Brown Bags

Exhibition

Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country

Massachusetts Women in WWI. 12 June 2014 to 24 January 2015

Details

February

Brown Bag Everyday Laureates: Community Poetry in New England, 1865-1900 4 February 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Erin Kappeler, MHS-NEH Research Fellow Why did the Brookline Whist Club leave behind a handwritten book of poems? What did the members of ...

Why did the Brookline Whist Club leave behind a handwritten book of poems? What did the members of the Boston Game Club think they were doing when they wrote and published poetic parodies and songs? This talk considers how and why members of late nineteenth-century social clubs wrote and circulated poetry. It argues that these poems were more than simple diversions, showing that these groups engaged with poetic forms in sophisticated ways in order to create a sense of community and place.

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March
Brown Bag John Quincy Adams and the Paradox of Anglo-American Relations in the Early Republic: The London Years, 1815-1817 4 March 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Robert Shimp, Boston University This talk will center on how John Quincy Adams’s experiences in London and Ealing as Minister ...

This talk will center on how John Quincy Adams’s experiences in London and Ealing as Minister Plenipotentiary to Great Britain came to influence his subsequent domestic career. Shimp argues that this period in Adams’s career can provide us with important insights into the paradoxical relationship that Adams and the United States maintained with Great Britain through the early national period. Such connections were significant for the second party system in the United States.

details
Brown Bag Networks of Faith and Finance: Boston’s Scottish Exile Community in the Later Seventeenth Century 18 March 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Craig Gallagher, Boston College Many Scots fled their native country to escape persecution at the hands of their monarch Charles II ...

Many Scots fled their native country to escape persecution at the hands of their monarch Charles II for their adherence to the Presbyterian faith. A significant number sought refuge in Boston, a city whose leaders they knew to be sympathetic to their plight and in which they spied a commercial opportunity. Between 1660 and 1689, they cultivated networks of faith and finance. Through their patrons in the Dutch and English Atlantic Worlds, these Scots were well placed to capitalize on political opportunities that emerged after the Glorious Revolution.

details
Brown Bag Allegiance and Protection: The Problem of Subjecthood in the Glorious Revolution, 1680-95 25 March 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Alex Jablonski, State University of New York at Binghamton This project explores the ways in which people in the British Isles and the American colonies ...

This project explores the ways in which people in the British Isles and the American colonies struggled to define their status as subjects of the English king in a decade whose political, religious, and cultural turmoil frustrated any simple answer. At its heart, this debate unfolded over the nature of obedience owed to a sovereign power, and as a result spilled from the narrow banks of legal theory onto a far broader plain of concerns about character and identity in a quite large and diverse empire.

details
April
Brown Bag Contesting the Centennial: Civil War Memory at the 1876 World's Fair 1 April 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Krista Kinslow, Boston University The 1876 Philadelphia Exhibition was promoted as a fair to show off American greatness. But at the ...

The 1876 Philadelphia Exhibition was promoted as a fair to show off American greatness. But at the same time, the Centennial exposed the rifts in society. Given that the Civil War had ended only eleven years before, a celebration of American unity and power bore a certain irony. Issues of the Civil War pervaded the Centennial Exhibition and this project explores the different ways in which Americans brought their particular memories of that war to Philadelphia. 

details
More events
Brown Bag Everyday Laureates: Community Poetry in New England, 1865-1900 4 February 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Erin Kappeler, MHS-NEH Research Fellow

Why did the Brookline Whist Club leave behind a handwritten book of poems? What did the members of the Boston Game Club think they were doing when they wrote and published poetic parodies and songs? This talk considers how and why members of late nineteenth-century social clubs wrote and circulated poetry. It argues that these poems were more than simple diversions, showing that these groups engaged with poetic forms in sophisticated ways in order to create a sense of community and place.

close
Brown Bag John Quincy Adams and the Paradox of Anglo-American Relations in the Early Republic: The London Years, 1815-1817 4 March 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Robert Shimp, Boston University

This talk will center on how John Quincy Adams’s experiences in London and Ealing as Minister Plenipotentiary to Great Britain came to influence his subsequent domestic career. Shimp argues that this period in Adams’s career can provide us with important insights into the paradoxical relationship that Adams and the United States maintained with Great Britain through the early national period. Such connections were significant for the second party system in the United States.

close
Brown Bag Networks of Faith and Finance: Boston’s Scottish Exile Community in the Later Seventeenth Century 18 March 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Craig Gallagher, Boston College

Many Scots fled their native country to escape persecution at the hands of their monarch Charles II for their adherence to the Presbyterian faith. A significant number sought refuge in Boston, a city whose leaders they knew to be sympathetic to their plight and in which they spied a commercial opportunity. Between 1660 and 1689, they cultivated networks of faith and finance. Through their patrons in the Dutch and English Atlantic Worlds, these Scots were well placed to capitalize on political opportunities that emerged after the Glorious Revolution.

close
Brown Bag Allegiance and Protection: The Problem of Subjecthood in the Glorious Revolution, 1680-95 25 March 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Alex Jablonski, State University of New York at Binghamton

This project explores the ways in which people in the British Isles and the American colonies struggled to define their status as subjects of the English king in a decade whose political, religious, and cultural turmoil frustrated any simple answer. At its heart, this debate unfolded over the nature of obedience owed to a sovereign power, and as a result spilled from the narrow banks of legal theory onto a far broader plain of concerns about character and identity in a quite large and diverse empire.

close
Brown Bag Contesting the Centennial: Civil War Memory at the 1876 World's Fair 1 April 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Krista Kinslow, Boston University

The 1876 Philadelphia Exhibition was promoted as a fair to show off American greatness. But at the same time, the Centennial exposed the rifts in society. Given that the Civil War had ended only eleven years before, a celebration of American unity and power bore a certain irony. Issues of the Civil War pervaded the Centennial Exhibition and this project explores the different ways in which Americans brought their particular memories of that war to Philadelphia. 

close

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