The MHS offers an engaging roster of programming to foster historical knowledge and we welcome everyone to attend, question, and contribute. We provide a forum for debate; host a variety of programs that delve into the complexities of history; and encourage people to share their observations, interpretations, and ideas. MHS programs include author talks, conversations, panel discussions, gallery tours, brown-bag lunches, seminars, conferences, and exclusive events for Members and donors. If you missed a program or would like to revisit the material presented, our videos page has many past programs.

March 2021
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/AAH_banner_immage.jpg Online Event, Seminar, African American History Seminar From Jobs and Freedom to Jobs and Opportunity: Andrew Young, Growth, and the Illusion of Job Creation 4 March 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Author: Danielle Wiggins, California Institution of Technology Comment: Brenna Greer, Wellesley College This paper considers Atlanta mayor Andrew Young’s shifting ideas about job creation and ...

This paper considers Atlanta mayor Andrew Young’s shifting ideas about job creation and economic opportunity to investigate how Democrats abandoned their 1970s goal of full employment in favor of policies that promoted private sector job creation via economic growth in the 1980s. By conflating growth with opportunity, Andrew Young sought to stake a middle path between development interests and anti-poverty coalitions, between white and black voters, and between civil rights liberalism and supply-side liberalism. However, economic growth and its promise of opportunity proved to be an inadequate solution for the range of issues its proponents intended it to address.

The African American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EHS_banner.jpg Online Event, Seminar, Environmental History Seminar Climate in Words and Numbers: How Early Americans Recorded Weather in Almanacs 9 March 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Joyce Chaplin, Harvard University As we begin to consider climate as an everyday problem, it's valuable to see how people did that in ...

As we begin to consider climate as an everyday problem, it's valuable to see how people did that in the past. With support from the Guggenheim Foundation, Joyce Chaplin is compiling and analyzing a database of manuscript notes about weather in early American almanacs,1646-1821, out of 10,578 almanacs from nine different archives or libraries. Her talk focuses on how people recorded the weather in numbers (including degrees Fahrenheit) and in words, ranging from “dull” to “elegant!” These notations are significant as records of a period of climate change, the Little Ice Age, also as records of how people made sense of and coped with that climatic disruption.

The Environmental History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. **This session does not have a pre-circulated paper. 

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/1611a446784b4602bd7f217d835770c1.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Conversation, Racial Injustice Series Confronting Racial Injustice: Redlining: From Slavery to $8 in 400 Years 11 March 2021.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This is an online program Lew Finfer, Massachusetts Community Action Network; Stephen Gray, Harvard Graduate School of Design; and moderator Adrian Walker, Boston Globe In 2015, the Boston Federal Reserve found the median net worth for Black families in Boston was $8, ...

In 2015, the Boston Federal Reserve found the median net worth for Black families in Boston was $8, in stark contrast to $250,000 for white families. This discrepancy is largely driven by the gap in home ownership. Join community activists and urban planners as they discuss Boston’s history of redlining and discriminatory housing policies, the complicity of the banks and the real estate industry, and the consequent legacy of segregation and racial wealth disparity. We will also identify some specific actions we can take to address the inequities in home ownership.

Moderator:

Adrian Walker, Columnist, The Boston Globe

Speakers:

Lewis Finfer, Co-Director, Massachusetts Communities Action Network; Stephen Gray, Associate Professor of Urban Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design

 

 

Image courtesy of "Mapping Inequality":

Robert K. Nelson, LaDale Winling, Richard Marciano, Nathan Connolly, et al., “Mapping Inequality,” American Panorama, ed. Robert K. Nelson and Edward L. Ayers, accessed January 14, 2021, https://dsl.richmond.edu/panorama/redlining/

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/Hunt_for_History.jpg Public Program, Author Talk, Online Event The Hunt for History: On the Trail of the World’s Lost Treasures—from the Letters of Lincoln, Churchill, & Einstein to the Secret Recordings Onboard JFK’s Air Force One 15 March 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Nathan Raab Nathan Raab describes his years as the Sherlock Holmes of historical artifacts and he shows us what ...

Nathan Raab describes his years as the Sherlock Holmes of historical artifacts and he shows us what the past can tell us about the present. Raab shares some fascinating stories: spotting a letter from British officials that secured the Rosetta Stone; discovering a piece of the first electric cable laid by Edison; restoring a fragmented letter from Andrew Jackson that led to the infamous Trail of Tears; and locating copies of missing audio that had been recorded on Air Force One as the plane brought JFK’s body back to Washington. Every document and artifact uncovers a story—and offers new insights into a life we thought we knew.

 

 

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EAHS_banner.jpg Seminar, Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar, Online Event Women of the Underground: Political Repression, Kinship Networks, and the Transatlantic Resistance to Restoration Politics 16 March 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Cynthia Van Zandt, University of New Hampshire Adrian Weimer, Providence College Non-conformist resistance to the Stuart Restoration is often told as the history of ministers, ...

Non-conformist resistance to the Stuart Restoration is often told as the history of ministers, regicides, and other men who actively preserved their loyalty to political and religious ideals of the 1640s and 1650s. However, many of the ongoing activities necessary to preserve the movement were carried out by women. This paper explores women’s roles in the transatlantic kinship, religious, and veterans’ networks which enabled nonconformists to sustain themselves in the face of defeat and repression.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/MHS_VisionaryCircle_Logo_FINAL_7704_xt__small_.jpg Visionary Circle Virtual Launch Event 17 March 2021.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 12:45PM This is a virtual event Please join us to celebrate the Founding Members of the MHS Visionary Circle planned giving program. ...

