October 2019
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Brown_Bags//7286_mark_work_lg.jpg Brown Bag, Research Fellow The Last & Living Words of Mark: Following the Clues to the Enslaved Man’s Life, Afterlife, and to his Community in Boston, Charlestown, and South Shore Massachusetts 16 October 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Catherine Sasanov, Independent Researcher Mark (1725-1755), a blacksmith, husband, and father, might have slipped from public memory if not ...

Mark (1725-1755), a blacksmith, husband, and father, might have slipped from public memory if not for his brutal end: his body gibbeted for decades on Charlestown Common for the poisoning of his enslaver, John Codman. This project, grounded in Mark’s testimony, approaches “legal” and other documents as crime scenes; attention to clues, connections, and seemingly insignificant details unlock important, previously unrecognized aspects of Mark’s world, thwarting their original intent: the enforcement of slavery’s status quo.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37//witch-publicdomain.jpg Brown Bag Inhuman Women and Puritanical Legacies in The VVitch 2015 30 October 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Amber Hodge, University of Mississippi The VVitch (2015) visualizes historical oppression as an origin for present-day ...

The VVitch (2015) visualizes historical oppression as an origin for present-day animalization and concordant disenfranchisement of women who operate outside of proscribed social norms. This talk connects MHS’s archives to The VVitch’s depiction of animality as both feminine and evil to demonstrate the legacy of patriarchal puritanism and possibilities for resistance.

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November 2019
Brown Bag Laboring Bodies: Dispossessed Women and Sexuality in Colonial New England 6 November 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Emily Clark, Johns Hopkins University This project will examine the intimate lives of enslaved, servant, and poor women using cases in ...

This project will examine the intimate lives of enslaved, servant, and poor women using cases in which their supposedly “deviant” bodies entered the historical record – in court cases, almshouse ledgers, and cheap print. Often overlooked in histories of New England, these women made up a crucial part of colonial society. Their bodies and labors (productive and reproductive) were used against their wills. Nonetheless, these sources reveal laboring women's everyday efforts to control their own bodies and sexualities.

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Brown Bag, Research Fellow The Last & Living Words of Mark: Following the Clues to the Enslaved Man’s Life, Afterlife, and to his Community in Boston, Charlestown, and South Shore Massachusetts this event is free 16 October 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Catherine Sasanov, Independent Researcher Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Brown_Bags//7286_mark_work_lg.jpg

Mark (1725-1755), a blacksmith, husband, and father, might have slipped from public memory if not for his brutal end: his body gibbeted for decades on Charlestown Common for the poisoning of his enslaver, John Codman. This project, grounded in Mark’s testimony, approaches “legal” and other documents as crime scenes; attention to clues, connections, and seemingly insignificant details unlock important, previously unrecognized aspects of Mark’s world, thwarting their original intent: the enforcement of slavery’s status quo.

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Brown Bag Inhuman Women and Puritanical Legacies in The VVitch 2015 this event is free 30 October 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Amber Hodge, University of Mississippi Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37//witch-publicdomain.jpg

The VVitch (2015) visualizes historical oppression as an origin for present-day animalization and concordant disenfranchisement of women who operate outside of proscribed social norms. This talk connects MHS’s archives to The VVitch’s depiction of animality as both feminine and evil to demonstrate the legacy of patriarchal puritanism and possibilities for resistance.

close

Brown Bag Laboring Bodies: Dispossessed Women and Sexuality in Colonial New England this event is free 6 November 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Emily Clark, Johns Hopkins University

This project will examine the intimate lives of enslaved, servant, and poor women using cases in which their supposedly “deviant” bodies entered the historical record – in court cases, almshouse ledgers, and cheap print. Often overlooked in histories of New England, these women made up a crucial part of colonial society. Their bodies and labors (productive and reproductive) were used against their wills. Nonetheless, these sources reveal laboring women's everyday efforts to control their own bodies and sexualities.

close


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