April 2021
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/WGS_Banner.jpg Online Event Contesting Domesticity – a Panel Discussion 20 April 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Authors: Kwelina Thompson, Cornell University; Shoniqua Roach, Brandeis University; Laura Puaca, Christopher Newport University Comment: Allison Horrocks, Lowell National Historical Park The domestic realm has long captivated feminist scholars who have sought to understand the lives of ...

The domestic realm has long captivated feminist scholars who have sought to understand the lives of women and the workings of gender. How have women experienced, challenged, leveraged, and shaped the domestic? This panel will consider these questions and discuss the domestic as a contested site of constraint and possibility. Shoniqua Roach theorizes the meanings of black domesticity as a deeply fraught space marked by anti-black sentiment and yet full of insurgent potential. Kwelina Thompson explores the history of the La Leche League – a Catholic mothers group that organized to support breastfeeding mothers in the mid-twentieth century. Finally, Laura Puaca tells the story of the expansion of post-WWII vocational rehabilitation programs to include disabled homemakers in the US.

The History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/thumbnail_WATERGOAT-8-14.jpg Online Event Clean Water, Green Space, and Social Equity 22 April 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Karen Mauney-Brodek, Emerald Necklace Conservancy; Rep. Nika Elugardo; and Chris Reed, Harvard Graduate School of Design; moderated by Sarah Glazer This program is in partnership with the Muddy Water Initiative The chain of green spaces and waterways that comprise the Emerald Necklace park system is an ...

The chain of green spaces and waterways that comprise the Emerald Necklace park system is an invaluable urban oasis. Described as “the lungs of the city” this parkland and its rivers and ponds clean the city air, provide habitats for birds and other wildlife, and greatly improve quality of life for Boston residents. Our panel will explore the past, present, and future of this urban wild, beginning with Olmsted’s vision, through the lens of social equity and environmental justice.

Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/thumbnail_MWI-logo1.jpg

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/CAPOZZOLA_Bound_By_War_300dpi.jpg Online Event Bound by War: How the United States and the Philippines Built America's First Pacific Century 26 April 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Christopher Capozzola, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Ever since US troops occupied the Philippines in 1898, generations of Filipinos have served in and ...

Ever since US troops occupied the Philippines in 1898, generations of Filipinos have served in and alongside the US armed forces. Historian Christopher Capozzola reveals this forgotten history, showing how war and military service forged an enduring, yet fraught, alliance between Americans and Filipinos. As the US military expanded in Asia, American forces confronted their Pacific rivals from Philippine bases and Filipinos became crucial partners in the exercise of US power. Their service reshaped Philippine society and politics and brought hundreds of thousands of Filipino immigrants to America, including World War II veterans who fought a decades-long battle to win equitable rights to citizenship and veterans benefits. Drawing on research across the U.S. and Asia, Bound by War tells the epic story of the U.S. and the Philippines through the wars the two nations fought together.

 

 

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/MASC_Banner.jpg Online Event The “Other” Illegals: Unauthorized European Immigration to New York City and Boston in the 20th Century 27 April 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Authors: Danielle Battisti, University of Nebraska – Omaha; Carly Goodman, La Salle University Comment: Christopher Capozzola Since 1965, U.S. political and social discourse about immigration has been dominated by concerns ...

Since 1965, U.S. political and social discourse about immigration has been dominated by concerns over undocumented immigration, a legal and social category understood to apply almost exclusively to non-white immigrants. This panel will examine a now obscure part of twentieth century immigration history: the migration of unauthorized white Europeans. The session will complicate current understandings of the period to demonstrate that early in the twentieth century southern and eastern European immigrants were in fact stigmatized as “criminals” and “illegals.” However by mid-century, southern and eastern Europeans were able to draw upon their social and political capital to change public perceptions and state policies. Legal status provided relief from the threat of deportation or exclusion – and reinforced the racialized category of undocumented immigrant. These papers will bring the stories to light of these “other” illegal immigrants and reinsert them into the conversations and policy debates surrounding unauthorized immigration.

The Dina G. Malgeri Modern American Society & Culture Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paperLearn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/biography_banner.jpg Online Event Fashioning a Life: How Style Matters in Biography 29 April 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Caroline Weber, Barnard College; Channing Joseph, University of Southern California Moderator: Natalie Dykstra, Hope College Is fashion art or commerce? Frivolous or full of meaning? Is fashion evidence? This panel brings ...

