Brown Bags

Exhibition

Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country

Massachusetts Women in WWI. 12 June 2014 to 24 January 2015

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November

Brown Bag Choosing Challenges 5 November 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Gavin Kleespies, Massachusetts Historical Society Public programs are often the most direct contact a historical society has with its members and the ...

Public programs are often the most direct contact a historical society has with its members and the larger community. If an institution's presentations are well targeted, they can be an effective tool for forging new relationships, establishing connections among previously disparate groups, increasing support, and even redefining public perception. However, like any tool, programs are only effective if you have a clear sense of the goals you're aiming for. This presentation, by the Society’s new Director of Public Programs, will give a rough outline of goals determined through meetings with key constituents at the Massachusetts Historical Society and proposed tactics to meet these challenges. 

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Brown Bag Making the Self-Made American: The Original Meanings and Purposes of America’s Public Schools 12 November 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Johann Neem, Western Washington University and the University of Virginia In Making the Self-Made American, Professor Neem seeks to answer a simple question: why, in ...

In Making the Self-Made American, Professor Neem seeks to answer a simple question: why, in the age of individualism, did so many parents, taxpayers, and policymakers invest significant resources to build and to support public school systems? The answer is deceptively simple: new ideas about democracy and freedom combined with the economic imperative of “making it” in a free market economy. In other words, engaging in self-making was difficult and challenging and people had to prepare for it. Failure, both spiritual and economic, was a very real possibility. Public schools thus provided what young people needed to face the world. In short, American individualism required collective effort.

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December
Brown Bag Denominating a People: Congregational Laity, Church Disestablishment, and the Struggles of Denominationalism in Massachusetts, 1780-1865 3 December 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Seth Meehan, Institute for Advanced Jesuit Studies, Boston College Local sources of church history—historical societies, libraries, town halls, and church ...

Local sources of church history—historical societies, libraries, town halls, and church basements and vaults—reveal a new half to Congregational historiography. Within the churches themselves power shifted to the pews and the laity and clergy fractured. There was no small degree of chaos, and it inhibited Congregationalists from denominating themselves from other groups and from articulating what was the unity in their diversity. Using a comparative approach focusing on Barnstable and Berkshire counties, this program will interest Congregational scholars and other historians alike.

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More events
Brown Bag Choosing Challenges 5 November 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Gavin Kleespies, Massachusetts Historical Society

Public programs are often the most direct contact a historical society has with its members and the larger community. If an institution's presentations are well targeted, they can be an effective tool for forging new relationships, establishing connections among previously disparate groups, increasing support, and even redefining public perception. However, like any tool, programs are only effective if you have a clear sense of the goals you're aiming for. This presentation, by the Society’s new Director of Public Programs, will give a rough outline of goals determined through meetings with key constituents at the Massachusetts Historical Society and proposed tactics to meet these challenges. 

close
Brown Bag Making the Self-Made American: The Original Meanings and Purposes of America’s Public Schools 12 November 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Johann Neem, Western Washington University and the University of Virginia

In Making the Self-Made American, Professor Neem seeks to answer a simple question: why, in the age of individualism, did so many parents, taxpayers, and policymakers invest significant resources to build and to support public school systems? The answer is deceptively simple: new ideas about democracy and freedom combined with the economic imperative of “making it” in a free market economy. In other words, engaging in self-making was difficult and challenging and people had to prepare for it. Failure, both spiritual and economic, was a very real possibility. Public schools thus provided what young people needed to face the world. In short, American individualism required collective effort.

close
Brown Bag Denominating a People: Congregational Laity, Church Disestablishment, and the Struggles of Denominationalism in Massachusetts, 1780-1865 3 December 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Seth Meehan, Institute for Advanced Jesuit Studies, Boston College

Local sources of church history—historical societies, libraries, town halls, and church basements and vaults—reveal a new half to Congregational historiography. Within the churches themselves power shifted to the pews and the laity and clergy fractured. There was no small degree of chaos, and it inhibited Congregationalists from denominating themselves from other groups and from articulating what was the unity in their diversity. Using a comparative approach focusing on Barnstable and Berkshire counties, this program will interest Congregational scholars and other historians alike.

close

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