October 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Jefferson_cropped.jpg Online Event Jefferson: Then and Now 29 October 2020.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Peter Onuf, University of Virginia and Annette Gordon-Reed, Harvard University The reputations of all of the founders have changed dramatically over the course of American history ...

The reputations of all of the founders have changed dramatically over the course of American history, none more than that of Thomas Jefferson. Historians Annette Gordon-Reed and Peter Onuf will discuss the implications of recent political and social developments for our image of the slave-owning author of the Declaration of Independence, emphasizing the importance of situating Jefferson in his own historical context for a better understanding of the history and future prospects of democracy in America.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

 

 

 

 

More
November 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/banner_draft_2.jpg Online Event Success to the Literary Society! Black Male Youth Organizing in Early Nineteenth-Century Boston 5 November 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Kabria Baumgartner, University of New Hampshire, Durham Comment: Elizabeth McHenry, New York University In 1841, a dozen or so African American male youth aged twelve to sixteen established the Young ...

In 1841, a dozen or so African American male youth aged twelve to sixteen established the Young Men’s Literary Society in Boston with the stated aim to promote intellectual growth. The very success of this endeavor laid bare the severe educational inequalities and inequities that African American youth faced in Boston’s public schools. In response, these youth organized for change. This paper traces their organizing efforts and describes how their skills in composition, penmanship, elocution, and the literary arts set the stage for the “overthrow of caste schools” in Boston in 1855.

The African American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/thumbnail_Marblehead_Jeremiah_Lee_House_1768_grand_stair.jpg Online Event A Treasury of Massachusetts House Museums and Local History Orgs: Part I: What is a House Museum 9 November 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program A conversation led by William Hosley, Terra Firma Northeast Massachusetts has more house museums and historical organizations than most states twice our size. ...
Massachusetts has more house museums and historical organizations than most states twice our size. In recent years there’s been a national conversation about the sustainability of house museums. Our presenter argues that this widespread, mostly small class of museums vary tremendously. While many of our community-based historical organizations preserve and present their collections in historic houses, a house museum is something different. We will hear from three outstanding organizations: The General Society of Mayflower Descendants, which operates The Mayflower Society House and The Mayflower Meetinghouse; the Jeremiah Lee Mansion at Marblehead Museum; and the Shaw Hudson House at Plainfield Historical Society. 

 

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/ehs_banner.jpg Online Event ‘Not to Us Chained’: Nature and the Radicalism of Sacco and Vanzetti 10 November 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Chad Montrie, UMass Lowell; Federico Paolini, Università della Campania L. Vanvitelli Comment: Avi Chomsky, Salem State University This paper brings a fresh perspective to the study of modern American environmental thought as well ...

This paper brings a fresh perspective to the study of modern American environmental thought as well as modern American radicalism by exploring the significance of nature in the lives and writing of anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, following a narrative arc from their formative years in different parts of the Italian countryside to their final years as dedicated revolutionaries confined to Massachusetts prisons.

The Environmental History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Online Event How We Go On: Three Lives of Persistence, Resistance, and Resilience 12 November 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Nicholas Basbanes; Kimberly Hamlin, Miami University; John Loughery Julie Dobrow, Tufts University The New England Biography Series begins with a discussion of three recent biographies, published ...

The New England Biography Series begins with a discussion of three recent biographies, published during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. As we know from the months of uncertainty we’ve all lived through so far, there are lessons about persistence, resistance and resilience to be learned from looking at the past. Tufts University professor Julie Dobrow, author of After Emily, will chair a panel featuring Nicholas Basbanes (Cross of Snow: A Life of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow), Kimberly Hamlin (Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener) and John Loughery (Dorothy Day: Dissenting Voice of the American Century) to explore how their subjects prevailed in times of personal tragedy and public dissent, and how the authors learned to apply the lessons of their subjects to their own trials and travails as writers.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Online Event A Treasury of Massachusetts House Museums and Local History Orgs: Part II: Authors Houses 16 November 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program A conversation led by William Hosley, Terra Firma Northeast Massachusetts is a famously literary culture. At the birth of the house museum movement in the late ...

