December

Brown Bag Ecology of Utopia: Environmental Discourse and Practice in Antebellum Communal Settlements 12 December 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Molly Reed, Cornell University During the 1840s, members of short-lived intentional communities debated strategies for &ldquo ...

During the 1840s, members of short-lived intentional communities debated strategies for “getting back to nature” and explored emerging meanings of “natural” through radical hygiene, diet, and agricultural practices. This talk examines how Transcendentalist and Fourierist communitarians articulated human-environment relationships in terms that reflected and informed their visions for social change.

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January
Brown Bag The Octopus’s Other Tentacles: The United Fruit Company, Congress, Dictators, & Exiles against the Guatemalan Revolution 9 January 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Aaron Moulton, Stephen F. Austin University With the 1954 U.S. government-backed overthrow of Guatemalan president Jacobo Arbenz, scholars have ...

With the 1954 U.S. government-backed overthrow of Guatemalan president Jacobo Arbenz, scholars have focused on ties between the State Department, the CIA, and el pulpo, the octopus, the United Fruit Company. This talk reveals how the Company's influence reached further to Boston-based congresspersons, Caribbean Basin dictators, and Guatemalan exiles.

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Brown Bag Superannuated: Old Age and Slavery’s Economy 30 January 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Nathaniel Windon, Pennsylvania State University Plantation owners demarcated elderly enslaved laborers as “superannuated” in their ...

Plantation owners demarcated elderly enslaved laborers as “superannuated” in their logbooks. This talk examines some of the implications of locating the origin of old age on the antebellum American plantation

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February
Brown Bag To Make a Breathing Picture: John Singleton Copley’s Disturbingly Vital Portraits in Enlightened Boston 6 February 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Caroline Culp, Stanford University This talk uncovers a peculiar desire of mid-18th century art: to make pictures so realistic they ...

This talk uncovers a peculiar desire of mid-18th century art: to make pictures so realistic they seemed to live and breathe. Focusing on Boston artist John Singleton Copley (1738-1815) and poet Phillis Wheatley (c. 1753-1784), among other cultural figures, it explores superstitious beliefs that lingered in an enlightened, empirical, and rational citizenry.

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March
Brown Bag A Meaningful Subjection: Coercive Inequality and Indigenous Political Economy in the Colonial Northeast 6 March 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Peter Olsen-Harbich, College of William and Mary This talk presents archaeological and documentary evidence of indigenous authority structures and ...

This talk presents archaeological and documentary evidence of indigenous authority structures and law enforcement in northeastern North America in the period immediately prior to European settlement. It then evaluates European comprehension of indigenous mechanisms of rule enforcement, and the degree to which awareness of them factored into designs for colonization.

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More events
Brown Bag Ecology of Utopia: Environmental Discourse and Practice in Antebellum Communal Settlements this event is free 12 December 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Molly Reed, Cornell University

During the 1840s, members of short-lived intentional communities debated strategies for “getting back to nature” and explored emerging meanings of “natural” through radical hygiene, diet, and agricultural practices. This talk examines how Transcendentalist and Fourierist communitarians articulated human-environment relationships in terms that reflected and informed their visions for social change.

close
Brown Bag The Octopus’s Other Tentacles: The United Fruit Company, Congress, Dictators, & Exiles against the Guatemalan Revolution this event is free 9 January 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Aaron Moulton, Stephen F. Austin University

With the 1954 U.S. government-backed overthrow of Guatemalan president Jacobo Arbenz, scholars have focused on ties between the State Department, the CIA, and el pulpo, the octopus, the United Fruit Company. This talk reveals how the Company's influence reached further to Boston-based congresspersons, Caribbean Basin dictators, and Guatemalan exiles.

close
Brown Bag Superannuated: Old Age and Slavery’s Economy this event is free 30 January 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Nathaniel Windon, Pennsylvania State University

Plantation owners demarcated elderly enslaved laborers as “superannuated” in their logbooks. This talk examines some of the implications of locating the origin of old age on the antebellum American plantation

close
Brown Bag To Make a Breathing Picture: John Singleton Copley’s Disturbingly Vital Portraits in Enlightened Boston this event is free 6 February 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Caroline Culp, Stanford University

This talk uncovers a peculiar desire of mid-18th century art: to make pictures so realistic they seemed to live and breathe. Focusing on Boston artist John Singleton Copley (1738-1815) and poet Phillis Wheatley (c. 1753-1784), among other cultural figures, it explores superstitious beliefs that lingered in an enlightened, empirical, and rational citizenry.

close
Brown Bag A Meaningful Subjection: Coercive Inequality and Indigenous Political Economy in the Colonial Northeast this event is free 6 March 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Peter Olsen-Harbich, College of William and Mary

This talk presents archaeological and documentary evidence of indigenous authority structures and law enforcement in northeastern North America in the period immediately prior to European settlement. It then evaluates European comprehension of indigenous mechanisms of rule enforcement, and the degree to which awareness of them factored into designs for colonization.

close

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