Please join us to celebrate the Founding Members of the MHS Visionary Circle planned giving program. We will hear about core planned gift options from representatives at Cornerstone Advisors and offer an opportunity for attendees to ask questions.

Any guests who declare their intent to make a planned gift will be recognized as a Founding Member and receive a special welcome gift.

Please contact VP of Development, Maureen Nguyen with any questions at mnguyen@masshist.org or 617-549-6318.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/heroic_souls.jpg Public Program, Author Talk, Online Event Heroic Souls: Records of Trial from Thomas Shepard's Church in Cambridge, 1638-1649 18 March 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Lori Rogers-Stokes The most exciting find in the records of puritan minister Thomas Shepard (Cambridge, 1638-1649) ...

The most exciting find in the records of puritan minister Thomas Shepard (Cambridge, 1638-1649) are the voices of the women who came to tell him their stories of spiritual seeking. Serving women, elderly widows, young wives and mothers, daughters of powerful men—all told stories of heroic seeking that feature their independent labor in reading, praying, listening, asking questions, and making meaning in a world narrowed down to just the seeker and her God. Heroic Souls, by Lori Rogers-Stokes, brings you these women’s stories—their lives and passions, and the super-charged energy for change, discovery, and meaning that they embrace.

 

 

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/9781623545352.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Conversation From Revolution to Pandemic: What Makes Boston One of the World’s Top Innovation Centers? 24 March 2021.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Robert Krim in conversation with Scott Kirsner Dr. Robert Krim, author of Boston Made: From Revolution to Robotics-Innovations that ...

Dr. Robert Krim, author of Boston Made: From Revolution to Robotics-Innovations that Changed the World, presents a fascinating journey through Boston’s innovation history. Looking at the range of Boston-born innovations that, over its 400-year history, have made Boston one of the world’s leading cities in innovation, Dr. Krim answers the question of why the city has remained innovative through its long history. He will describe in colorful detail the struggles the city—and its innovators—faced on their road to innovations which changed the nation or the world and will discuss how this unfettered innovative culture has helped the city reinvent itself after four devastating economic collapses.

 

 

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/biography_banner.jpg Seminar, Biography Seminar, Online Event Marriage of Minds or Boston Divorce? The lives and good works of Caroline Healey Dall and Rev. Charles Henry Appleton Dall on two continents 25 March 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Neilesh Bose, University of Victorial; Helen R. Deese, Caroline Healey Dall Editor, Massachusetts Historical Society Moderator: Megan Marshall, Emerson College Caroline Healey Dall (1822-1912) and Charles Henry Appleton Dall (1816-1886) met in Boston where, as ...

Caroline Healey Dall (1822-1912) and Charles Henry Appleton Dall (1816-1886) met in Boston where, as a teenager in Margaret Fuller’s Conversations, Caroline learned to ask “all the great questions of life.” The handsome but sickly Charles graduated from Harvard with Henry Thoreau and was influenced by Joseph Tuckerman’s ministry to the poor. Marrying in 1844, the couple struggled to find their footing as Charles took a series of ministerial jobs, each punctuated by a period of illness. When Charles left Caroline and their two children in 1855 to establish a Unitarian mission in Calcutta, drawn to the Brahmo Samaj and the Indian nationalist cause, his health improved. “Separated by half the earth,” historian Spencer Lavan writes, “their careers began to blossom.” Caroline emerged as a vehement writer and lecturer on abolition, women’s rights, and social science. Bose and Deese will effect a 21st-century reconciliation, putting into conversation a couple whose divergence led to lives of distinctive activism, documented in Caroline’s extensive journals held at the MHS.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/MASC_Banner.jpg Online Event, Seminar, Malgeri Modern American Society and Culture Seminar The Parlor and the Public: Tin Pan Alley and the Birth of Manhattan Mass Culture 30 March 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Author: Samuel Backer, Johns Hopkins University Comment: Jeffrey Melnick, University of Massachusetts - Boston During the late 19th century, the upstart sheet music firms known as Tin Pan Alley developed a ...

During the late 19th century, the upstart sheet music firms known as Tin Pan Alley developed a revolutionary approach to publishing, constructing a system able to sell songs at a previously unimaginable scale and rate. Relying on New York’s central role in national performance networks to disseminate their compositions, this industry was defined by the tension between publishers’ attempts to create mass-marketing commodities, and the fast-moving, alcohol-drenched urban environments in which their products were required to thrive.

The Dina G. Malgeri Modern American Society & Culture Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
April 2021
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/AAH_banner_immage.jpg Seminar, African American History Seminar, Online Event “Fighting the Dogs:” Fugitivity, Canine Hunters, and Slave Resistance in the Rural South 1 April 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Author: Tyler Parry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Comment: Harriet Ritvo, MIT As slavery expanded in the Americas, canine attacks were used as a particularly sadistic aspect of ...

As slavery expanded in the Americas, canine attacks were used as a particularly sadistic aspect of racist dehumanization. Through linked processes of breeding and training, slave hunters believed they had developed “natural” enemies between black people and the canines trained to hunt them. This paper investigates how fugitives responded to this interspecies violence by using various techniques of environmental resistance outside the plantation’s confines. By analyzing how fugitives used herbal combinations, waterways, and offensive weapons to subvert the canine's sensory advantage, this paper argues that enslaved communities should be understood as knowledge producers who studied their environments and used scientific awareness in their resistance.

The African American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/71VWixDgjQL.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Until Justice Be Done: America's First Civil Rights Movement, from the Revolution to Reconstruction 6 April 2021.Tuesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Kate Masur, Northwestern University in conversation with Edward Ayers, University of Richmond The half-century before the Civil War was beset with conflict over equality as well as freedom. Many ...