Massachusetts is a famously literary culture. At the birth of the house museum movement in the late 19th century, authors’ houses were among the first to be preserved, notably John Greenleaf Whittier and now others like Emily Dickinson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Ralph Waldo Emerson and more. We will explore three outstanding authors’ houses and how they grapple with the challenges of audience engagement, preservation and interpretation.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Young_Patron_Party_111720/Bully_Boy_Distillers.jpg Online Event Young Patron Party: Embrace your inner nerd! 17 November 2020.Tuesday, 8:00PM - 9:00PM This is a virtual event. Hosted by Tori Bedford, reporter at GBH News and producer of the All Rev'd Up podcast Embrace your inner nerd and join us at our first annual Young Patron Party! Hosted by Tori ...

Embrace your inner nerd and join us at our first annual Young Patron Party!

Hosted by Tori Bedford, reporter at GBH News and producer of the All Rev'd Up podcast, this virtual event will feature a variety of entertaining activities. Join Bully Boy Distillers and Edgar B. Herwick III, host of the Curiosity Desk at GBH News, for lively cocktail-making demonstrations and engage in conversations with peer young patrons. The inaugural Rising History Maker Award will be presented to Dr. Karilyn Crockett, the City of Boston's first Chief of Equity.

Purchase pay-your-age tickets to receive advance cocktail recipes and automatic entry into door prize drawings. 

 

More
Online Event Penelope Winslow, Plymouth Colony First Lady: Re-Imagining a Life 18 November 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Michelle Marchetti Coughlin Historian Michelle Marchetti Coughlin explores the life of Plymouth Colony First Lady Penelope ...

Historian Michelle Marchetti Coughlin explores the life of Plymouth Colony First Lady Penelope Pelham Winslow, a woman of influence during the eventful years of Plymouth's existence, through wartime and the end of its independence. Tracking fragmentary records and traces of Penelope Winslow's material world, Coughlin illuminates the story of a long-forgotten historical figure and offers fresh insight into the experiences of women in early New England.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

 

More
Online Event Data Prosopography and Archives of Violence in Nineteenth-Century Virginia 19 November 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Anelise Shrout, Bates College Comment: Robert K. Nelson, University of Richmond This project combines digital history methods with theories from critical archive studies to explore ...

This project combines digital history methods with theories from critical archive studies to explore the intersection of data, power, documentation and violence in antebellum Virginia. It explores these issues through a history of the First African Baptist Church (FABC) in Richmond, Virginia, which, in the years before the American Civil War, was a religious space open to both free and enslaved people of color, and simultaneously a site of surveillance and violence. This project combines quantitative analysis, interactive visualization and traditional historical narrative in order to tell the history of the FABC in new ways.

The Digital History Projects Seminar at the MHS invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/Fall_2020/thumbnail_image005.jpg Online Event A Treasury of Massachusetts House Museums and Local History Orgs: Part III: Hidden Gems 23 November 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program A conversation led by William Hosley, Terra Firma Northeast Most of our 351 towns have a community-based historical organization. Many are volunteer-run. ...

Most of our 351 towns have a community-based historical organization. Many are volunteer-run. Collectively, they present and preserve the stuff and stories that make up our history - usually with an emphasis on local art, industries, and material culture. William Hosley has criss-crossed Massachusetts visiting them in every corner of the state, from Adams to Andover, Northampton to Nantucket. We will hear from three of what he calls gems - house museums and historicals with amazing stuff and stories, that fly a bit under the radar. They too are grappling with the usual challenges of audience engagement, preservation, and interpretation.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

 

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/Fall_2020/Power_of_Objects.jpg Online Event The Power of Objects in 18th-Century British America 30 November 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Jennifer Van Horn, University of Delaware Over the course of the eighteenth century, Anglo-Americans purchased an unprecedented number and ...

Over the course of the eighteenth century, Anglo-Americans purchased an unprecedented number and array of goods. Prof. Jennifer Van Horn investigates these diverse artifacts—from portraits and city views to gravestones, dressing furniture, and prosthetic devices—to explore how elite American consumers assembled objects to form a new civil society on the margins of the British Empire. In this interdisciplinary transatlantic study, artifacts emerge as key players in the formation of Anglo-American communities and eventually of American citizenship. This presentation is the second annual lecture in honor of President Emeritus Dennis Fiori in recognition of his leadership. This lecture is made possible by gifts from friends of the Society.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
December 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg Online Event Caribbean Connections – Panel Discussion 1 December 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Charlotte Carrington-Farmer, Roger Williams University; Casey Schmitt, Cornell University Comment: Ryan Quintana, Wellesley College This panel brings together the work of two historians investigating the Caribbean. Casey ...

