History of Women and Gender

Exhibition

Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country

Massachusetts Women in WWI. 12 June 2014 to 24 January 2015

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Join us for an in-depth exploration of the latest scholarship.

The Boston Seminar on the History of Women and Gender invites scholars and students to meet periodically and discuss new research. Sessions may consider any aspect of the history of women and gender without chronological limitations. A collaboration of the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America and the Massachusetts Historical Society, the seminar meets in turn at the facilities of the two sponsors.

Seminar meetings revolve around the discussion of a precirculated paper. Sessions open with remarks from the essayist and an assigned commentator, after which the discussion is opened to the floor. After each session, the Society serves a light buffet supper.

February

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History of Women and Gender Seminar Her Hat Will Not Down: Sumptuary Laws and Consumer Rights in 1890s Chicago 12 February 2015.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Location: Schlesinger Library Emily A. Remus, American Academy of Arts and Sciences Comment: Ardis Cameron, University of Southern Maine This presentation examines a sumptuary law passed in Chicago to regulate the size of ladies’ ...

This presentation examines a sumptuary law passed in Chicago to regulate the size of ladies’ theater hats and a near-riot that erupted over it. It reveals how civic authorities sought to protect the rights of ticketholders by constraining the conspicuous consumption of women. The paper offers insight into early notions of consumer rights and the remaking of gender codes amid capitalist transformation.

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History of Women and Gender Seminar Her Hat Will Not Down: Sumptuary Laws and Consumer Rights in 1890s Chicago 12 February 2015.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required. Location: Schlesinger Library Emily A. Remus, American Academy of Arts and Sciences Comment: Ardis Cameron, University of Southern Maine

This presentation examines a sumptuary law passed in Chicago to regulate the size of ladies’ theater hats and a near-riot that erupted over it. It reveals how civic authorities sought to protect the rights of ticketholders by constraining the conspicuous consumption of women. The paper offers insight into early notions of consumer rights and the remaking of gender codes amid capitalist transformation.

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