June

Brown Bag Dis-Union: Disability and the U.S. Civil War 25 June 2018.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jean Franzino, Beloit College This talk will examine the emerging legal category of the “disabled” American at ...

This talk will examine the emerging legal category of the “disabled” American at the end of the nineteenth century in relation to the construction of disability in Civil War literature, broadly conceived. In texts ranging from hospital newspaper poetry to mendicant narratives sold for veterans’ financial support, representations of Civil War injury engaged shifting understandings of disability: from individual condition to evolving social class.

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Brown Bag The Gendering of Diaspora: Irish American Women Teachers and the Rise of the Irish American Elite, 1880‒1920 27 June 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Judith Harford, University College Dublin Focusing on the period 1880‒1920, the peak of Irish emigration to the United States, this talk ...

Focusing on the period 1880‒1920, the peak of Irish emigration to the United States, this talk examines the education, professional training and wider public activism of first-generation Irish American women teachers.

More
July
Brown Bag Disestablishing Virtue: Federalism, Religion, and New England Women Writers 11 July 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Gretchen Murphy, University of Texas at Austin This talk examines the religious expressions of 18th- and 19th-century female Federalist writers, ...

This talk examines the religious expressions of 18th- and 19th-century female Federalist writers, specifically Catharine Sedgwick, in the context of the Federalist commitment to public religion. Sedgwick’s 1824 novel Redwood looks to the French Revolution as a site of U.S. debate about role of religion in a republic, signaling her interest in her father’s earlier Federalism while staking her position in the Unitarian controversy of the early 1800s.

More
Brown Bag Notes on Phillis Wheatley: Prodigy, Poetics, and the Science of the Human, 1761-1800 13 July 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Camille Owens, Yale University This talk studies Phillis Wheatley’s significance to the history of black prodigy, focusing ...

This talk studies Phillis Wheatley’s significance to the history of black prodigy, focusing on Wheatley’s education as an enslaved child. It reconstructs Wheatley’s education in relation to early American philosophy and pedagogy of childhood, looking to primers, tract literature, and the influence of Locke. From there, it examines the often-cited (and likely fictionalized) “trials” of Phillis Wheatley—and to Jefferson’s Notes on Wheatley—to show the performance of authenticating and/or discrediting black intellect as a cultural tradition which Wheatley’s literary career inaugurated.

More
Brown Bag The End of War: The Wabanaki Struggle with New England, 1722-1727 25 July 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Ian Saxine, Alfred University This talk examines the Anglo-Wabanaki War of 1722-1727 in the American Northeast. It situates the ...

This talk examines the Anglo-Wabanaki War of 1722-1727 in the American Northeast. It situates the conflict as the final resolution of a half-century of imperial crisis in the region. The talk argues the limits of indigenous, colonial, and imperial power influenced the war’s outbreak, the fighting, and its resolution.

More
Brown Bag Maroon Ecologies: Albery Allson Whitman and the Place of Poetry 27 July 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Katherine McIntyre, Columbia University This talk follows the intertwining of race and ecology in Albery Allson Whitman’s 1884 The ...

This talk follows the intertwining of race and ecology in Albery Allson Whitman’s 1884 The Rape of Florida through an analysis of colonial cartographic practices. Using maps to examine the cartographic representation of swamps and other wetlands that permeate the boundary between land and water, this talk opens questions about the porous ecologies of maroon communities and the poetics that follow from such ecologies.

More
August
Brown Bag “The Sons of Britain”: Partisanship & the Origins of the American Revolution in New York City 1 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Christopher Minty, Adams Papers, Massachusetts Historical Society In 1775, New York City merchant Frederick Rhinelander told a friend, “if this province ever ...

In 1775, New York City merchant Frederick Rhinelander told a friend, “if this province ever fights, it will be for the King.” Yet Rhinelander’s reasons were not based on New Yorkers’ blind loyalty to George III or Great Britain. Instead, for him and many of his friends, loyalism was a tool to challenge political opponents.

More
Brown Bag Sensory Experiences of Daily Life at New England Hospitals for the Insane 6 August 2018.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Madeline Kearin, Brown University Despite their reputation as sites of abuse and neglect, 19th-century hospitals for the insane were ...