This panel brings together the work of two historians investigating the Caribbean. Casey Schmitt’s paper explores the intersection of warfare and human trafficking in the 17th century. Unmet demand for enslaved labor in smaller markets coupled with near-constant warfare among major European powers in the region reinforced practices of raiding and captivity. Schmitt’s paper shows how the lure of seizing captives facilitated manning expeditions during wartime, and demonstrates the centrality of violence against enslaved communities to 17th-century warfare. Carrington Farmer’s paper explores why New England emerged as a breeding ground for horses in the eighteenth century, and how it came to dominate the equine trade to the West Indies. Whilst some of the horses that crossed the Atlantic were riding horses, many were destined for “the slavery of the draught” toiling crushing sugar.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/banner_draft_2.jpg Online Event Emancipation In America, Seen Through One Man's Dreadlocks 3 December 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Abigail Cooper, Brandeis University Comment: Kellie Carter Jackson, Wellesley College 1864. A ship leaves its New England port carrying a USCT regiment to fight Confederates on the ...

1864. A ship leaves its New England port carrying a USCT regiment to fight Confederates on the Louisiana front. But on the way, a showdown takes place when Pvt. John Green refuses his commanding officer's order to cut his hair, protesting that it was contrary to his religion. In the events that follow, a revealing picture of black self-assertion in the making of freedom emerges, one too often hidden by a Civil War master narrative. This paper tells John Green's story, and asks how we might look at emancipation differently when we view it through his dreadlocks.

The African American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/Fall_2020/3351howardbank_lg.jpg Online Event Bank Notes and Shinplasters: The Rage for Paper Money in the Early Republic 7 December 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Joshua R. Greenberg Before Civil War greenbacks and a national bank network established a uniform federal currency in ...

Before Civil War greenbacks and a national bank network established a uniform federal currency in the United States, loosely regulated banks saturated the early American republic with upwards of 10,000 unique and legal bank notes. Joshua R. Greenberg shows how ordinary Americans accumulated and wielded the financial knowledge required to navigate interpersonal bank note transactions and argues that the shift from state-regulated banks and private shinplaster producers to federally authorized paper money in the Civil War era led to the erasure of the skill, knowledge, and lived experience with banking that informed debates over economic policy.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Online Event Black Women’s Worlds in Antebellum America – A Panel Discussion 8 December 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Kelly Kean Sharp, Luther College; Alisha Hines, Wake Forest University Comment: Tiya Miles, Harvard University This panel considers the spatial and material worlds of Black women living in Antebellum America. ...

This panel considers the spatial and material worlds of Black women living in Antebellum America. Kelly Sharp’s work weaves together the thin documentary record with rich archaeological evidence to reconstruct the daily life and labor of women enslaved at the Nathaniel Russell House in Charleston, SC. Her paper exemplifies how house museums are beginning to incorporate the story of bondpeople in an authentic and transparent manner. Alisha Hines’s essay examines how enslaved and free black women negotiated power and place in the antebellum steamboat world. Hines argues that black women who were unmoored from plantation landscapes by way of the western rivers trouble prevailing tropes of gendered mobility and immobility that pervade scholarship on slavery in the United States.

The History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/Fall_2020/Turner_jacket.jpg Online Event They Knew They Were Pilgrims: Plymouth Colony and the Contest for American Liberty 14 December 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program John G. Turner, George Mason University Americans have been telling two very different stories about the Pilgrims. One is the tale of brave ...

Americans have been telling two very different stories about the Pilgrims. One is the tale of brave religious refugees who established Thanksgiving and democracy in the New England wilderness. The other is the story of unscrupulous invaders who betrayed their Indian allies, stole their land, and went to war against them. John G. Turner narrates a more complex history in They Knew They Were Pilgrims, tracing the contested meanings of liberty – and slavery – in the seven-decade history of Plymouth Colony.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Online Event Cross of Snow: A Life of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 16 December 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Nicholas A. Basbanes In Cross of Snow, Nicholas Basbanes reveals the life, the times, the work--the soul--of ...

