April

Brown Bag Contesting the Centennial: Civil War Memory at the 1876 World's Fair 1 April 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Krista Kinslow, Boston University The 1876 Philadelphia Exhibition was promoted as a fair to show off American greatness. But at the ...

The 1876 Philadelphia Exhibition was promoted as a fair to show off American greatness. But at the same time, the Centennial exposed the rifts in society. Given that the Civil War had ended only eleven years before, a celebration of American unity and power bore a certain irony. Issues of the Civil War pervaded the Centennial Exhibition and this project explores the different ways in which Americans brought their particular memories of that war to Philadelphia. 

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Brown Bag When "the Fourteenth Colony" Lost its Place: Quebec after 1776 8 April 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jacqueline Reynoso, Cornell University Quebec has often been referred to as "the fourteenth colony." The Quebec Act of 1774 featured among ...

Quebec has often been referred to as "the fourteenth colony." The Quebec Act of 1774 featured among the enumerated grievances in the United Colonies' Declaration of Independence, and much of the colony served as the scene of one of the Continental Army's first military campaigns. Yet, the end of the army's siege of Quebec City on May 6, 1776 is often treated as the end of Quebec's relevance to the American Revolution. In this talk, Reynoso argues that the colony's relevance did not end when the siege did, and she explores different ways of approaching the study of Quebec and the revolution after May 1776.

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Brown Bag The Urban World of the Early Modern British Caribbean 15 April 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Mary Draper, University of Virginia This project examines the history of the early modern British Caribbean through its cities and ...

This project examines the history of the early modern British Caribbean through its cities and urban residents. By analyzing the founding, development, and integration of the Caribbean's port cities as well as the enterprises of its urban residents, Draper demonstrates that the townscapes of these cities were the stages on which colonists adapted to the harsh environs of the West Indies. There, residents, visitors, and officials created artificial land, fortified settlements, forged extensive hinterlands, and fostered communication networks. By doing so, they helped transform the Caribbean into the most profitable region in early modern British America.

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May
Brown Bag Slave Horse: The Narragansett Pacer 6 May 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Charlotte Carrington-Farmer, Roger Williams University This project uses horses and the horse trade as a lens to explore a range of connections among ...

This project uses horses and the horse trade as a lens to explore a range of connections among people, colonies, and nations in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Part of a larger book project on horses throughout the Atlantic World, it focuses specifically on the Narragansett Pacer, a mixture of Dutch, Irish, and English breeds that was bred in Rhode Island for a wider global market. As such, it was entwined with slavery and the transatlantic slave trade. The first truly “American” horse, the Pacer was extinct by the nineteenth century.

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Brown Bag Purity and Power: The American Sugar Empire in the Gilded Age 27 May 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM David Singerman, MIT In the late nineteenth century, American dreams of empire were built on sugar. The Bostonian sugar ...

In the late nineteenth century, American dreams of empire were built on sugar. The Bostonian sugar magnate Edwin Atkins, a key architect of that empire, owned New England refineries, Atlantic shipping lines, and Cuban plantations. By following Atkins’s machinations from the White House to the customs house, we can see how U.S. attempts to govern labor and nature overseas were linked to the most contentious issues of Gilded Age political economy: corruption, free trade, and monopoly power.

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June
Brown Bag The Invention of Rum 3 June 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jordan Smith, Georgetown University This project investigates the history of rum in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In ...

This project investigates the history of rum in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In particular, it examines the processes of invention, commodification, innovation, and transformation that defined the spirit's production in the West Indies, North America, and Britain. Ultimately, rum—and the knowledge necessary for its production—was pioneered by a complex cast of free and coerced workers operating in various parts of the British Atlantic world.

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More events
Brown Bag Contesting the Centennial: Civil War Memory at the 1876 World's Fair 1 April 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Krista Kinslow, Boston University

The 1876 Philadelphia Exhibition was promoted as a fair to show off American greatness. But at the same time, the Centennial exposed the rifts in society. Given that the Civil War had ended only eleven years before, a celebration of American unity and power bore a certain irony. Issues of the Civil War pervaded the Centennial Exhibition and this project explores the different ways in which Americans brought their particular memories of that war to Philadelphia. 

close
Brown Bag When "the Fourteenth Colony" Lost its Place: Quebec after 1776 8 April 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Jacqueline Reynoso, Cornell University

Quebec has often been referred to as "the fourteenth colony." The Quebec Act of 1774 featured among the enumerated grievances in the United Colonies' Declaration of Independence, and much of the colony served as the scene of one of the Continental Army's first military campaigns. Yet, the end of the army's siege of Quebec City on May 6, 1776 is often treated as the end of Quebec's relevance to the American Revolution. In this talk, Reynoso argues that the colony's relevance did not end when the siege did, and she explores different ways of approaching the study of Quebec and the revolution after May 1776.

close
Brown Bag The Urban World of the Early Modern British Caribbean 15 April 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Mary Draper, University of Virginia

This project examines the history of the early modern British Caribbean through its cities and urban residents. By analyzing the founding, development, and integration of the Caribbean's port cities as well as the enterprises of its urban residents, Draper demonstrates that the townscapes of these cities were the stages on which colonists adapted to the harsh environs of the West Indies. There, residents, visitors, and officials created artificial land, fortified settlements, forged extensive hinterlands, and fostered communication networks. By doing so, they helped transform the Caribbean into the most profitable region in early modern British America.

close
Brown Bag Slave Horse: The Narragansett Pacer 6 May 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Charlotte Carrington-Farmer, Roger Williams University

This project uses horses and the horse trade as a lens to explore a range of connections among people, colonies, and nations in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Part of a larger book project on horses throughout the Atlantic World, it focuses specifically on the Narragansett Pacer, a mixture of Dutch, Irish, and English breeds that was bred in Rhode Island for a wider global market. As such, it was entwined with slavery and the transatlantic slave trade. The first truly “American” horse, the Pacer was extinct by the nineteenth century.

close
Brown Bag Purity and Power: The American Sugar Empire in the Gilded Age 27 May 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free David Singerman, MIT

In the late nineteenth century, American dreams of empire were built on sugar. The Bostonian sugar magnate Edwin Atkins, a key architect of that empire, owned New England refineries, Atlantic shipping lines, and Cuban plantations. By following Atkins’s machinations from the White House to the customs house, we can see how U.S. attempts to govern labor and nature overseas were linked to the most contentious issues of Gilded Age political economy: corruption, free trade, and monopoly power.

close
Brown Bag The Invention of Rum 3 June 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Jordan Smith, Georgetown University

This project investigates the history of rum in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In particular, it examines the processes of invention, commodification, innovation, and transformation that defined the spirit's production in the West Indies, North America, and Britain. Ultimately, rum—and the knowledge necessary for its production—was pioneered by a complex cast of free and coerced workers operating in various parts of the British Atlantic world.

close

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