Public Programs and Special Events

Exhibition

Turning Points in American History

10 June 2016 to 25 February 2017 Details

The MHS offers many engaging programs and special events.

December

Public Program Begin at the Beginning: A Plentiful country - Letters from Maine’s Thomas Gorges 3 December 2016.Saturday, 1:00PM - 3:00PM Please RSVP   Abby Chandler, University of Massachusetts, Lowell “The Country heer is plentiful,” Thomas Gorges wrote home to England from Maine, where ...

“The Country heer is plentiful,” Thomas Gorges wrote home to England from Maine, where he had been sent in 1641 to establish a government and legal system. Gorges’ forthright, vivid, and dynamic letters provide us with a unique window onto colonial New England just at a time when England was moving into civil war. Join Abby Chandler in exploring these rare first-hand accounts. 

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Public Program A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley 5 December 2016.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Jane Kamensky, Harvard     This bold new history recovers an unknown American Revolution as seen through the ...

 

 

This bold new history recovers an unknown American Revolution as seen through the eyes of Boston-born painter John Singleton Copley. Jane Kamensky masterfully untangles the web of principles and interests that shaped the age of America’s revolution. Copley’s prodigious talent earned him the patronage of Boston’s patriot leaders, including Samuel Adams and Paul Revere. But the artist did not share their politics, and painting portraits failed to satisfy his lofty artistic goals. An ambitious British subject who lamented America’s provincialism, Copley looked longingly across the Atlantic. When resistance escalated into all-out war, Copley was in London. The magisterial canvases he created there made him one of the towering figures of the British art scene: a painter of America’s revolution as Britain’s American War.

More
Public Program Slavery and Freedom in the Cradle of Liberty: An Exhibit of Objects and Documents from the Massachusetts Historical Society 6 December 2016.Tuesday, 10:15AM - 12:00PM Please RSVP   Andrew Robichaud & Students of HI 190, Boston University In this virtual exhibit, Boston University students in HI 190 (The History of Boston) will present ...

Broadside advertising adn 1854 anti-slavery rally in FraminghamIn this virtual exhibit, Boston University students in HI 190 (The History of Boston) will present more than twenty rare artifacts and documents from the archives of the Massachusetts Historical Society. From first editions of Phillis Wheatley’s poems and William Lloyd Garrison’s Liberator, to John Brown’s pistol—to documents and objects related to Boston’s famous fugitive slave cases—students will explore the contentious and powerful history of nineteenth-century Boston as its residents grappled with questions of slavery, freedom, and Civil War.

This event is open to the public.

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Winter trees Member Event, Special Event MHS Fellows and Members Holiday Party 7 December 2016.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM This event is open only to MHS Fellows and Members MHS Fellows and Members are invited to celebrate the season at the Society’s annual holiday ...

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to celebrate the season at the Society’s annual holiday party. Enjoy an evening of holiday cheer along with the annual tradition of reading the anti-Christmas laws. 

More
Public Program Building Old Cambridge: Architecture and Development 12 December 2016.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Susan Maycock and Charles Sullivan     Old Cambridge is the traditional name of the early settlement of Newtowne, which ...

 

 

Old Cambridge is the traditional name of the early settlement of Newtowne, which served briefly as the capital of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and then became the site of Harvard College. Building Old Cambridge traces the development of the neighborhood as it became a suburban community and bustling intersection of town and gown. The authors explore Old Cambridge’s architecture and development in the context of its social and economic history; the development of Harvard Square as a commercial center and regional mass transit hub; the creation of parks and open spaces; and the formation of a thriving nineteenth-century community of booksellers, authors, printers, and publishers that made Cambridge a national center of the book industry. Finally, they examine Harvard’s relationship with Cambridge and the community's often impassioned response to the expansive policies of successive Harvard administrations.

More
Public Program Nathaniel Bowditch and the Power of Numbers 14 December 2016.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Tamara Thornton, SUNY Buffalo     Tamara Plakins Thornton delves into the life and work of Nathaniel Bowditch (1773 ...

 

 

Tamara Plakins Thornton delves into the life and work of Nathaniel Bowditch (1773-1838), a man Thomas Jefferson once called a “meteor in the hemisphere.” Bowditch was a mathematician, astronomer, navigator, seafarer, and business executive whose Enlightenment-inspired perspectives shaped nineteenth-century capitalism while transforming American life more broadly. Fleshing out the multiple careers of Nathaniel Bowditch, this book is at once a lively biography, a window into the birth of bureaucracy, and a portrait of patrician life, giving us a broader, more-nuanced understanding of how powerful capitalists operated during this era and how the emerging quantitative sciences shaped the modern experience.