In Cross of Snow, Nicholas Basbanes reveals the life, the times, the work--the soul--of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, a man who shaped the literature of a new nation with his countless poems, sonnets, stories, essays, translations, and whose renown was so wide-reaching that his deep friendships included Charles Dickens, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Julia Ward Howe, and Charles Sumner. Highlighting research materials from the MHS archive, Basbanes will frame Longfellow’s life and work in the context of 19th century literary Boston.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Online Event Jefferson: Then and Now Register registration required at no cost 29 October 2020.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Peter Onuf, University of Virginia and Annette Gordon-Reed, Harvard University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Jefferson_cropped.jpg

The reputations of all of the founders have changed dramatically over the course of American history, none more than that of Thomas Jefferson. Historians Annette Gordon-Reed and Peter Onuf will discuss the implications of recent political and social developments for our image of the slave-owning author of the Declaration of Independence, emphasizing the importance of situating Jefferson in his own historical context for a better understanding of the history and future prospects of democracy in America.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

 

 

 

 

close

Online Event Success to the Literary Society! Black Male Youth Organizing in Early Nineteenth-Century Boston Register registration required at no cost 5 November 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Kabria Baumgartner, University of New Hampshire, Durham Comment: Elizabeth McHenry, New York University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/banner_draft_2.jpg

In 1841, a dozen or so African American male youth aged twelve to sixteen established the Young Men’s Literary Society in Boston with the stated aim to promote intellectual growth. The very success of this endeavor laid bare the severe educational inequalities and inequities that African American youth faced in Boston’s public schools. In response, these youth organized for change. This paper traces their organizing efforts and describes how their skills in composition, penmanship, elocution, and the literary arts set the stage for the “overthrow of caste schools” in Boston in 1855.

The African American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Online Event A Treasury of Massachusetts House Museums and Local History Orgs: Part I: What is a House Museum Register registration required at no cost 9 November 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program A conversation led by William Hosley, Terra Firma Northeast Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/thumbnail_Marblehead_Jeremiah_Lee_House_1768_grand_stair.jpg
Massachusetts has more house museums and historical organizations than most states twice our size. In recent years there’s been a national conversation about the sustainability of house museums. Our presenter argues that this widespread, mostly small class of museums vary tremendously. While many of our community-based historical organizations preserve and present their collections in historic houses, a house museum is something different. We will hear from three outstanding organizations: The General Society of Mayflower Descendants, which operates The Mayflower Society House and The Mayflower Meetinghouse; the Jeremiah Lee Mansion at Marblehead Museum; and the Shaw Hudson House at Plainfield Historical Society. 

 

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Online Event ‘Not to Us Chained’: Nature and the Radicalism of Sacco and Vanzetti Register registration required at no cost 10 November 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Chad Montrie, UMass Lowell; Federico Paolini, Università della Campania L. Vanvitelli Comment: Avi Chomsky, Salem State University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/ehs_banner.jpg

This paper brings a fresh perspective to the study of modern American environmental thought as well as modern American radicalism by exploring the significance of nature in the lives and writing of anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, following a narrative arc from their formative years in different parts of the Italian countryside to their final years as dedicated revolutionaries confined to Massachusetts prisons.

The Environmental History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Online Event How We Go On: Three Lives of Persistence, Resistance, and Resilience Register registration required at no cost 12 November 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Nicholas Basbanes; Kimberly Hamlin, Miami University; John Loughery Julie Dobrow, Tufts University

The New England Biography Series begins with a discussion of three recent biographies, published during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. As we know from the months of uncertainty we’ve all lived through so far, there are lessons about persistence, resistance and resilience to be learned from looking at the past. Tufts University professor Julie Dobrow, author of After Emily, will chair a panel featuring Nicholas Basbanes (Cross of Snow: A Life of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow), Kimberly Hamlin (Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener) and John Loughery (Dorothy Day: Dissenting Voice of the American Century) to explore how their subjects prevailed in times of personal tragedy and public dissent, and how the authors learned to apply the lessons of their subjects to their own trials and travails as writers.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Online Event A Treasury of Massachusetts House Museums and Local History Orgs: Part II: Authors Houses Register registration required at no cost 16 November 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program A conversation led by William Hosley, Terra Firma Northeast