The half-century before the Civil War was beset with conflict over equality as well as freedom. Many free states enacted laws that restricted African Americans' rights and movement. But over time, African American activists and their white allies built a movement to fight these racist laws. Pastors, editors, lawyers, politicians, ship captains, and countless ordinary men and women battled in the press, the courts, the state legislatures, and Congress, through petitioning, lobbying, party politics, and elections. When Congress began rebuilding the nation after the Civil War, Republicans installed the movement’s vision of racial equality in the 1866 Civil Rights Act and the Fourteenth Amendment. Kate Masur and Edward Ayers will discuss Masur’s book, Until Justice Be Done, a pathbreaking new history of this early civil rights movement and it’s landmark achievements.

 

 

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/mha_photo6_2_1_work_lg.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk The Last American Aristocrat: The Brilliant Life and Improbable Education of Henry Adams 8 April 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program David S. Brown, Elizabethtown College Historian David Brown sheds light on the life and times of Henry Adams, perhaps the most ...

Historian David Brown sheds light on the life and times of Henry Adams, perhaps the most eclectic Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/the-last-american-aristocrat-9781982128234_hr.jpg accomplished and important American writer of his time. His autobiography and modern classic The Education of Henry Adams was widely considered one of the best English-language nonfiction books of the 20th century. The last member of his distinguished family—after great-grandfather John Adams, and grandfather John Quincy Adams—to gain national attention, he is remembered today as an historian, a political commentator, and a memoirist. Presenting intimate and insightful details of a fascinating and unusual American life and a new window on nineteenth century US history, Brown offers us a more “modern” and “human” Henry Adams than ever before.

 

 

More
Public Program, Online Event, Conversation 11 Places That Have Shaped Innovation in Boston, 1636-2021 12 April 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Scott Kirsner, Boston Globe, in conversation with Helen Greiner, co-founder of iRobot Author of the recently-published book Innovation Economy and longtime Boston ...

Author of the recently-published book Innovation Economy and longtime Boston Globe columnist, Scott Kirsner, will take you on a photographic tour of 11 places in the Boston area that have given birth to world-changing inventions, from the telephone to COVID vaccines to robots that vacuum your living room. Kirsner will be joined in conversation by iRobot co-founder Helen Greiner as they discuss the dynamics that make New England such a fertile place for invention and entrepreneurship and Greiner's journey in the innovation economy. 

 

 

 

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EHS_banner.jpg Seminar, Environmental History Seminar, Online Event Kaleidoscope Metropolis: Autonomy and Integration in the Fractured City 13 April 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Author: Garrett Nelson, Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center Comment: Lizbeth Cohen, Harvard University By the 1950s, just as technocratic consensus settled on the opinion that Boston’s metropolitan ...

By the 1950s, just as technocratic consensus settled on the opinion that Boston’s metropolitan problems demanded municipal consolidation, meaningful regional integration became a political dead letter. This paper examines how conflicting pressures towards both spatial integration and disintegration shaped the postwar city, with ecological concepts about environmental management jostling against demands for community autonomy coming from both right and left. Struggle over geographic units thereby became a key axis of conflict between different ideological strands of the politics of place.

The Environmental History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/School_desegratation.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Conversation, Racial Injustice Series Confronting Racial Injustice: Boston School Desegregation through the Rearview Mirror 15 April 2021.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This is an online program Martha Minow, Harvard Law School; Becky Shuster, Boston Public Schools; Rachel E. Twymon; and moderator Matthew F. Delmont, Dartmouth College In 1972, a group of African American parents sued city and state officials over segregation within ...

In 1972, a group of African American parents sued city and state officials over segregation within the Boston Public Schools. After a trial, a federal court determined that the Boston School Committee had intentionally discriminated on the basis of race by operating a dual school system that extended to school assignments, facilities, and staffing. When officials failed to produce a timely remedy, the court ordered institutional reforms, including re-districting and the re-assignment of students. In this program, panelists will reflect on the lessons to be learned from Boston’s school desegregation experience.

Moderator:

Matthew F. Delmont, Sherman Fairchild Distinguished Professor of History, Dartmouth College

Speakers:

Martha Minow, 300th Anniversary University Professor, Harvard University, and Former Dean, Harvard Law School; Becky Shuster, Assistant Superintendent of Equity, Boston Public School; Rachel E. Twymon, whose family was profiled in J. Anthony Lukas’ Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Common Ground

 

 

 

 

Image courtesy of Spencer Grant.

 

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/WGS_Banner.jpg Seminar, History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar, Online Event Contesting Domesticity – a Panel Discussion 20 April 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Authors: Kwelina Thompson, Cornell University; Shoniqua Roach, Brandeis University; Laura Puaca, Christopher Newport University Comment: Allison Horrocks, Lowell National Historical Park The domestic realm has long captivated feminist scholars who have sought to understand the lives of ...

The domestic realm has long captivated feminist scholars who have sought to understand the lives of women and the workings of gender. How have women experienced, challenged, leveraged, and shaped the domestic? This panel will consider these questions and discuss the domestic as a contested site of constraint and possibility. Shoniqua Roach theorizes the meanings of black domesticity as a deeply fraught space marked by anti-black sentiment and yet full of insurgent potential. Kwelina Thompson explores the history of the La Leche League – a Catholic mothers group that organized to support breastfeeding mothers in the mid-twentieth century. Finally, Laura Puaca tells the story of the expansion of post-WWII vocational rehabilitation programs to include disabled homemakers in the US.

The History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/thumbnail_WATERGOAT-8-14.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Clean Water, Green Space, and Social Equity 22 April 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Karen Mauney-Brodek, Emerald Necklace Conservancy; Rep. Nika Elugardo; and Chris Reed, Harvard Graduate School of Design; moderated by Sarah Glazer The chain of green spaces and waterways that comprise the Emerald Necklace park system is an ...