Is fashion art or commerce? Frivolous or full of meaning? Is fashion evidence? This panel brings together Caroline Weber, author of Queen of Fashion: What Marie-Antoinette Wore to the Revolution and Proust’s Duchess, and Channing Joseph, whose forthcoming book recovers the untold story of formerly enslaved William Dorsey Swann, who became, in the 1880s, a progenitor of ballroom and drag culture. They will join moderator Natalie Dykstra, author of Clover Adams: A Gilded and Heartbreaking Life, and now at work on a biography of Isabella Stewart Gardner, in a conversation about the ways biographers use fashion to decode lives and historical contexts. 

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
May 2021
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/Booth_INVENTION_OF_MIRACLES_cover.jpg Online Event The Invention of Miracles: Language, Power, and Alexander Graham Bell's Quest to End Deafness 3 May 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Katie Booth in conversation with Jaipreet Virdi, University of Delaware Alexander Graham Bell is known as the inventor of the telephone, but as the son of a deaf woman and, ...

Alexander Graham Bell is known as the inventor of the telephone, but as the son of a deaf woman and, later, husband to another, his goal in life from adolescence was to teach the deaf to speak. And yet by the end of his life, despite his best efforts—or perhaps because of them—Bell had become the American Deaf community’s most powerful enemy. Katie Booth recounts the complicated tragedy of a brilliant young man who set about stamping out what he saw as a dangerous language: Sign. The book offers a heartbreaking look at how heroes can become villains and how good intentions are, unfortunately, nowhere near enough—as well as a powerful account of the dawn of a civil rights movement and the triumphant tale of how the Deaf community reclaimed their once-forbidden language.

 

 

 

 

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EAHS_banner.jpg Online Event Honoring Bernard Bailyn: A Master Historian, An Inspiring Teacher 4 May 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. with Mary Bilder, Boston College; Alison Games, Georgetown University; Jonathan Gienapp at Stanford University Moderator: Richard D. Brown, University of Connecticut This seminar honors the legacy and career of noted Harvard historian and MHS Life Trustee Bernard ...

This seminar honors the legacy and career of noted Harvard historian and MHS Life Trustee Bernard Bailyn. In his lengthy career, Prof. Bailyn explored and wrote about various areas in Early American history. Three leading historians will discuss Bailyn's influence on their respective sub-fields and on their own scholarship in this tribute to a master scholar and teacher.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Spring_2021/153725874_10157845056792724_6935599351028128157_o.jpg Online Event The First Reconstruction: Black Politics in America from the Revolution to the Civil War 17 May 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Van Gosse, Franklin and Marshall College It may be difficult to imagine that a consequential black electoral politics evolved in the United ...

It may be difficult to imagine that a consequential black electoral politics evolved in the United States before the Civil War, for as of 1860, the overwhelming majority of African Americans remained in bondage. Yet free black men, many of them escaped slaves, steadily increased their influence in electoral politics over the course of the early American republic. Despite efforts to disenfranchise them, black men voted across much of the North, sometimes in numbers sufficient to swing elections. Van Gosse offers a sweeping reappraisal of the formative era of American democracy from the Constitution's ratification through Abraham Lincoln’s election, chronicling the rise of an organized, visible black politics focused on the quest for citizenship, the vote, and power within the free states.

 

 

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/ConcordHC-IMG-0823.jpg Online Event Confronting Racial Injustice: The War on Drugs in Massachusetts: The Racial Impact of the School Zone Law and Other Mandatory Minimum Sentences 19 May 2021.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This is an online program Sen. William N. Brownsberger; Abrigal Forrester, Center for Teen Empowerment; Rahsaan D. Hall, ACLU of Massachusetts; Deborah A. Ramirez, Northeastern University School of Law; and moderator Hon. Sydney Hanlon In the 1980s, Massachusetts embraced the War on Drugs, enacting harsh mandatory minimum sentences ...

In the 1980s, Massachusetts embraced the War on Drugs, enacting harsh mandatory minimum sentences for nonviolent drug offenses. It took decades to confront the reality that, in addition to being ineffective and costly, mandatory minimums resulted in the pervasive and disproportionate incarceration of Black and Brown people. Panelists will discuss this troubling history, recent reforms, and the prospects for implementing drug policies that are effective, fair, and just.