Despite their reputation as sites of abuse and neglect, 19th-century hospitals for the insane were originally envisioned as “technological marvels” that would solve the national mental health crisis. This talk examines how New England lunatic hospitals were designed to mobilize sensory experience to cure mental illness, and how these designs shaped patient experiences.

More
Brown Bag The World Becomes Round: Cultural and Commercial Connections between Bombay Parsis and Yankees, 1771-1861 8 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jennifer Rose, Claremont Graduate University This talk focuses on the commercial and cultural connections between New Englanders and Parsis in ...

This talk focuses on the commercial and cultural connections between New Englanders and Parsis in Bombay from the 1770s to the 1850s. Commercially, the Parsis began to act as agent-brokers for Massachusetts merchants in the late 1780s. But Parsi Zoroastrian religious ideas and rituals were already known to at least a few readers in New England by spring of 1772, when the first European translations of Zoroastrian texts were sent, at Benjamin Franklin’s recommendation, to the Redwood Athenaeum’s librarian.

More
Brown Bag The Octopus’s Other Tentacles: The United Fruit Company, Congress, Dictators, & Exiles against the Guatemalan Revolution 15 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Aaron Moulton, Stephen F. Austin University With the 1954 U.S. government-backed overthrow of Guatemalan president Jacobo Arbenz, scholars have ...

With the 1954 U.S. government-backed overthrow of Guatemalan president Jacobo Arbenz, scholars have focused on ties between the State Department, the CIA, and el pulpo, the octopus, the United Fruit Company. This talk reveals how the Company's influence reached further to Boston-based congresspersons, Caribbean Basin dictators, and Guatemalan exiles.

More
Brown Bag Re-categorizing Americans: Difference, Distinction, and Belonging in the Dillingham Commission (1907-1911) 22 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Sunmin Kim, Dartmouth College This talk traces how the federal government surveyed immigrants in the early-20th century and how ...

This talk traces how the federal government surveyed immigrants in the early-20th century and how such attempts helped solidify the racial boundary-making for the nation. By dissecting the tenuous connections between racist ideology, state power, and social science knowledge, this talk provides an empirical account of how categories such as race and ethnicity emerge from confusion and contradiction in knowledge production.

More
Brown Bag "A Brazen Wall to Keep the Scriptures Certainty": European Biblical Scholarship in Early America 24 August 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kirsten Macfarlane, University of Cambridge During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, European scholars made significant advances in the ...

During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, European scholars made significant advances in the historical and critical study of the Bible, often with highly controversial and factious results. This talk will examine how such exciting but potentially subversive European scholarship was received and transformed by its early American readers, through a close study of the books owned and annotated by seventeenth-century readers in New England and elsewhere.

More
More events
Brown Bag Dis-Union: Disability and the U.S. Civil War this event is free 25 June 2018.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jean Franzino, Beloit College

This talk will examine the emerging legal category of the “disabled” American at the end of the nineteenth century in relation to the construction of disability in Civil War literature, broadly conceived. In texts ranging from hospital newspaper poetry to mendicant narratives sold for veterans’ financial support, representations of Civil War injury engaged shifting understandings of disability: from individual condition to evolving social class.

close
Brown Bag The Gendering of Diaspora: Irish American Women Teachers and the Rise of the Irish American Elite, 1880‒1920 this event is free 27 June 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Judith Harford, University College Dublin

Focusing on the period 1880‒1920, the peak of Irish emigration to the United States, this talk examines the education, professional training and wider public activism of first-generation Irish American women teachers.

close
Brown Bag Disestablishing Virtue: Federalism, Religion, and New England Women Writers this event is free 11 July 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Gretchen Murphy, University of Texas at Austin

This talk examines the religious expressions of 18th- and 19th-century female Federalist writers, specifically Catharine Sedgwick, in the context of the Federalist commitment to public religion. Sedgwick’s 1824 novel Redwood looks to the French Revolution as a site of U.S. debate about role of religion in a republic, signaling her interest in her father’s earlier Federalism while staking her position in the Unitarian controversy of the early 1800s.

close
Brown Bag Notes on Phillis Wheatley: Prodigy, Poetics, and the Science of the Human, 1761-1800 this event is free 13 July 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Camille Owens, Yale University