The chain of green spaces and waterways that comprise the Emerald Necklace park system is an invaluable urban oasis. Described as “the lungs of the city” this parkland and its rivers and ponds clean the city air, provide habitats for birds and other wildlife, and greatly improve quality of life for Boston residents. Our panel will explore the past, present, and future of this urban wild, beginning with Olmsted’s vision, through the lens of social equity and environmental justice.

 

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/MASC_Banner.jpg Seminar, Malgeri Modern American Society and Culture Seminar, Online Event The “Other” Illegals: Unauthorized European Immigration to New York City and Boston in the 20th Century 27 April 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Authors: Danielle Battisti, University of Nebraska – Omaha; Carly Goodman, La Salle University Comment: Christopher Capozzola Since 1965, U.S. political and social discourse about immigration has been dominated by concerns ...

Since 1965, U.S. political and social discourse about immigration has been dominated by concerns over undocumented immigration, a legal and social category understood to apply almost exclusively to non-white immigrants. This panel will examine a now obscure part of twentieth century immigration history: the migration of unauthorized white Europeans. The session will complicate current understandings of the period to demonstrate that early in the twentieth century southern and eastern European immigrants were in fact stigmatized as “criminals” and “illegals.” However by mid-century, southern and eastern Europeans were able to draw upon their social and political capital to change public perceptions and state policies. Legal status provided relief from the threat of deportation or exclusion – and reinforced the racialized category of undocumented immigrant. These papers will bring the stories to light of these “other” illegal immigrants and reinsert them into the conversations and policy debates surrounding unauthorized immigration.

The Dina G. Malgeri Modern American Society & Culture Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paperLearn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/biography_banner.jpg Seminar, Biography Seminar, Online Event Fashioning a Life: How Style Matters in Biography 29 April 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Caroline Weber, Barnard College; Channing Joseph, University of Southern California Moderator: Natalie Dykstra, Hope College Is fashion art or commerce? Frivolous or full of meaning? Is fashion evidence? This panel brings ...

Is fashion art or commerce? Frivolous or full of meaning? Is fashion evidence? This panel brings together Caroline Weber, author of Queen of Fashion: What Marie-Antoinette Wore to the Revolution and Proust’s Duchess, and Channing Joseph, whose forthcoming book recovers the untold story of formerly enslaved William Dorsey Swann, who became, in the 1880s, a progenitor of ballroom and drag culture. They will join moderator Natalie Dykstra, author of Clover Adams: A Gilded and Heartbreaking Life, and now at work on a biography of Isabella Stewart Gardner, in a conversation about the ways biographers use fashion to decode lives and historical contexts. 

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/exhibitions/WhoCounts_calendar-listing-graphic.jpg Exhibitionends Who Counts: A Look at Voter Rights through Political Cartoons 30 April 2021.Friday, all day This is a virtual exhibition. Political cartoons have long served to provoke public debate, illustrating opinions of the day for ...

Political cartoons have long served to provoke public debate, illustrating opinions of the day for the masses. From early in the 19th century, arguments over voting rights—who votes and who counts the votes—have been depicted in cartoons, especially with the rise of illustrated newspapers and magazines with a national circulation before the Civil War. 

Featuring examples of published cartoons from the MHS collections as well as other libraries and foundations, this exhibition illustrates how cartoonists helped to tell the story of voting rights in the United States. In addition to many drawings by Thomas Nast, the most influential American political cartoonist in the decades following the Civil War, this exhibition features modern reinterpretations of these topics by editorial cartoonists, including Herblock (Herbert Block), Tom Toles, Bill Mauldin, and the work of current Boston-area artists.

Explore the online exhibition at www.masshist.org/whocounts.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/exhibitions/ThomasNast_calendar-listing-graphic.jpg Exhibitionends Thomas Nast: A Life in Cartoons 30 April 2021.Friday, all day This is a virtual exhibition. Thomas Nast defined American political cartoons in the decades following the Civil War. His ...

Thomas Nast defined American political cartoons in the decades following the Civil War. His illustrations popularized icons such as the Republican elephant, the Democratic donkey, and even the modern image of Santa Claus. This exhibition highlights Thomas Nast’s remarkable impact through a cartoon biography created by local artists.

Explore the online exhibition at www.masshist.org/thomasnast.

More
May 2021
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EAHS_banner.jpg Seminar, Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar, Online Event Honoring Bernard Bailyn: A Master Historian, An Inspiring Teacher 4 May 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. with Mary Bilder, Boston College; Alison Games, Georgetown University; Jonathan Gienapp at Stanford University Moderator: Richard D. Brown, University of Connecticut This seminar honors the legacy and career of noted Harvard historian and MHS Life Trustee Bernard ...

This seminar honors the legacy and career of noted Harvard historian and MHS Life Trustee Bernard Bailyn. In his lengthy career, Prof. Bailyn explored and wrote about various areas in Early American history. Three leading historians will discuss Bailyn's influence on their respective sub-fields and on their own scholarship in this tribute to a master scholar and teacher.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/ConcordHC-IMG-0823.jpg Public Program, Online Event, Conversation, Racial Injustice Series Confronting Racial Injustice: The War on Drugs in Massachusetts: The Racial Impact of the School Zone Law and Other Mandatory Minimum Sentences 19 May 2021.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This is an online program Sen. William N. Brownsberger; Abrigal Forrester, Center for Teen Empowerment; Rahsaan D. Hall, ACLU of Massachusetts; Deborah A. Ramirez, Northeastern University School of Law; and moderator Hon. Sydney Hanlon In the 1980s, Massachusetts embraced the War on Drugs, enacting harsh mandatory minimum sentences ...