Moderator:

Hon. Sydney Hanlon, Massachusetts Appeals Court

Speaker:

Sen. William N. Brownsberger, Second Suffolk & Middlesex District; Abrigal Forrester, Executive Director, Center for Teen Empowerment; Rahsaan D. Hall, Director of the Racial Justice Program, American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts; Deborah A. Ramirez, Professor, Northeastern University School of Law

Developed by the Northeastern University School of Law Criminal Justice Task Force, Confronting Racial Injustice is a free, five-part series hosted by the Massachusetts Historical Society and sponsored by a number of Boston-area organizations.

More
Online Event Of Thee I Sing: The Contested History of American Patriotism 26 May 2021.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Ben Railton, Fitchburg State University When we talk about patriotism in America, we tend to mean one form: the version captured in shared ...

When we talk about patriotism in America, we tend to mean one form: the version captured in shared celebrations like the national anthem and the Pledge of Allegiance. But as Ben Railton argues, that celebratory patriotism is just one of four distinct forms: celebratory, the communal expression of an idealized America; mythic, the creation of national myths that exclude certain communities; active, acts of service and sacrifice for the nation; and critical, arguments for how the nation has fallen short of its ideals that seek to move us toward that more perfect union. In Of Thee I Sing, Railton defines those four forms of American patriotism, using the four verses of “America the Beautiful” as examples of each type, and traces them across our histories.

 

 

More
June 2021
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/thumbnail_Stuart_Graphic_-_hands.jpg Online Event Confronting Racial Injustice: The Charles Stuart Story: White Lies and Black Lives 9 June 2021.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This is an online program Angela Onwuachi-Willig, Dean, Boston University School of Law; Hon. Leslie Harris (ret.), Suffolk Juvenile Court; Renée Graham, Columnist, The Boston Globe; moderated by Kim McLaurin, Associate Dean, Suffolk University Law School Charles Stuart, a white man, murdered his wife and unborn child in Boston in 1989 and falsely blamed ...

Charles Stuart, a white man, murdered his wife and unborn child in Boston in 1989 and falsely blamed the attack on a nonexistent Black man. Believing Stuart’s lie, the police engaged in a massive manhunt that terrorized a Black community in Mission Hill with detention, public strip-searches, and the arrest of two innocent men. As some lawmakers demanded the death penalty, the media perpetuated this false story. The Stuart case exemplifies how the narrative of white supremacy continues to lead to the dehumanization and devaluation of Black lives. Widespread acceptance of white lies over Black lives persists today.

Developed by the Northeastern University School of Law Criminal Justice Task Force, Confronting Racial Injustice is a free, five-part series hosted by the Massachusetts Historical Society and sponsored by a number of Boston-area organizations.

 

 

 

More
Online Event Contesting Domesticity – a Panel Discussion Register registration required at no cost 20 April 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Authors: Kwelina Thompson, Cornell University; Shoniqua Roach, Brandeis University; Laura Puaca, Christopher Newport University Comment: Allison Horrocks, Lowell National Historical Park Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/WGS_Banner.jpg

The domestic realm has long captivated feminist scholars who have sought to understand the lives of women and the workings of gender. How have women experienced, challenged, leveraged, and shaped the domestic? This panel will consider these questions and discuss the domestic as a contested site of constraint and possibility. Shoniqua Roach theorizes the meanings of black domesticity as a deeply fraught space marked by anti-black sentiment and yet full of insurgent potential. Kwelina Thompson explores the history of the La Leche League – a Catholic mothers group that organized to support breastfeeding mothers in the mid-twentieth century. Finally, Laura Puaca tells the story of the expansion of post-WWII vocational rehabilitation programs to include disabled homemakers in the US.

The History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Online Event Clean Water, Green Space, and Social Equity Register registration required at no cost 22 April 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Karen Mauney-Brodek, Emerald Necklace Conservancy; Rep. Nika Elugardo; and Chris Reed, Harvard Graduate School of Design; moderated by Sarah Glazer This program is in partnership with the Muddy Water Initiative Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/thumbnail_WATERGOAT-8-14.jpg

The chain of green spaces and waterways that comprise the Emerald Necklace park system is an invaluable urban oasis. Described as “the lungs of the city” this parkland and its rivers and ponds clean the city air, provide habitats for birds and other wildlife, and greatly improve quality of life for Boston residents. Our panel will explore the past, present, and future of this urban wild, beginning with Olmsted’s vision, through the lens of social equity and environmental justice.

Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/thumbnail_MWI-logo1.jpg

close

Online Event Bound by War: How the United States and the Philippines Built America's First Pacific Century Register registration required at no cost 26 April 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Christopher Capozzola, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/CAPOZZOLA_Bound_By_War_300dpi.jpg

Ever since US troops occupied the Philippines in 1898, generations of Filipinos have served in and alongside the US armed forces. Historian Christopher Capozzola reveals this forgotten history, showing how war and military service forged an enduring, yet fraught, alliance between Americans and Filipinos. As the US military expanded in Asia, American forces confronted their Pacific rivals from Philippine bases and Filipinos became crucial partners in the exercise of US power. Their service reshaped Philippine society and politics and brought hundreds of thousands of Filipino immigrants to America, including World War II veterans who fought a decades-long battle to win equitable rights to citizenship and veterans benefits. Drawing on research across the U.S. and Asia, Bound by War tells the epic story of the U.S. and the Philippines through the wars the two nations fought together.

 

 

close

Online Event The “Other” Illegals: Unauthorized European Immigration to New York City and Boston in the 20th Century Register registration required at no cost 27 April 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Authors: Danielle Battisti, University of Nebraska – Omaha; Carly Goodman, La Salle University Comment: Christopher Capozzola Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/MASC_Banner.jpg

Since 1965, U.S. political and social discourse about immigration has been dominated by concerns over undocumented immigration, a legal and social category understood to apply almost exclusively to non-white immigrants. This panel will examine a now obscure part of twentieth century immigration history: the migration of unauthorized white Europeans. The session will complicate current understandings of the period to demonstrate that early in the twentieth century southern and eastern European immigrants were in fact stigmatized as “criminals” and “illegals.” However by mid-century, southern and eastern Europeans were able to draw upon their social and political capital to change public perceptions and state policies. Legal status provided relief from the threat of deportation or exclusion – and reinforced the racialized category of undocumented immigrant. These papers will bring the stories to light of these “other” illegal immigrants and reinsert them into the conversations and policy debates surrounding unauthorized immigration.

The Dina G. Malgeri Modern American Society & Culture Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paperLearn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Online Event Fashioning a Life: How Style Matters in Biography Register registration required at no cost 29 April 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Caroline Weber, Barnard College; Channing Joseph, University of Southern California Moderator: Natalie Dykstra, Hope College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/biography_banner.jpg

Is fashion art or commerce? Frivolous or full of meaning? Is fashion evidence? This panel brings together Caroline Weber, author of Queen of Fashion: What Marie-Antoinette Wore to the Revolution and Proust’s Duchess, and Channing Joseph, whose forthcoming book recovers the untold story of formerly enslaved William Dorsey Swann, who became, in the 1880s, a progenitor of ballroom and drag culture. They will join moderator Natalie Dykstra, author of Clover Adams: A Gilded and Heartbreaking Life, and now at work on a biography of Isabella Stewart Gardner, in a conversation about the ways biographers use fashion to decode lives and historical contexts. 

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Online Event The Invention of Miracles: Language, Power, and Alexander Graham Bell's Quest to End Deafness Register registration required at no cost 3 May 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Katie Booth in conversation with Jaipreet Virdi, University of Delaware Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/Booth_INVENTION_OF_MIRACLES_cover.jpg

Alexander Graham Bell is known as the inventor of the telephone, but as the son of a deaf woman and, later, husband to another, his goal in life from adolescence was to teach the deaf to speak. And yet by the end of his life, despite his best efforts—or perhaps because of them—Bell had become the American Deaf community’s most powerful enemy. Katie Booth recounts the complicated tragedy of a brilliant young man who set about stamping out what he saw as a dangerous language: Sign. The book offers a heartbreaking look at how heroes can become villains and how good intentions are, unfortunately, nowhere near enough—as well as a powerful account of the dawn of a civil rights movement and the triumphant tale of how the Deaf community reclaimed their once-forbidden language.

