Digital History Projects Seminar

The Digital History Projects Seminar at the MHS will introduce audiences to the inner workings of in-progress projects that depend on digital methods, such as the translation of analog primary sources to a digital format, the use of computational tools for research and analysis of historical data, and the creation of “publications” in any form of digital media to communicate with audiences. The series will emphasize engagement with archival source materials, and presentations will include works intended for academic scholarship and/or for public history. Attendees are encouraged to provide feedback, and presenters may occasionally recommend review of circulated materials before the session meeting.

 

Attendance is free and open to everyone. Subscribers who remit $25 for the year will receive early online access to any pre-circulated materials. Subscriptions also underwrite the cost of the series. Pre-circulated materials will be available to non-subscribers who have RSVP’d for a session on the day prior to the program. Subscribe to this seminar series and you will receive access to the seminar papers for SIX series: the Boston Seminar on African American History, the Pauline Maier Early American History Seminary, the Boston Seminar on Environmental History, the Boston Seminar on the History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality, the Boston Seminar on Modern American Society and Culture, and the Boston Seminar on the History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality. We recognize that topics frequently resonate across these four fields; now, mix and match the seminars that you attend!

Join us for an in-depth exploration of the latest scholarship. Subscribe

Join the mailing list today by emailing seminars@masshist.org.

November 2020
Digital History Seminar Data Prosopography and Archives of Violence in Nineteenth-Century Virginia 19 November 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Anelise Shrout, Bates College Comment: Robert K. Nelson, University of Richmond This project combines digital history methods with theories from critical archive studies to explore ...

This project combines digital history methods with theories from critical archive studies to explore the intersection of data, power, documentation and violence in antebellum Virginia. It explores these issues through a history of the First African Baptist Church (FABC) in Richmond, Virginia, which, in the years before the American Civil War, was a religious space open to both free and enslaved people of color, and simultaneously a site of surveillance and violence. This project combines quantitative analysis, interactive visualization and traditional historical narrative in order to tell the history of the FABC in new ways.

The Digital History Projects Seminar at the MHS invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
January 2021
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/Banner.jpg Digital History Seminar Excavating Egyptology: The Emma B. Andrews Diary Project 26 January 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Sarah Ketchley, University of Washington Jennifer Stertzer, University of Virginia The Nile travel diaries of Mrs. Emma B. Andrews are an important yet underutilized resource for the ...

The Nile travel diaries of Mrs. Emma B. Andrews are an important yet underutilized resource for the so-called “Golden Age” of Egyptian archaeology in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This paper will discuss the evolution of the Emma B. Andrews Diary Project (est. 2011), and the project’s processes for transcription, encoding, analysis and presentation in a digital format.

The Digital History Projects Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Digital History Seminar Data Prosopography and Archives of Violence in Nineteenth-Century Virginia 19 November 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Anelise Shrout, Bates College Comment: Robert K. Nelson, University of Richmond

This project combines digital history methods with theories from critical archive studies to explore the intersection of data, power, documentation and violence in antebellum Virginia. It explores these issues through a history of the First African Baptist Church (FABC) in Richmond, Virginia, which, in the years before the American Civil War, was a religious space open to both free and enslaved people of color, and simultaneously a site of surveillance and violence. This project combines quantitative analysis, interactive visualization and traditional historical narrative in order to tell the history of the FABC in new ways.

The Digital History Projects Seminar at the MHS invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Digital History Seminar Excavating Egyptology: The Emma B. Andrews Diary Project Register registration required at no cost 26 January 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Sarah Ketchley, University of Washington Jennifer Stertzer, University of Virginia Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/Banner.jpg

The Nile travel diaries of Mrs. Emma B. Andrews are an important yet underutilized resource for the so-called “Golden Age” of Egyptian archaeology in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This paper will discuss the evolution of the Emma B. Andrews Diary Project (est. 2011), and the project’s processes for transcription, encoding, analysis and presentation in a digital format.

The Digital History Projects Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close