August

Brown Bag African Americans and the Cultural Work of Freemasonry: From Revolution Through Reconstruction 5 August 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Sueanna Smith, University of South Carolina This talk will explore the print, manuscript, art, and artifact culture that freemasons created in ...

This talk will explore the print, manuscript, art, and artifact culture that freemasons created in the late 18th and 19th Centuries. As a social institution, freemasonry was a private society governed by brotherly love and social harmony; underlying this social vision, however, was a vibrant material culture that provided the basis for fraternal exchanges. Such exchanges provide insight into the ways in which masonic culture—as opposed to the institution itself—function on a more personal level, promoting individual masonic friendships that oftentimes transgressed social divisions caused by race and class.

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September
Brown Bag Constructing Empire: Fortifications, Politics, and Labor in an Age of Imperial Reform, 1689-1715 9 September 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jared Hardesty, Western Washington University Historians of the British North American Colonies consider the Age of the Glorious Revolution (1689 ...

Historians of the British North American Colonies consider the Age of the Glorious Revolution (1689-1715) a period of imperial reform.

Often overlooked, however, is that the English--and later British--fiscal-military state expanded into the American colonies mostly through an unprecedented campaign of fortification building.

Examining the construction of these forts and other defensive works, this project explores the intersection of labor and empire in colonial America. In many ways, the fortifications were microcosms of imperial reform and provide a lens into the British government's post-Glorious Revolution attempts to construct empire in its American colonies. Early modern empires had physical manifestations—forts, wharves, customs houses, etc.—in need of construction and had to recruit or coerce enough labor to complete those projects. Metropolitan designs and goals, however, were easier to propose than implement. As these fortifications demonstrate, labor was and had to be an integral component in these imperial calculations and only furthered the negotiated reality of empire in the American colonies.

details
More events
Brown Bag African Americans and the Cultural Work of Freemasonry: From Revolution Through Reconstruction 5 August 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Sueanna Smith, University of South Carolina

This talk will explore the print, manuscript, art, and artifact culture that freemasons created in the late 18th and 19th Centuries. As a social institution, freemasonry was a private society governed by brotherly love and social harmony; underlying this social vision, however, was a vibrant material culture that provided the basis for fraternal exchanges. Such exchanges provide insight into the ways in which masonic culture—as opposed to the institution itself—function on a more personal level, promoting individual masonic friendships that oftentimes transgressed social divisions caused by race and class.

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Brown Bag Constructing Empire: Fortifications, Politics, and Labor in an Age of Imperial Reform, 1689-1715 9 September 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Jared Hardesty, Western Washington University

Historians of the British North American Colonies consider the Age of the Glorious Revolution (1689-1715) a period of imperial reform.

Often overlooked, however, is that the English--and later British--fiscal-military state expanded into the American colonies mostly through an unprecedented campaign of fortification building.

Examining the construction of these forts and other defensive works, this project explores the intersection of labor and empire in colonial America. In many ways, the fortifications were microcosms of imperial reform and provide a lens into the British government's post-Glorious Revolution attempts to construct empire in its American colonies. Early modern empires had physical manifestations—forts, wharves, customs houses, etc.—in need of construction and had to recruit or coerce enough labor to complete those projects. Metropolitan designs and goals, however, were easier to propose than implement. As these fortifications demonstrate, labor was and had to be an integral component in these imperial calculations and only furthered the negotiated reality of empire in the American colonies.

close

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