Massachusetts is a famously literary culture. At the birth of the house museum movement in the late 19th century, authors’ houses were among the first to be preserved, notably John Greenleaf Whittier and now others like Emily Dickinson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Ralph Waldo Emerson and more. We will explore three outstanding authors’ houses and how they grapple with the challenges of audience engagement, preservation and interpretation.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Online Event Young Patron Party: Embrace your inner nerd! Register registration required 17 November 2020.Tuesday, 8:00PM - 9:00PM This is a virtual event. Hosted by Tori Bedford, reporter at GBH News and producer of the All Rev'd Up podcast Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Young_Patron_Party_111720/Bully_Boy_Distillers.jpg

Embrace your inner nerd and join us at our first annual Young Patron Party!

Hosted by Tori Bedford, reporter at GBH News and producer of the All Rev'd Up podcast, this virtual event will feature a variety of entertaining activities. Join Bully Boy Distillers and Edgar B. Herwick III, host of the Curiosity Desk at GBH News, for lively cocktail-making demonstrations and engage in conversations with peer young patrons. The inaugural Rising History Maker Award will be presented to Dr. Karilyn Crockett, the City of Boston's first Chief of Equity.

Purchase pay-your-age tickets to receive advance cocktail recipes and automatic entry into door prize drawings. 

 

close

Online Event Penelope Winslow, Plymouth Colony First Lady: Re-Imagining a Life Register registration required at no cost 18 November 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Michelle Marchetti Coughlin

Historian Michelle Marchetti Coughlin explores the life of Plymouth Colony First Lady Penelope Pelham Winslow, a woman of influence during the eventful years of Plymouth's existence, through wartime and the end of its independence. Tracking fragmentary records and traces of Penelope Winslow's material world, Coughlin illuminates the story of a long-forgotten historical figure and offers fresh insight into the experiences of women in early New England.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

 

close

Online Event Data Prosopography and Archives of Violence in Nineteenth-Century Virginia Register registration required at no cost 19 November 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Anelise Shrout, Bates College Comment: Robert K. Nelson, University of Richmond

This project combines digital history methods with theories from critical archive studies to explore the intersection of data, power, documentation and violence in antebellum Virginia. It explores these issues through a history of the First African Baptist Church (FABC) in Richmond, Virginia, which, in the years before the American Civil War, was a religious space open to both free and enslaved people of color, and simultaneously a site of surveillance and violence. This project combines quantitative analysis, interactive visualization and traditional historical narrative in order to tell the history of the FABC in new ways.

The Digital History Projects Seminar at the MHS invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Online Event A Treasury of Massachusetts House Museums and Local History Orgs: Part III: Hidden Gems Register registration required at no cost 23 November 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program A conversation led by William Hosley, Terra Firma Northeast Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Fall_2020/Fall_2020/thumbnail_image005.jpg

Most of our 351 towns have a community-based historical organization. Many are volunteer-run. Collectively, they present and preserve the stuff and stories that make up our history - usually with an emphasis on local art, industries, and material culture. William Hosley has criss-crossed Massachusetts visiting them in every corner of the state, from Adams to Andover, Northampton to Nantucket. We will hear from three of what he calls gems - house museums and historicals with amazing stuff and stories, that fly a bit under the radar. They too are grappling with the usual challenges of audience engagement, preservation, and interpretation.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

 

 

close

Online Event The Power of Objects in 18th-Century British America Register registration required at no cost 30 November 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Jennifer Van Horn, University of Delaware Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/Fall_2020/Power_of_Objects.jpg

Over the course of the eighteenth century, Anglo-Americans purchased an unprecedented number and array of goods. Prof. Jennifer Van Horn investigates these diverse artifacts—from portraits and city views to gravestones, dressing furniture, and prosthetic devices—to explore how elite American consumers assembled objects to form a new civil society on the margins of the British Empire. In this interdisciplinary transatlantic study, artifacts emerge as key players in the formation of Anglo-American communities and eventually of American citizenship. This presentation is the second annual lecture in honor of President Emeritus Dennis Fiori in recognition of his leadership. This lecture is made possible by gifts from friends of the Society.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Online Event Caribbean Connections – Panel Discussion Register registration required at no cost 1 December 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Charlotte Carrington-Farmer, Roger Williams University; Casey Schmitt, Cornell University Comment: Ryan Quintana, Wellesley College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg

This panel brings together the work of two historians investigating the Caribbean. Casey Schmitt’s paper explores the intersection of warfare and human trafficking in the 17th century. Unmet demand for enslaved labor in smaller markets coupled with near-constant warfare among major European powers in the region reinforced practices of raiding and captivity. Schmitt’s paper shows how the lure of seizing captives facilitated manning expeditions during wartime, and demonstrates the centrality of violence against enslaved communities to 17th-century warfare. Carrington Farmer’s paper explores why New England emerged as a breeding ground for horses in the eighteenth century, and how it came to dominate the equine trade to the West Indies. Whilst some of the horses that crossed the Atlantic were riding horses, many were destined for “the slavery of the draught” toiling crushing sugar.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Online Event Emancipation In America, Seen Through One Man's Dreadlocks Register registration required at no cost 3 December 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Abigail Cooper, Brandeis University Comment: Kellie Carter Jackson, Wellesley College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/banner_draft_2.jpg

1864. A ship leaves its New England port carrying a USCT regiment to fight Confederates on the Louisiana front. But on the way, a showdown takes place when Pvt. John Green refuses his commanding officer's order to cut his hair, protesting that it was contrary to his religion. In the events that follow, a revealing picture of black self-assertion in the making of freedom emerges, one too often hidden by a Civil War master narrative. This paper tells John Green's story, and asks how we might look at emancipation differently when we view it through his dreadlocks.

The African American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Online Event Bank Notes and Shinplasters: The Rage for Paper Money in the Early Republic Register registration required at no cost 7 December 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Joshua R. Greenberg Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/Fall_2020/3351howardbank_lg.jpg

Before Civil War greenbacks and a national bank network established a uniform federal currency in the United States, loosely regulated banks saturated the early American republic with upwards of 10,000 unique and legal bank notes. Joshua R. Greenberg shows how ordinary Americans accumulated and wielded the financial knowledge required to navigate interpersonal bank note transactions and argues that the shift from state-regulated banks and private shinplaster producers to federally authorized paper money in the Civil War era led to the erasure of the skill, knowledge, and lived experience with banking that informed debates over economic policy.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Online Event Black Women’s Worlds in Antebellum America – A Panel Discussion Register registration required at no cost 8 December 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Kelly Kean Sharp, Luther College; Alisha Hines, Wake Forest University Comment: Tiya Miles, Harvard University

This panel considers the spatial and material worlds of Black women living in Antebellum America. Kelly Sharp’s work weaves together the thin documentary record with rich archaeological evidence to reconstruct the daily life and labor of women enslaved at the Nathaniel Russell House in Charleston, SC. Her paper exemplifies how house museums are beginning to incorporate the story of bondpeople in an authentic and transparent manner. Alisha Hines’s essay examines how enslaved and free black women negotiated power and place in the antebellum steamboat world. Hines argues that black women who were unmoored from plantation landscapes by way of the western rivers trouble prevailing tropes of gendered mobility and immobility that pervade scholarship on slavery in the United States.

The History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Online Event They Knew They Were Pilgrims: Plymouth Colony and the Contest for American Liberty Register registration required at no cost 14 December 2020.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program John G. Turner, George Mason University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/Fall_2020/Turner_jacket.jpg

Americans have been telling two very different stories about the Pilgrims. One is the tale of brave religious refugees who established Thanksgiving and democracy in the New England wilderness. The other is the story of unscrupulous invaders who betrayed their Indian allies, stole their land, and went to war against them. John G. Turner narrates a more complex history in They Knew They Were Pilgrims, tracing the contested meanings of liberty – and slavery – in the seven-decade history of Plymouth Colony.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Online Event Cross of Snow: A Life of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Register registration required at no cost 16 December 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Nicholas A. Basbanes

In Cross of Snow, Nicholas Basbanes reveals the life, the times, the work--the soul--of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, a man who shaped the literature of a new nation with his countless poems, sonnets, stories, essays, translations, and whose renown was so wide-reaching that his deep friendships included Charles Dickens, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Julia Ward Howe, and Charles Sumner. Highlighting research materials from the MHS archive, Basbanes will frame Longfellow’s life and work in the context of 19th century literary Boston.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close