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More events
Public Program Begin at the Beginning: A Plentiful country - Letters from Maine’s Thomas Gorges Please RSVP   registration required at no cost 3 December 2016.Saturday, 1:00PM - 3:00PM Abby Chandler, University of Massachusetts, Lowell

“The Country heer is plentiful,” Thomas Gorges wrote home to England from Maine, where he had been sent in 1641 to establish a government and legal system. Gorges’ forthright, vivid, and dynamic letters provide us with a unique window onto colonial New England just at a time when England was moving into civil war. Join Abby Chandler in exploring these rare first-hand accounts. 

close
Public Program A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley registration required 5 December 2016.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Jane Kamensky, Harvard

 

 

This bold new history recovers an unknown American Revolution as seen through the eyes of Boston-born painter John Singleton Copley. Jane Kamensky masterfully untangles the web of principles and interests that shaped the age of America’s revolution. Copley’s prodigious talent earned him the patronage of Boston’s patriot leaders, including Samuel Adams and Paul Revere. But the artist did not share their politics, and painting portraits failed to satisfy his lofty artistic goals. An ambitious British subject who lamented America’s provincialism, Copley looked longingly across the Atlantic. When resistance escalated into all-out war, Copley was in London. The magisterial canvases he created there made him one of the towering figures of the British art scene: a painter of America’s revolution as Britain’s American War.

close
Public Program Slavery and Freedom in the Cradle of Liberty: An Exhibit of Objects and Documents from the Massachusetts Historical Society Please RSVP   registration required at no cost 6 December 2016.Tuesday, 10:15AM - 12:00PM Andrew Robichaud & Students of HI 190, Boston University

Broadside advertising adn 1854 anti-slavery rally in FraminghamIn this virtual exhibit, Boston University students in HI 190 (The History of Boston) will present more than twenty rare artifacts and documents from the archives of the Massachusetts Historical Society. From first editions of Phillis Wheatley’s poems and William Lloyd Garrison’s Liberator, to John Brown’s pistol—to documents and objects related to Boston’s famous fugitive slave cases—students will explore the contentious and powerful history of nineteenth-century Boston as its residents grappled with questions of slavery, freedom, and Civil War.

This event is open to the public.

close
Member Event, Special Event MHS Fellows and Members Holiday Party registration required at no cost 7 December 2016.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM This event is open only to MHS Fellows and Members Winter trees

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to celebrate the season at the Society’s annual holiday party. Enjoy an evening of holiday cheer along with the annual tradition of reading the anti-Christmas laws. 

close
Public Program Building Old Cambridge: Architecture and Development registration required 12 December 2016.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Susan Maycock and Charles Sullivan

 

 

Old Cambridge is the traditional name of the early settlement of Newtowne, which served briefly as the capital of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and then became the site of Harvard College. Building Old Cambridge traces the development of the neighborhood as it became a suburban community and bustling intersection of town and gown. The authors explore Old Cambridge’s architecture and development in the context of its social and economic history; the development of Harvard Square as a commercial center and regional mass transit hub; the creation of parks and open spaces; and the formation of a thriving nineteenth-century community of booksellers, authors, printers, and publishers that made Cambridge a national center of the book industry. Finally, they examine Harvard’s relationship with Cambridge and the community's often impassioned response to the expansive policies of successive Harvard administrations.

close
Public Program Nathaniel Bowditch and the Power of Numbers registration required at no cost 14 December 2016.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm. Tamara Thornton, SUNY Buffalo

 

 

Tamara Plakins Thornton delves into the life and work of Nathaniel Bowditch (1773-1838), a man Thomas Jefferson once called a “meteor in the hemisphere.” Bowditch was a mathematician, astronomer, navigator, seafarer, and business executive whose Enlightenment-inspired perspectives shaped nineteenth-century capitalism while transforming American life more broadly. Fleshing out the multiple careers of Nathaniel Bowditch, this book is at once a lively biography, a window into the birth of bureaucracy, and a portrait of patrician life, giving us a broader, more-nuanced understanding of how powerful capitalists operated during this era and how the emerging quantitative sciences shaped the modern experience.

close

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