In the 1980s, Massachusetts embraced the War on Drugs, enacting harsh mandatory minimum sentences for nonviolent drug offenses. It took decades to confront the reality that, in addition to being ineffective and costly, mandatory minimums resulted in the pervasive and disproportionate incarceration of Black and Brown people. Panelists will discuss this troubling history, recent reforms, and the prospects for implementing drug policies that are effective, fair, and just.

Moderator:

Hon. Sydney Hanlon, Massachusetts Appeals Court

Speaker:

Sen. William N. Brownsberger, Second Suffolk & Middlesex District; Abrigal Forrester, Executive Director, Center for Teen Empowerment; Rahsaan D. Hall, Director of the Racial Justice Program, American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts; Deborah A. Ramirez, Professor, Northeastern University School of Law

More
Online Event, Seminar, African American History Seminar From Jobs and Freedom to Jobs and Opportunity: Andrew Young, Growth, and the Illusion of Job Creation Register registration required at no cost 4 March 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Author: Danielle Wiggins, California Institution of Technology Comment: Brenna Greer, Wellesley College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/AAH_banner_immage.jpg

This paper considers Atlanta mayor Andrew Young’s shifting ideas about job creation and economic opportunity to investigate how Democrats abandoned their 1970s goal of full employment in favor of policies that promoted private sector job creation via economic growth in the 1980s. By conflating growth with opportunity, Andrew Young sought to stake a middle path between development interests and anti-poverty coalitions, between white and black voters, and between civil rights liberalism and supply-side liberalism. However, economic growth and its promise of opportunity proved to be an inadequate solution for the range of issues its proponents intended it to address.

The African American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Online Event, Seminar, Environmental History Seminar Climate in Words and Numbers: How Early Americans Recorded Weather in Almanacs Register registration required at no cost 9 March 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Joyce Chaplin, Harvard University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EHS_banner.jpg

As we begin to consider climate as an everyday problem, it's valuable to see how people did that in the past. With support from the Guggenheim Foundation, Joyce Chaplin is compiling and analyzing a database of manuscript notes about weather in early American almanacs,1646-1821, out of 10,578 almanacs from nine different archives or libraries. Her talk focuses on how people recorded the weather in numbers (including degrees Fahrenheit) and in words, ranging from “dull” to “elegant!” These notations are significant as records of a period of climate change, the Little Ice Age, also as records of how people made sense of and coped with that climatic disruption.

The Environmental History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. **This session does not have a pre-circulated paper. 

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Public Program, Online Event, Conversation, Racial Injustice Series Confronting Racial Injustice: Redlining: From Slavery to $8 in 400 Years Register registration required at no cost 11 March 2021.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This is an online program Lew Finfer, Massachusetts Community Action Network; Stephen Gray, Harvard Graduate School of Design; and moderator Adrian Walker, Boston Globe Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/1611a446784b4602bd7f217d835770c1.jpg

In 2015, the Boston Federal Reserve found the median net worth for Black families in Boston was $8, in stark contrast to $250,000 for white families. This discrepancy is largely driven by the gap in home ownership. Join community activists and urban planners as they discuss Boston’s history of redlining and discriminatory housing policies, the complicity of the banks and the real estate industry, and the consequent legacy of segregation and racial wealth disparity. We will also identify some specific actions we can take to address the inequities in home ownership.

Moderator:

Adrian Walker, Columnist, The Boston Globe

Speakers:

Lewis Finfer, Co-Director, Massachusetts Communities Action Network; Stephen Gray, Associate Professor of Urban Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design

 

 

Image courtesy of "Mapping Inequality":

Robert K. Nelson, LaDale Winling, Richard Marciano, Nathan Connolly, et al., “Mapping Inequality,” American Panorama, ed. Robert K. Nelson and Edward L. Ayers, accessed January 14, 2021, https://dsl.richmond.edu/panorama/redlining/

close

Public Program, Author Talk, Online Event The Hunt for History: On the Trail of the World’s Lost Treasures—from the Letters of Lincoln, Churchill, & Einstein to the Secret Recordings Onboard JFK’s Air Force One Register registration required at no cost 15 March 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Nathan Raab Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/Hunt_for_History.jpg

Nathan Raab describes his years as the Sherlock Holmes of historical artifacts and he shows us what the past can tell us about the present. Raab shares some fascinating stories: spotting a letter from British officials that secured the Rosetta Stone; discovering a piece of the first electric cable laid by Edison; restoring a fragmented letter from Andrew Jackson that led to the infamous Trail of Tears; and locating copies of missing audio that had been recorded on Air Force One as the plane brought JFK’s body back to Washington. Every document and artifact uncovers a story—and offers new insights into a life we thought we knew.

 

 

close

Seminar, Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar, Online Event Women of the Underground: Political Repression, Kinship Networks, and the Transatlantic Resistance to Restoration Politics Register registration required at no cost 16 March 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Cynthia Van Zandt, University of New Hampshire Adrian Weimer, Providence College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EAHS_banner.jpg

Non-conformist resistance to the Stuart Restoration is often told as the history of ministers, regicides, and other men who actively preserved their loyalty to political and religious ideals of the 1640s and 1650s. However, many of the ongoing activities necessary to preserve the movement were carried out by women. This paper explores women’s roles in the transatlantic kinship, religious, and veterans’ networks which enabled nonconformists to sustain themselves in the face of defeat and repression.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Visionary Circle Virtual Launch Event Register registration required at no cost 17 March 2021.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 12:45PM This is a virtual event Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/MHS_VisionaryCircle_Logo_FINAL_7704_xt__small_.jpg

Please join us to celebrate the Founding Members of the MHS Visionary Circle planned giving program. We will hear about core planned gift options from representatives at Cornerstone Advisors and offer an opportunity for attendees to ask questions.

