September

Brown Bag The Liberator’s Legacy: Memory, Abolitionism, and the Struggle for Civil Rights, 1865-1965 6 September 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Donald Yacovone, Harvard University The Liberator’s Legacy explores popular memory of William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick ...

The Liberator’s Legacy explores popular memory of William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, and their fellow abolitionists in the decades following the Civil War and reveals how that legacy influenced the rise of the modern Civil Rights Movement. Through the lens of collective memory, this book will examine the changing meaning of the Civil War in American thought.

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Brown Bag Exploring Conflict, Collaboration, and Conciliation in Colonial Families before the American Revolution 20 September 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Nina Sankovitch, Independent Researcher The Quincy, Adams, and Hancock families represent three different social classes all living in the ...

The Quincy, Adams, and Hancock families represent three different social classes all living in the small village of Braintree, MA before the American Revolution. This talk considers how the men and women of the families interacted, especially in their attitudes towards England in the late colonial era, and the different roles the families played in fomenting agitation against English rule.

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Brown Bag The Constitution of Disability in the Early United States 27 September 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Laurel Daen, MHS-NEH Fellow Disability emerged in the Early Republic as a meaningful bureaucratic, legal, institutional, and ...

Disability emerged in the Early Republic as a meaningful bureaucratic, legal, institutional, and cultural category. It was rooted in ideas about work, social worth, and economic independence and increasingly determined by the expert discourse of medicine. This project examines this development and considers its consequences for the new nation and its citizens.

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October
Brown Bag Commerce and the Material Culture of the Maritime Atlantic World 4 October 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM J. Ritchie Garrison, University of Delaware This talk considers the maritime economy in the early modern Atlantic World, focusing on the ...

This talk considers the maritime economy in the early modern Atlantic World, focusing on the infrastructure of commercial exchanges as port cities adapted to larger ships, increased consumer goods, and productivity challenges in environments that included bays, rivers, and estuaries. The argument is grounded on historical documents, maps, objects, and archaeological fieldwork to show that people—from dock workers to financiers—sought to stabilize local variables to accommodate rapid market shifts.

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Brown Bag Palatable Slavery: Food, Race, and Freedom in the British Atlantic, 1620-1838 18 October 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Heather Sanford, Brown University This project uses food in the British Atlantic to understand ideas about the body, race, and freedom ...

This project uses food in the British Atlantic to understand ideas about the body, race, and freedom. In New England, the Caribbean, and the Gold Coast of Africa, supplies of foodstuffs sustained colonization and slavery. Food allowed for survival, and also demarcated hierarchies of class, gender, and especially race. However, subjugated populations often used food-related practices to negotiate degrees of freedom within (and in defiance of) oppressive systems of colonization and slavery.

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More events
Brown Bag The Liberator’s Legacy: Memory, Abolitionism, and the Struggle for Civil Rights, 1865-1965 this event is free 6 September 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Donald Yacovone, Harvard University

The Liberator’s Legacy explores popular memory of William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, and their fellow abolitionists in the decades following the Civil War and reveals how that legacy influenced the rise of the modern Civil Rights Movement. Through the lens of collective memory, this book will examine the changing meaning of the Civil War in American thought.

close
Brown Bag Exploring Conflict, Collaboration, and Conciliation in Colonial Families before the American Revolution this event is free 20 September 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Nina Sankovitch, Independent Researcher

The Quincy, Adams, and Hancock families represent three different social classes all living in the small village of Braintree, MA before the American Revolution. This talk considers how the men and women of the families interacted, especially in their attitudes towards England in the late colonial era, and the different roles the families played in fomenting agitation against English rule.

close
Brown Bag The Constitution of Disability in the Early United States this event is free 27 September 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Laurel Daen, MHS-NEH Fellow

Disability emerged in the Early Republic as a meaningful bureaucratic, legal, institutional, and cultural category. It was rooted in ideas about work, social worth, and economic independence and increasingly determined by the expert discourse of medicine. This project examines this development and considers its consequences for the new nation and its citizens.

close
Brown Bag Commerce and the Material Culture of the Maritime Atlantic World this event is free 4 October 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM J. Ritchie Garrison, University of Delaware

This talk considers the maritime economy in the early modern Atlantic World, focusing on the infrastructure of commercial exchanges as port cities adapted to larger ships, increased consumer goods, and productivity challenges in environments that included bays, rivers, and estuaries. The argument is grounded on historical documents, maps, objects, and archaeological fieldwork to show that people—from dock workers to financiers—sought to stabilize local variables to accommodate rapid market shifts.

close
Brown Bag Palatable Slavery: Food, Race, and Freedom in the British Atlantic, 1620-1838 this event is free 18 October 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Heather Sanford, Brown University

This project uses food in the British Atlantic to understand ideas about the body, race, and freedom. In New England, the Caribbean, and the Gold Coast of Africa, supplies of foodstuffs sustained colonization and slavery. Food allowed for survival, and also demarcated hierarchies of class, gender, and especially race. However, subjugated populations often used food-related practices to negotiate degrees of freedom within (and in defiance of) oppressive systems of colonization and slavery.

close

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