Brown Bags

Extended
to May 26

Exhibition

The Private Jefferson

Explore Jefferson’s complexity through select correspondence and writings including the Declaration of Independence, records of farming at Monticello, and his architectural drawings.

Details

May

Brown Bag Fear and Loathing at the Crystal Palace: the Failure of America's First World's Fair 4 May 2016.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Michael Zakim, Tel Aviv University and the Charles Warren Center Inspired by the spectacular success of London's Crystal Palace Exhibition of the Industry of All ...

Inspired by the spectacular success of London's Crystal Palace Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations in 1851, an enthusiastic group of New Yorkers hoped to repeat that achievement two years later and so position the New World firmly at the center of a new global economy. Instead, they ended up stoking ongoing American debate over the changing meaning of industry in these years of industrial revolution.

More
Brown Bag Getting Old in the Young Nation 11 May 2016.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Rebecca Brannon, James Madison University What was it like getting old in a nation self-defined as a young nation? This research considers ...

What was it like getting old in a nation self-defined as a young nation? This research considers changes in how old men in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries self-conceptualized their own aging process, and how others around them perceived their aging. The American Revolution’s embrace of youthfulness—epitomized in constant descriptions of the young nation, and in the young men who largely led the Revolution—undermined traditional assurances of respect for the aged.

More
Brown Bag The Lives of Textiles: Trading and Consuming Clothing, Fabrics and Apparel Accessories in French and British North America, 1720s-1770s 18 May 2016.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Sarah Templier, Johns Hopkins University This program will present an overview of Templier's dissertation research, which addresses how ...

This program will present an overview of Templier's dissertation research, which addresses how clothing and textiles, particularly valuable and exchangeable goods in the eighteenth-century Atlantic, circulated across social scale, through formal and informal channels of exchange.

More
Brown Bag "My principles for my government …are fixed," Declarations of Independence between Fathers and Sons in the Age of Revolution 20 May 2016.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Travis Jacquess, University of Mississippi Unlike their colonial counterparts who had a vested interested in keeping their sons close to home ...

Unlike their colonial counterparts who had a vested interested in keeping their sons close to home as a source of labor for the family farm or as an otherwise participant in the family business, fathers in the Revolutionary era emphasized their sons' individual achievement and development over communal interests. Jaquess argues that the spirit of independence, the  spirit of ’76 if you will, gave rise to the spirit of individualism, which was  passed from father to son as a natural product of their experience in the Revolution and their engagement in the new American Republic.

More
Brown Bag "For the Good of the Country": Captive Trade Networks in the Colonial Northeast, 1630-1763 25 May 2016.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Joanne Jahnke Wegner, University of Minnesota Between 1630 and 1763, multiple, intersecting captive trades developed in the colonial northeast as ...

Between 1630 and 1763, multiple, intersecting captive trades developed in the colonial northeast as Native Americans, the English, and the French competed for geo-political power in the northeastern borderlands. The captive trades that emerged and evolved did so in the broader context of settler colonialism, where captive bodies became fungible commodities circulated by individuals and corporate bodies for economic, social, or political gain. The development of these captive trades depended upon the commodification of captive peoples who were trafficked in the colonies, across imperial borders, and into the Atlantic world.

More
Brown Bag From the Partisan Press to the Political Procedural 27 May 2016.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Mary Hale, University of Illinois - Chicago This project considers  the development of a new post-Civil War genre of political novels ...

This project considers  the development of a new post-Civil War genre of political novels specifically by looking at Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner's The Gilded Age and Henry Adams's Democracy. It examines the way in which Twain and Adams turn to the novel after their experiences working as political journalists and how this move from the partisan press to the political novel enables them to imagine new forms of nonpartisan political activity.

More
June
Brown Bag The Slave South in the Far West: California, the Pacific, and Proslavery Visions of Empire, 1800-1865 1 June 2016.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kevin Waite, University of Pennsylvania Whereas most scholarship on slaveholding imperialism focuses on the Atlantic Basin, Waite argues ...

Whereas most scholarship on slaveholding imperialism focuses on the Atlantic Basin, Waite argues that Southerners pursued an empire within the Pacific world as well. By tracking both proslavery activity in California and Southerners' attempts to capture the Pacific trade, hiswork highlights the centrality of the Far West in the nation's road to disunion.

More
Brown Bag "A Just and Honest Valuation": Money and Value in Colonial America, 1690-1750 3 June 2016.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Katie Moore, Boston University The first half of the eighteenth century was a period of economic transformation for Britain&rsquo ...

The first half of the eighteenth century was a period of economic transformation for Britain’s North American colonies, during which colonial settlers were active agents in an increasingly complex Atlantic World of goods, credit, and labor. At the same time, colonists maintained traditional moral tenets and such social norms as communal obligation, economic fairness, and stewardship over the poor. In the face of widespread economic change, how did early Americans preserve their worldview? This project argues that colonists mediated economic change within existing moral and social frameworks by re-imagining the origins and nature of value as extrinsic, a conceptual shift reflected in their use of paper money.