Any guests who declare their intent to make a planned gift will be recognized as a Founding Member and receive a special welcome gift.

Please contact VP of Development, Maureen Nguyen with any questions at mnguyen@masshist.org or 617-549-6318.

close

Public Program, Author Talk, Online Event Heroic Souls: Records of Trial from Thomas Shepard's Church in Cambridge, 1638-1649 Register registration required at no cost 18 March 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Lori Rogers-Stokes Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/heroic_souls.jpg

The most exciting find in the records of puritan minister Thomas Shepard (Cambridge, 1638-1649) are the voices of the women who came to tell him their stories of spiritual seeking. Serving women, elderly widows, young wives and mothers, daughters of powerful men—all told stories of heroic seeking that feature their independent labor in reading, praying, listening, asking questions, and making meaning in a world narrowed down to just the seeker and her God. Heroic Souls, by Lori Rogers-Stokes, brings you these women’s stories—their lives and passions, and the super-charged energy for change, discovery, and meaning that they embrace.

 

 

close

Public Program, Online Event, Conversation From Revolution to Pandemic: What Makes Boston One of the World’s Top Innovation Centers? Register registration required at no cost 24 March 2021.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Robert Krim in conversation with Scott Kirsner Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/9781623545352.jpg

Dr. Robert Krim, author of Boston Made: From Revolution to Robotics-Innovations that Changed the World, presents a fascinating journey through Boston’s innovation history. Looking at the range of Boston-born innovations that, over its 400-year history, have made Boston one of the world’s leading cities in innovation, Dr. Krim answers the question of why the city has remained innovative through its long history. He will describe in colorful detail the struggles the city—and its innovators—faced on their road to innovations which changed the nation or the world and will discuss how this unfettered innovative culture has helped the city reinvent itself after four devastating economic collapses.

 

 

close

Seminar, Biography Seminar, Online Event Marriage of Minds or Boston Divorce? The lives and good works of Caroline Healey Dall and Rev. Charles Henry Appleton Dall on two continents Register registration required at no cost 25 March 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Neilesh Bose, University of Victorial; Helen R. Deese, Caroline Healey Dall Editor, Massachusetts Historical Society Moderator: Megan Marshall, Emerson College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/biography_banner.jpg

Caroline Healey Dall (1822-1912) and Charles Henry Appleton Dall (1816-1886) met in Boston where, as a teenager in Margaret Fuller’s Conversations, Caroline learned to ask “all the great questions of life.” The handsome but sickly Charles graduated from Harvard with Henry Thoreau and was influenced by Joseph Tuckerman’s ministry to the poor. Marrying in 1844, the couple struggled to find their footing as Charles took a series of ministerial jobs, each punctuated by a period of illness. When Charles left Caroline and their two children in 1855 to establish a Unitarian mission in Calcutta, drawn to the Brahmo Samaj and the Indian nationalist cause, his health improved. “Separated by half the earth,” historian Spencer Lavan writes, “their careers began to blossom.” Caroline emerged as a vehement writer and lecturer on abolition, women’s rights, and social science. Bose and Deese will effect a 21st-century reconciliation, putting into conversation a couple whose divergence led to lives of distinctive activism, documented in Caroline’s extensive journals held at the MHS.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Online Event, Seminar, Malgeri Modern American Society and Culture Seminar The Parlor and the Public: Tin Pan Alley and the Birth of Manhattan Mass Culture Register registration required at no cost 30 March 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Author: Samuel Backer, Johns Hopkins University Comment: Jeffrey Melnick, University of Massachusetts - Boston Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/MASC_Banner.jpg

During the late 19th century, the upstart sheet music firms known as Tin Pan Alley developed a revolutionary approach to publishing, constructing a system able to sell songs at a previously unimaginable scale and rate. Relying on New York’s central role in national performance networks to disseminate their compositions, this industry was defined by the tension between publishers’ attempts to create mass-marketing commodities, and the fast-moving, alcohol-drenched urban environments in which their products were required to thrive.

The Dina G. Malgeri Modern American Society & Culture Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Seminar, African American History Seminar, Online Event “Fighting the Dogs:” Fugitivity, Canine Hunters, and Slave Resistance in the Rural South Register registration required at no cost 1 April 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Author: Tyler Parry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Comment: Harriet Ritvo, MIT Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/AAH_banner_immage.jpg

As slavery expanded in the Americas, canine attacks were used as a particularly sadistic aspect of racist dehumanization. Through linked processes of breeding and training, slave hunters believed they had developed “natural” enemies between black people and the canines trained to hunt them. This paper investigates how fugitives responded to this interspecies violence by using various techniques of environmental resistance outside the plantation’s confines. By analyzing how fugitives used herbal combinations, waterways, and offensive weapons to subvert the canine's sensory advantage, this paper argues that enslaved communities should be understood as knowledge producers who studied their environments and used scientific awareness in their resistance.

The African American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Until Justice Be Done: America's First Civil Rights Movement, from the Revolution to Reconstruction Register registration required at no cost 6 April 2021.Tuesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Kate Masur, Northwestern University in conversation with Edward Ayers, University of Richmond Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/71VWixDgjQL.jpg

The half-century before the Civil War was beset with conflict over equality as well as freedom. Many free states enacted laws that restricted African Americans' rights and movement. But over time, African American activists and their white allies built a movement to fight these racist laws. Pastors, editors, lawyers, politicians, ship captains, and countless ordinary men and women battled in the press, the courts, the state legislatures, and Congress, through petitioning, lobbying, party politics, and elections. When Congress began rebuilding the nation after the Civil War, Republicans installed the movement’s vision of racial equality in the 1866 Civil Rights Act and the Fourteenth Amendment. Kate Masur and Edward Ayers will discuss Masur’s book, Until Justice Be Done, a pathbreaking new history of this early civil rights movement and it’s landmark achievements.