This talk studies Phillis Wheatley’s significance to the history of black prodigy, focusing on Wheatley’s education as an enslaved child. It reconstructs Wheatley’s education in relation to early American philosophy and pedagogy of childhood, looking to primers, tract literature, and the influence of Locke. From there, it examines the often-cited (and likely fictionalized) “trials” of Phillis Wheatley—and to Jefferson’s Notes on Wheatley—to show the performance of authenticating and/or discrediting black intellect as a cultural tradition which Wheatley’s literary career inaugurated.

close
Brown Bag The End of War: The Wabanaki Struggle with New England, 1722-1727 this event is free 25 July 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Ian Saxine, Alfred University

This talk examines the Anglo-Wabanaki War of 1722-1727 in the American Northeast. It situates the conflict as the final resolution of a half-century of imperial crisis in the region. The talk argues the limits of indigenous, colonial, and imperial power influenced the war’s outbreak, the fighting, and its resolution.

close
Brown Bag Maroon Ecologies: Albery Allson Whitman and the Place of Poetry this event is free 27 July 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Katherine McIntyre, Columbia University

This talk follows the intertwining of race and ecology in Albery Allson Whitman’s 1884 The Rape of Florida through an analysis of colonial cartographic practices. Using maps to examine the cartographic representation of swamps and other wetlands that permeate the boundary between land and water, this talk opens questions about the porous ecologies of maroon communities and the poetics that follow from such ecologies.

close
Brown Bag “The Sons of Britain”: Partisanship & the Origins of the American Revolution in New York City this event is free 1 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Christopher Minty, Adams Papers, Massachusetts Historical Society

In 1775, New York City merchant Frederick Rhinelander told a friend, “if this province ever fights, it will be for the King.” Yet Rhinelander’s reasons were not based on New Yorkers’ blind loyalty to George III or Great Britain. Instead, for him and many of his friends, loyalism was a tool to challenge political opponents.

close
Brown Bag Sensory Experiences of Daily Life at New England Hospitals for the Insane this event is free 6 August 2018.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Madeline Kearin, Brown University

Despite their reputation as sites of abuse and neglect, 19th-century hospitals for the insane were originally envisioned as “technological marvels” that would solve the national mental health crisis. This talk examines how New England lunatic hospitals were designed to mobilize sensory experience to cure mental illness, and how these designs shaped patient experiences.

close
Brown Bag The World Becomes Round: Cultural and Commercial Connections between Bombay Parsis and Yankees, 1771-1861 this event is free 8 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jennifer Rose, Claremont Graduate University

This talk focuses on the commercial and cultural connections between New Englanders and Parsis in Bombay from the 1770s to the 1850s. Commercially, the Parsis began to act as agent-brokers for Massachusetts merchants in the late 1780s. But Parsi Zoroastrian religious ideas and rituals were already known to at least a few readers in New England by spring of 1772, when the first European translations of Zoroastrian texts were sent, at Benjamin Franklin’s recommendation, to the Redwood Athenaeum’s librarian.

close
Brown Bag The Octopus’s Other Tentacles: The United Fruit Company, Congress, Dictators, & Exiles against the Guatemalan Revolution this event is free 15 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Aaron Moulton, Stephen F. Austin University

With the 1954 U.S. government-backed overthrow of Guatemalan president Jacobo Arbenz, scholars have focused on ties between the State Department, the CIA, and el pulpo, the octopus, the United Fruit Company. This talk reveals how the Company's influence reached further to Boston-based congresspersons, Caribbean Basin dictators, and Guatemalan exiles.

close
Brown Bag Re-categorizing Americans: Difference, Distinction, and Belonging in the Dillingham Commission (1907-1911) this event is free 22 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Sunmin Kim, Dartmouth College

This talk traces how the federal government surveyed immigrants in the early-20th century and how such attempts helped solidify the racial boundary-making for the nation. By dissecting the tenuous connections between racist ideology, state power, and social science knowledge, this talk provides an empirical account of how categories such as race and ethnicity emerge from confusion and contradiction in knowledge production.

close
Brown Bag "A Brazen Wall to Keep the Scriptures Certainty": European Biblical Scholarship in Early America this event is free 24 August 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kirsten Macfarlane, University of Cambridge

During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, European scholars made significant advances in the historical and critical study of the Bible, often with highly controversial and factious results. This talk will examine how such exciting but potentially subversive European scholarship was received and transformed by its early American readers, through a close study of the books owned and annotated by seventeenth-century readers in New England and elsewhere.

close

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