More
Brown Bag Briton Hammon in the Archives 15 June 2016.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Zach Hutchins, Colorado State University Sharing new evidence from the British National Archives, Hutchins traces the circum-Atlantic ...

Sharing new evidence from the British National Archives, Hutchins traces the circum-Atlantic journey of Massachusetts resident Briton Hammon. The enslaved Hammon published a narrative of his travels in 1760, an account many have described as the first slave narrative. In the Narrative Hammon places himself at the nexus of global politics, a player in the War of Jenkin’s Ear, the Seven Year’s War, and the larger power struggle between Catholics and Protestants.

More
Brown Bag Freedom's Generation: Coming of Age in the Era of Emancipation 17 June 2016.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Ben Davidson, New York University This research traces the lives of the generation of black and white children, in the North, South, ...

This research traces the lives of the generation of black and white children, in the North, South, and West, who grew up during the Civil War era and were the first generation to come of age after the end of slavery. The project explores how young people across the nation learned persistent lessons carried into adulthood about complexities inherent in ideas and experiences of emancipation, and it assesses how these lessons were transformed in memory by the turn of the twentieth century.

More
July
Brown Bag Passing Transcendental: Harvard, Heresy, and the Modern American Origins of Unbelief 6 July 2016.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM David Faflik, University of Rhode Island Dismissed in some quarters as “infidels,” the so-called “transcendentalists&rdquo ...

Dismissed in some quarters as “infidels,” the so-called “transcendentalists” of greater Boston in the 1830s, 1840s, and 1850s articulated an alternative faith that was rooted in their principled commitments to liberal spiritual renewal, philosophical idealism, and social reform. However we reckon with transcendentalism today, in our current post-secular moment, we might take seriously the charge that the transcendentalists were indeed representative “infidels” in their day and in their way. Some would say New England’s historical transcendentalists were idiosyncratically spiritual; others would call them symptomatically secular. This project asks if we might also say that transcendentalism’s unique worldview constituted not only a kind of unorthodoxy, but outright unbelief. 

More
Brown Bag The Great Peace of 1670 and the Forgotten Corner of the Iroquois Confederacy's Eastern Door 13 July 2016.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Evan Haefeli, Texas A&M University In a little known treaty conference, the Iroquois made peace with the Hudson Valley tribes who had ...

In a little known treaty conference, the Iroquois made peace with the Hudson Valley tribes who had been allied with the southern New England Algonquians in a war with the Confederacy that for the New Englanders was not concluded until after King Philip’s War. The 1670 treaty is important for several reasons: it not only kept the New York Algonquians neutral during King Philip’s War, and thus abandoned their former allies, but it is the origin of the designation of the “Delaware” Indians (who did not yet exist as such) as “women” (a problematic term) that became so notorious in 18th century Pennsylvania. This project examines the origins of the treaty in the war against the Iroquois and the previously overlooked alliance between the Hudson Valley and New England Algonquians in the 1660s.

More
More events
Brown Bag Fear and Loathing at the Crystal Palace: the Failure of America's First World's Fair this event is free 4 May 2016.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Michael Zakim, Tel Aviv University and the Charles Warren Center

Inspired by the spectacular success of London's Crystal Palace Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations in 1851, an enthusiastic group of New Yorkers hoped to repeat that achievement two years later and so position the New World firmly at the center of a new global economy. Instead, they ended up stoking ongoing American debate over the changing meaning of industry in these years of industrial revolution.

close
Brown Bag Getting Old in the Young Nation this event is free 11 May 2016.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Rebecca Brannon, James Madison University

What was it like getting old in a nation self-defined as a young nation? This research considers changes in how old men in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries self-conceptualized their own aging process, and how others around them perceived their aging. The American Revolution’s embrace of youthfulness—epitomized in constant descriptions of the young nation, and in the young men who largely led the Revolution—undermined traditional assurances of respect for the aged.

close
Brown Bag The Lives of Textiles: Trading and Consuming Clothing, Fabrics and Apparel Accessories in French and British North America, 1720s-1770s this event is free 18 May 2016.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Sarah Templier, Johns Hopkins University

This program will present an overview of Templier's dissertation research, which addresses how clothing and textiles, particularly valuable and exchangeable goods in the eighteenth-century Atlantic, circulated across social scale, through formal and informal channels of exchange.

close
Brown Bag "My principles for my government …are fixed," Declarations of Independence between Fathers and Sons in the Age of Revolution this event is free 20 May 2016.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Travis Jacquess, University of Mississippi

Unlike their colonial counterparts who had a vested interested in keeping their sons close to home as a source of labor for the family farm or as an otherwise participant in the family business, fathers in the Revolutionary era emphasized their sons' individual achievement and development over communal interests. Jaquess argues that the spirit of independence, the  spirit of ’76 if you will, gave rise to the spirit of individualism, which was  passed from father to son as a natural product of their experience in the Revolution and their engagement in the new American Republic.