 

 

close

Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk The Last American Aristocrat: The Brilliant Life and Improbable Education of Henry Adams Register registration required at no cost 8 April 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program David S. Brown, Elizabethtown College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/mha_photo6_2_1_work_lg.jpg

Historian David Brown sheds light on the life and times of Henry Adams, perhaps the most eclectic Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/the-last-american-aristocrat-9781982128234_hr.jpg accomplished and important American writer of his time. His autobiography and modern classic The Education of Henry Adams was widely considered one of the best English-language nonfiction books of the 20th century. The last member of his distinguished family—after great-grandfather John Adams, and grandfather John Quincy Adams—to gain national attention, he is remembered today as an historian, a political commentator, and a memoirist. Presenting intimate and insightful details of a fascinating and unusual American life and a new window on nineteenth century US history, Brown offers us a more “modern” and “human” Henry Adams than ever before.

 

 

close

Public Program, Online Event, Conversation 11 Places That Have Shaped Innovation in Boston, 1636-2021 Register registration required at no cost 12 April 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Scott Kirsner, Boston Globe, in conversation with Helen Greiner, co-founder of iRobot

Author of the recently-published book Innovation Economy and longtime Boston Globe columnist, Scott Kirsner, will take you on a photographic tour of 11 places in the Boston area that have given birth to world-changing inventions, from the telephone to COVID vaccines to robots that vacuum your living room. Kirsner will be joined in conversation by iRobot co-founder Helen Greiner as they discuss the dynamics that make New England such a fertile place for invention and entrepreneurship and Greiner's journey in the innovation economy. 

 

 

 

close

Seminar, Environmental History Seminar, Online Event Kaleidoscope Metropolis: Autonomy and Integration in the Fractured City Register registration required at no cost 13 April 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Author: Garrett Nelson, Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center Comment: Lizbeth Cohen, Harvard University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EHS_banner.jpg

By the 1950s, just as technocratic consensus settled on the opinion that Boston’s metropolitan problems demanded municipal consolidation, meaningful regional integration became a political dead letter. This paper examines how conflicting pressures towards both spatial integration and disintegration shaped the postwar city, with ecological concepts about environmental management jostling against demands for community autonomy coming from both right and left. Struggle over geographic units thereby became a key axis of conflict between different ideological strands of the politics of place.

The Environmental History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Public Program, Online Event, Conversation, Racial Injustice Series Confronting Racial Injustice: Boston School Desegregation through the Rearview Mirror Register registration required at no cost 15 April 2021.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This is an online program Martha Minow, Harvard Law School; Becky Shuster, Boston Public Schools; Rachel E. Twymon; and moderator Matthew F. Delmont, Dartmouth College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/School_desegratation.jpg

In 1972, a group of African American parents sued city and state officials over segregation within the Boston Public Schools. After a trial, a federal court determined that the Boston School Committee had intentionally discriminated on the basis of race by operating a dual school system that extended to school assignments, facilities, and staffing. When officials failed to produce a timely remedy, the court ordered institutional reforms, including re-districting and the re-assignment of students. In this program, panelists will reflect on the lessons to be learned from Boston’s school desegregation experience.

Moderator:

Matthew F. Delmont, Sherman Fairchild Distinguished Professor of History, Dartmouth College

Speakers:

Martha Minow, 300th Anniversary University Professor, Harvard University, and Former Dean, Harvard Law School; Becky Shuster, Assistant Superintendent of Equity, Boston Public School; Rachel E. Twymon, whose family was profiled in J. Anthony Lukas’ Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Common Ground

 

 

 

 

Image courtesy of Spencer Grant.

 

close

Seminar, History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar, Online Event Contesting Domesticity – a Panel Discussion Register registration required at no cost 20 April 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Authors: Kwelina Thompson, Cornell University; Shoniqua Roach, Brandeis University; Laura Puaca, Christopher Newport University Comment: Allison Horrocks, Lowell National Historical Park Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/WGS_Banner.jpg

The domestic realm has long captivated feminist scholars who have sought to understand the lives of women and the workings of gender. How have women experienced, challenged, leveraged, and shaped the domestic? This panel will consider these questions and discuss the domestic as a contested site of constraint and possibility. Shoniqua Roach theorizes the meanings of black domesticity as a deeply fraught space marked by anti-black sentiment and yet full of insurgent potential. Kwelina Thompson explores the history of the La Leche League – a Catholic mothers group that organized to support breastfeeding mothers in the mid-twentieth century. Finally, Laura Puaca tells the story of the expansion of post-WWII vocational rehabilitation programs to include disabled homemakers in the US.

The History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Public Program, Online Event, Conversation Clean Water, Green Space, and Social Equity Register registration required at no cost 22 April 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Karen Mauney-Brodek, Emerald Necklace Conservancy; Rep. Nika Elugardo; and Chris Reed, Harvard Graduate School of Design; moderated by Sarah Glazer Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/thumbnail_WATERGOAT-8-14.jpg

The chain of green spaces and waterways that comprise the Emerald Necklace park system is an invaluable urban oasis. Described as “the lungs of the city” this parkland and its rivers and ponds clean the city air, provide habitats for birds and other wildlife, and greatly improve quality of life for Boston residents. Our panel will explore the past, present, and future of this urban wild, beginning with Olmsted’s vision, through the lens of social equity and environmental justice.

