc. to socially important neighborhood spots. 

The speakers include Jim O’Connell, author of Dining Out in Boston; Professor Corky White of Boston University; Erwin Ramos, former owner of Ole Restaurant Group; and MHS’s Peter Drummey. A display of historic menus will be available for this day only. 

Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet 

This six program series will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston’s image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960s, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

The series will run from March through June of 2017. See the other programs in the series

More
Cooking Boston Cooking Boston: Sweet Boston 18 May 2017.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Joyce Chaplin, Michael Krondl, Carla Martin and Moderator Gavin Kleespies Cooking Boston: Sweet Boston Joyce Chaplin, Michael Krondl, Carla Martin and ...

Cooking Boston: Sweet Boston

Joyce Chaplin, Michael Krondl, Carla Martin and moderator Gavin Kleespies

The Boston area has long had an unusually strong interest in sweets. As we see from the numerous ice cream establishments, the huge concentration of candy manufacturers, the near-manic obsession with doughnuts, and the flourishing of companies on the cutting edge of chocolate and the cacao trade, Boston has been, and remains, a pioneer of the sweeter things in life.

Panel: 

  • Joyce Chaplin, James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History, Harvard University Department of History
  • Michael Krondl, Author: The Donut: History, Recipes, and Lore from Boston to Berlin; Sweet Invention: A History of Desert; and The Taste of Conquest: The Rise and Fall of Three Great Cities of Spice
  • Carla Martin, the Founder and Executive Director of the Fine Cacao and Chocolate Institute and Lecturer, Harvard University Department of African American Studies 

Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet 

This six program series will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston’s image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960s, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

The series will run from March through June of 2017. See the other programs in the series


More
June
Cooking Boston Cooking Boston: Ice Kings 6 June 2017.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Gus Rancatore, Jeri Quinzio, and Judy Herrell   Cooking Boston: Ice Kings Gus Rancatore, Jeri Quinzio and Judy Herrell From the ice ...

 

Cooking Boston: Ice Kings

Gus Rancatore, Jeri Quinzio and Judy Herrell

From the ice harvesting business and Victorian ice cream parlors like Bailey’s to innovators like Steve’s, the Boston area has an unusual obsession with ice cream. Transplants from warmer parts of the country are often surprised to see ice cream shops still open— and full—on a frigid January night. Why is this area so devoted to ice cream and how have these institutions changed the country’s taste for frozen treats?

 

Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet

This six program series will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston's image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960's, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

This series will run from March through June of 2017.

More
Cooking Boston Cooking Boston: Final Courses 15 June 2017.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   This program will be held at Mount Auburn Cemetery. Space is limited. Docents of Mount Auburn Cemetery   Cooking Boston: Final Courses Join Mount Auburn docents for a walking tour of the cemetery ...

 

Cooking Boston: Final Courses

Join Mount Auburn docents for a walking tour of the cemetery to visit the graves of notable chefs, inventors, and confectioners. Mount Auburn is the final resting place of 19th-century cookbook author Fanny Farmer, chefs Joyce Chen and Gian Franco Romagnoli, chocolate makers Walter Baker and William Schrafft, hotel impresario Harvey Parker of Boston’s famed Parker House, and many more.

Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet

This six program series will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston's image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960's, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

The series will run from March through June of 2017.

More
More events
Cooking Boston Cooking Boston: Refined to Rustic 15 March 2017.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Keith Stavely, Kelly Erby and moderator Barbara Wheaton Boston Codfish Balls ad - Cooking Boston series

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

Program 1: Refined to Rustic
Keith Stavely will explore the role Boston has played from being the home of early European refinement to the rise of the Colonial Revival rustic dishes. Kelly Erby will explore the role of restaurants and the rise of commercial dining in the increasingly urban landscape of nineteenth century Boston. Barbara Wheaton will lead a discussion on how the Hub has shaped American culinary culture through cookbooks and changing perceptions of the city.


Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet 

This series of programs will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston’s image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960s, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

close
Cooking Boston Cooking Boston: Eating Other People's Food 27 April 2017.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Alex Prud'homme, Laura Shapiro, Stephen Chen and Moderator Megan Sniffin-Marinoff

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

Program 2: Eating Other People's Food
In the second half of the 20th century, Americans were re-introduced to the food of the world. Most famously, Julia Child in Cambridge and James Beard in New York brought fine cooking into American living rooms. They were not alone in pushing the culinary envelope. In Cambridge, Design Research was making cookware fashionable and Joyce Chen was convincing Americans they could cook Mandarin cuisine. The expansion of the American palate that began with television chefs continued with restaurants across greater Boston and helped reshape the idea of dinner.


Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet 

This six program series will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston’s image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960s, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

The series will run from March through June of 2017. See the other programs in the series

close
Cooking Boston Cooking Boston: Where to Go 3 May 2017.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. James O'Connell, Corky White, Erwin Ramos and Moderator Peter Drummey

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

Cooking Boston: Where to Go

The great places and great personalities that put Boston on the map; looking at some of the big name restaurants like Anthony’s Pier 4, Locke-Ober’s, Jacob Wirth, to important innovators such as Tony Maws, Jim Koch, Chris Schlesinger, Lydia Shire, etc. to socially important neighborhood spots. 

The speakers include Jim O’Connell, author of Dining Out in Boston; Professor Corky White of Boston University; Erwin Ramos, former owner of Ole Restaurant Group; and MHS’s Peter Drummey. A display of historic menus will be available for this day only. 

Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet 

This six program series will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston’s image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960s, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

The series will run from March through June of 2017. See the other programs in the series

close
Cooking Boston Cooking Boston: Sweet Boston 18 May 2017.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Joyce Chaplin, Michael Krondl, Carla Martin and Moderator Gavin Kleespies

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

Cooking Boston: Sweet Boston

Joyce Chaplin, Michael Krondl, Carla Martin and moderator Gavin Kleespies

The Boston area has long had an unusually strong interest in sweets. As we see from the numerous ice cream establishments, the huge concentration of candy manufacturers, the near-manic obsession with doughnuts, and the flourishing of companies on the cutting edge of chocolate and the cacao trade, Boston has been, and remains, a pioneer of the sweeter things in life.

Panel: 

  • Joyce Chaplin, James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History, Harvard University Department of History
  • Michael Krondl, Author: The Donut: History, Recipes, and Lore from Boston to Berlin; Sweet Invention: A History of Desert; and The Taste of Conquest: The Rise and Fall of Three Great Cities of Spice
  • Carla Martin, the Founder and Executive Director of the Fine Cacao and Chocolate Institute and Lecturer, Harvard University Department of African American Studies 

Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet 

This six program series will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston’s image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960s, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

The series will run from March through June of 2017. See the other programs in the series


close
Cooking Boston Cooking Boston: Ice Kings Please RSVP   registration required 6 June 2017.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Gus Rancatore, Jeri Quinzio, and Judy Herrell

 

Cooking Boston: Ice Kings

Gus Rancatore, Jeri Quinzio and Judy Herrell

From the ice harvesting business and Victorian ice cream parlors like Bailey’s to innovators like Steve’s, the Boston area has an unusual obsession with ice cream. Transplants from warmer parts of the country are often surprised to see ice cream shops still open— and full—on a frigid January night. Why is this area so devoted to ice cream and how have these institutions changed the country’s taste for frozen treats?

 

Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet

This six program series will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston's image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960's, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

This series will run from March through June of 2017.

close
Cooking Boston Cooking Boston: Final Courses Please RSVP   registration required 15 June 2017.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM This program will be held at Mount Auburn Cemetery. Space is limited. Docents of Mount Auburn Cemetery

 

Cooking Boston: Final Courses

Join Mount Auburn docents for a walking tour of the cemetery to visit the graves of notable chefs, inventors, and confectioners. Mount Auburn is the final resting place of 19th-century cookbook author Fanny Farmer, chefs Joyce Chen and Gian Franco Romagnoli, chocolate makers Walter Baker and William Schrafft, hotel impresario Harvey Parker of Boston’s famed Parker House, and many more.

Cooking Boston: How the Hub Shaped the American Diet

This six program series will explore the culinary history of Boston and the impact the city has had on the American diet. In the first half of the 19th century, Boston had a reputation as the center for European taste and refinement. By the end of the 19th century, the Colonial Revival movement nationally popularized foods like Boston baked beans and Yankee pot-roast shifting Boston's image from refined to rustic. In the 20th century, Boston clung to two identities: that of thrifty Puritans and of cosmopolitanism through education. This created some remarkably bland food but also made the city fertile ground for a culinary revolution. In the 1960's, chefs like Julia Child and Joyce Chen brought the flavors of the world to America through Boston.

The series will run from March through June of 2017.

close

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