close
Brown Bag "For the Good of the Country": Captive Trade Networks in the Colonial Northeast, 1630-1763 this event is free 25 May 2016.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Joanne Jahnke Wegner, University of Minnesota

Between 1630 and 1763, multiple, intersecting captive trades developed in the colonial northeast as Native Americans, the English, and the French competed for geo-political power in the northeastern borderlands. The captive trades that emerged and evolved did so in the broader context of settler colonialism, where captive bodies became fungible commodities circulated by individuals and corporate bodies for economic, social, or political gain. The development of these captive trades depended upon the commodification of captive peoples who were trafficked in the colonies, across imperial borders, and into the Atlantic world.

close
Brown Bag From the Partisan Press to the Political Procedural this event is free 27 May 2016.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Mary Hale, University of Illinois - Chicago

This project considers  the development of a new post-Civil War genre of political novels specifically by looking at Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner's The Gilded Age and Henry Adams's Democracy. It examines the way in which Twain and Adams turn to the novel after their experiences working as political journalists and how this move from the partisan press to the political novel enables them to imagine new forms of nonpartisan political activity.

close
Brown Bag The Slave South in the Far West: California, the Pacific, and Proslavery Visions of Empire, 1800-1865 this event is free 1 June 2016.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kevin Waite, University of Pennsylvania

Whereas most scholarship on slaveholding imperialism focuses on the Atlantic Basin, Waite argues that Southerners pursued an empire within the Pacific world as well. By tracking both proslavery activity in California and Southerners' attempts to capture the Pacific trade, hiswork highlights the centrality of the Far West in the nation's road to disunion.

close
Brown Bag "A Just and Honest Valuation": Money and Value in Colonial America, 1690-1750 this event is free 3 June 2016.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Katie Moore, Boston University

The first half of the eighteenth century was a period of economic transformation for Britain’s North American colonies, during which colonial settlers were active agents in an increasingly complex Atlantic World of goods, credit, and labor. At the same time, colonists maintained traditional moral tenets and such social norms as communal obligation, economic fairness, and stewardship over the poor. In the face of widespread economic change, how did early Americans preserve their worldview? This project argues that colonists mediated economic change within existing moral and social frameworks by re-imagining the origins and nature of value as extrinsic, a conceptual shift reflected in their use of paper money.

close
Brown Bag Briton Hammon in the Archives this event is free 15 June 2016.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Zach Hutchins, Colorado State University

Sharing new evidence from the British National Archives, Hutchins traces the circum-Atlantic journey of Massachusetts resident Briton Hammon. The enslaved Hammon published a narrative of his travels in 1760, an account many have described as the first slave narrative. In the Narrative Hammon places himself at the nexus of global politics, a player in the War of Jenkin’s Ear, the Seven Year’s War, and the larger power struggle between Catholics and Protestants.

close
Brown Bag Freedom's Generation: Coming of Age in the Era of Emancipation this event is free 17 June 2016.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Ben Davidson, New York University

This research traces the lives of the generation of black and white children, in the North, South, and West, who grew up during the Civil War era and were the first generation to come of age after the end of slavery. The project explores how young people across the nation learned persistent lessons carried into adulthood about complexities inherent in ideas and experiences of emancipation, and it assesses how these lessons were transformed in memory by the turn of the twentieth century.

close
Brown Bag Passing Transcendental: Harvard, Heresy, and the Modern American Origins of Unbelief this event is free 6 July 2016.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM David Faflik, University of Rhode Island

Dismissed in some quarters as “infidels,” the so-called “transcendentalists” of greater Boston in the 1830s, 1840s, and 1850s articulated an alternative faith that was rooted in their principled commitments to liberal spiritual renewal, philosophical idealism, and social reform. However we reckon with transcendentalism today, in our current post-secular moment, we might take seriously the charge that the transcendentalists were indeed representative “infidels” in their day and in their way. Some would say New England’s historical transcendentalists were idiosyncratically spiritual; others would call them symptomatically secular. This project asks if we might also say that transcendentalism’s unique worldview constituted not only a kind of unorthodoxy, but outright unbelief. 

close
Brown Bag The Great Peace of 1670 and the Forgotten Corner of the Iroquois Confederacy's Eastern Door this event is free 13 July 2016.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Evan Haefeli, Texas A&M University

In a little known treaty conference, the Iroquois made peace with the Hudson Valley tribes who had been allied with the southern New England Algonquians in a war with the Confederacy that for the New Englanders was not concluded until after King Philip’s War. The 1670 treaty is important for several reasons: it not only kept the New York Algonquians neutral during King Philip’s War, and thus abandoned their former allies, but it is the origin of the designation of the “Delaware” Indians (who did not yet exist as such) as “women” (a problematic term) that became so notorious in 18th century Pennsylvania. This project examines the origins of the treaty in the war against the Iroquois and the previously overlooked alliance between the Hudson Valley and New England Algonquians in the 1660s.

close