 

close

Seminar, Malgeri Modern American Society and Culture Seminar, Online Event The “Other” Illegals: Unauthorized European Immigration to New York City and Boston in the 20th Century Register registration required at no cost 27 April 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Authors: Danielle Battisti, University of Nebraska – Omaha; Carly Goodman, La Salle University Comment: Christopher Capozzola Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/MASC_Banner.jpg

Since 1965, U.S. political and social discourse about immigration has been dominated by concerns over undocumented immigration, a legal and social category understood to apply almost exclusively to non-white immigrants. This panel will examine a now obscure part of twentieth century immigration history: the migration of unauthorized white Europeans. The session will complicate current understandings of the period to demonstrate that early in the twentieth century southern and eastern European immigrants were in fact stigmatized as “criminals” and “illegals.” However by mid-century, southern and eastern Europeans were able to draw upon their social and political capital to change public perceptions and state policies. Legal status provided relief from the threat of deportation or exclusion – and reinforced the racialized category of undocumented immigrant. These papers will bring the stories to light of these “other” illegal immigrants and reinsert them into the conversations and policy debates surrounding unauthorized immigration.

The Dina G. Malgeri Modern American Society & Culture Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paperLearn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Seminar, Biography Seminar, Online Event Fashioning a Life: How Style Matters in Biography Register registration required at no cost 29 April 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Caroline Weber, Barnard College; Channing Joseph, University of Southern California Moderator: Natalie Dykstra, Hope College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/biography_banner.jpg

Is fashion art or commerce? Frivolous or full of meaning? Is fashion evidence? This panel brings together Caroline Weber, author of Queen of Fashion: What Marie-Antoinette Wore to the Revolution and Proust’s Duchess, and Channing Joseph, whose forthcoming book recovers the untold story of formerly enslaved William Dorsey Swann, who became, in the 1880s, a progenitor of ballroom and drag culture. They will join moderator Natalie Dykstra, author of Clover Adams: A Gilded and Heartbreaking Life, and now at work on a biography of Isabella Stewart Gardner, in a conversation about the ways biographers use fashion to decode lives and historical contexts. 

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Exhibition Who Counts: A Look at Voter Rights through Political Cartoons this event is free This is a virtual exhibition. Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/exhibitions/WhoCounts_calendar-listing-graphic.jpg

Political cartoons have long served to provoke public debate, illustrating opinions of the day for the masses. From early in the 19th century, arguments over voting rights—who votes and who counts the votes—have been depicted in cartoons, especially with the rise of illustrated newspapers and magazines with a national circulation before the Civil War. 

Featuring examples of published cartoons from the MHS collections as well as other libraries and foundations, this exhibition illustrates how cartoonists helped to tell the story of voting rights in the United States. In addition to many drawings by Thomas Nast, the most influential American political cartoonist in the decades following the Civil War, this exhibition features modern reinterpretations of these topics by editorial cartoonists, including Herblock (Herbert Block), Tom Toles, Bill Mauldin, and the work of current Boston-area artists.

Explore the online exhibition at www.masshist.org/whocounts.

close

Exhibition Thomas Nast: A Life in Cartoons this event is free This is a virtual exhibition. Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/exhibitions/ThomasNast_calendar-listing-graphic.jpg

Thomas Nast defined American political cartoons in the decades following the Civil War. His illustrations popularized icons such as the Republican elephant, the Democratic donkey, and even the modern image of Santa Claus. This exhibition highlights Thomas Nast’s remarkable impact through a cartoon biography created by local artists.

Explore the online exhibition at www.masshist.org/thomasnast.

close

Seminar, Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar, Online Event Honoring Bernard Bailyn: A Master Historian, An Inspiring Teacher Register registration required at no cost 4 May 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. with Mary Bilder, Boston College; Alison Games, Georgetown University; Jonathan Gienapp at Stanford University Moderator: Richard D. Brown, University of Connecticut Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EAHS_banner.jpg

This seminar honors the legacy and career of noted Harvard historian and MHS Life Trustee Bernard Bailyn. In his lengthy career, Prof. Bailyn explored and wrote about various areas in Early American history. Three leading historians will discuss Bailyn's influence on their respective sub-fields and on their own scholarship in this tribute to a master scholar and teacher.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Public Program, Online Event, Conversation, Racial Injustice Series Confronting Racial Injustice: The War on Drugs in Massachusetts: The Racial Impact of the School Zone Law and Other Mandatory Minimum Sentences Register registration required at no cost 19 May 2021.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This is an online program Sen. William N. Brownsberger; Abrigal Forrester, Center for Teen Empowerment; Rahsaan D. Hall, ACLU of Massachusetts; Deborah A. Ramirez, Northeastern University School of Law; and moderator Hon. Sydney Hanlon Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/ConcordHC-IMG-0823.jpg

In the 1980s, Massachusetts embraced the War on Drugs, enacting harsh mandatory minimum sentences for nonviolent drug offenses. It took decades to confront the reality that, in addition to being ineffective and costly, mandatory minimums resulted in the pervasive and disproportionate incarceration of Black and Brown people. Panelists will discuss this troubling history, recent reforms, and the prospects for implementing drug policies that are effective, fair, and just.

Moderator:

Hon. Sydney Hanlon, Massachusetts Appeals Court

Speaker:

Sen. William N. Brownsberger, Second Suffolk & Middlesex District; Abrigal Forrester, Executive Director, Center for Teen Empowerment; Rahsaan D. Hall, Director of the Racial Justice Program, American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts; Deborah A. Ramirez, Professor, Northeastern University School of Law

close