 

 

 

 

close

Online Event Honoring Bernard Bailyn: A Master Historian, An Inspiring Teacher Register registration required at no cost 4 May 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. with Mary Bilder, Boston College; Alison Games, Georgetown University; Jonathan Gienapp at Stanford University Moderator: Richard D. Brown, University of Connecticut Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EAHS_banner.jpg

This seminar honors the legacy and career of noted Harvard historian and MHS Life Trustee Bernard Bailyn. In his lengthy career, Prof. Bailyn explored and wrote about various areas in Early American history. Three leading historians will discuss Bailyn's influence on their respective sub-fields and on their own scholarship in this tribute to a master scholar and teacher.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Online Event The First Reconstruction: Black Politics in America from the Revolution to the Civil War Register registration required at no cost 17 May 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Van Gosse, Franklin and Marshall College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Spring_2021/153725874_10157845056792724_6935599351028128157_o.jpg

It may be difficult to imagine that a consequential black electoral politics evolved in the United States before the Civil War, for as of 1860, the overwhelming majority of African Americans remained in bondage. Yet free black men, many of them escaped slaves, steadily increased their influence in electoral politics over the course of the early American republic. Despite efforts to disenfranchise them, black men voted across much of the North, sometimes in numbers sufficient to swing elections. Van Gosse offers a sweeping reappraisal of the formative era of American democracy from the Constitution's ratification through Abraham Lincoln’s election, chronicling the rise of an organized, visible black politics focused on the quest for citizenship, the vote, and power within the free states.

 

 

close

Online Event Confronting Racial Injustice: The War on Drugs in Massachusetts: The Racial Impact of the School Zone Law and Other Mandatory Minimum Sentences Register registration required at no cost 19 May 2021.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This is an online program Sen. William N. Brownsberger; Abrigal Forrester, Center for Teen Empowerment; Rahsaan D. Hall, ACLU of Massachusetts; Deborah A. Ramirez, Northeastern University School of Law; and moderator Hon. Sydney Hanlon Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/ConcordHC-IMG-0823.jpg

In the 1980s, Massachusetts embraced the War on Drugs, enacting harsh mandatory minimum sentences for nonviolent drug offenses. It took decades to confront the reality that, in addition to being ineffective and costly, mandatory minimums resulted in the pervasive and disproportionate incarceration of Black and Brown people. Panelists will discuss this troubling history, recent reforms, and the prospects for implementing drug policies that are effective, fair, and just.

Moderator:

Hon. Sydney Hanlon, Massachusetts Appeals Court

Speaker:

Sen. William N. Brownsberger, Second Suffolk & Middlesex District; Abrigal Forrester, Executive Director, Center for Teen Empowerment; Rahsaan D. Hall, Director of the Racial Justice Program, American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts; Deborah A. Ramirez, Professor, Northeastern University School of Law

Developed by the Northeastern University School of Law Criminal Justice Task Force, Confronting Racial Injustice is a free, five-part series hosted by the Massachusetts Historical Society and sponsored by a number of Boston-area organizations.

close

Online Event Of Thee I Sing: The Contested History of American Patriotism Register registration required at no cost 26 May 2021.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Ben Railton, Fitchburg State University

When we talk about patriotism in America, we tend to mean one form: the version captured in shared celebrations like the national anthem and the Pledge of Allegiance. But as Ben Railton argues, that celebratory patriotism is just one of four distinct forms: celebratory, the communal expression of an idealized America; mythic, the creation of national myths that exclude certain communities; active, acts of service and sacrifice for the nation; and critical, arguments for how the nation has fallen short of its ideals that seek to move us toward that more perfect union. In Of Thee I Sing, Railton defines those four forms of American patriotism, using the four verses of “America the Beautiful” as examples of each type, and traces them across our histories.

 

 

close

Online Event Confronting Racial Injustice: The Charles Stuart Story: White Lies and Black Lives Register registration required at no cost 9 June 2021.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This is an online program Angela Onwuachi-Willig, Dean, Boston University School of Law; Hon. Leslie Harris (ret.), Suffolk Juvenile Court; Renée Graham, Columnist, The Boston Globe; moderated by Kim McLaurin, Associate Dean, Suffolk University Law School Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/thumbnail_Stuart_Graphic_-_hands.jpg

Charles Stuart, a white man, murdered his wife and unborn child in Boston in 1989 and falsely blamed the attack on a nonexistent Black man. Believing Stuart’s lie, the police engaged in a massive manhunt that terrorized a Black community in Mission Hill with detention, public strip-searches, and the arrest of two innocent men. As some lawmakers demanded the death penalty, the media perpetuated this false story. The Stuart case exemplifies how the narrative of white supremacy continues to lead to the dehumanization and devaluation of Black lives. Widespread acceptance of white lies over Black lives persists today.

Developed by the Northeastern University School of Law Criminal Justice Task Force, Confronting Racial Injustice is a free, five-part series hosted by the Massachusetts Historical Society and sponsored by a number of Boston-area organizations.

 

 

 

close