Press Releases

Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize Awarded to Kerri K. Greenidge

The Massachusetts Historical Society (MHS) has awarded the 2020 Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize to Kerri K. Greenidge for her book Black Radical: The Life and Times of William Monroe Trotter, published in 2019 by Liveright. The Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize is given to the best nonfiction work on the history of Massachusetts published during the preceding year. Greenidge will receive the award at an online event on Tuesday, February 9, 2021. After reviewing 14 submissions that interpret the history of Massachusetts through a wide range of subjects and time periods, the Peter J. Gomes Book Prize selection committee chose Black Radical as the winner this year. The committee notes that the book is “much more than a straight biography” because Greenidge “examines the subtle variation in ideology, beliefs, and tactics among numerous ...

Standing Up, Stepping Forward, & Speaking Out: The Political Courage to Take a Principled Stand with John Dean and William Weld on 9 September

Presented by the Massachusetts Historical Society, this virtual conversation will discuss those
who go against the grain to stand up against political corruption and white collar crimes.
BOSTON, August 2020—Watergate was a sea change in American politics. But even as a presidential scandal gripped the nation, there were remarkable displays of political courage as Republicans and Democrats found ways to work together for the good of the nation. On Wednesday, September 9, 2020, at 5:30 PM, the Massachusetts Historical Society (MHS) will host a conversation between John Dean and William Weld, for whom Watergate was a transformational moment. Moderated by historian Edward Widmer, the conversation will explore the need for honesty and political courage—even when that means breaking party ties or opposing friends. Hear from two people who ...

Monuments: Snapshots of an Ever-Changing Story

by Catherine Allgor, MHS President; Kanisorn Wongsrichanalai, MHS Director of Research; Elyssa Tardif, MHS Director of Education; and Kate Melchior, MHS Assistant Director of Education Americans have begun to reexamine the monuments that make up our civic landscape. While these discussions are not new, the recent protests over this country’s longstanding racial injustice have given them a new urgency and scope. Ultimately, each decision about the fate of a local monument will be decided by the people in that community, and we believe that the current dialogue is both valuable and timely. Indeed, as the nation’s first historical society, we applaud the increased interest in and conversations about historical artifacts, people, events, and monuments. As people in Massachusetts and across the country voice their understandings of the present-day ...

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Upcoming Events

Author Talk; Online Event

Bank Notes and Shinplasters: The Rage for Paper Money in the Early Republic

7Dec 5:30PM 2020
This is an online program

Before Civil War greenbacks and a national bank network established a uniform federal currency in the United States, loosely regulated banks saturated the early American ...

History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar; Online Event

“To Make Her Own Bargains with Boats:” Gender, Labor, and Freedom in the Western Steamboat ...

8Dec 5:15PM 2020
This is an online program

Free and enslaved Black women have been rendered nearly invisible in the historical andpopular imagination of the antebellum steamboat world. This essay examines how ...

Online Event; Special Event

MHS Holiday Celebration

9Dec 6:00PM 2020
This is an online program

All are welcome to join us for this FREE virtual event! Lights and gatherings are an especially meaningful symbol of hope, celebration, warmth, and remembrance for many ...

From our Blog

This Week @MHS

Join us for a program this week! Here is a look at what is going on: - Tuesday, 29 January, 5:15 PM: Better Teaching through Technology, 1945-1969, with Victoria Cain, Northeastern ...

Founder to Founder

Like so many good stories here at the Historical Society, it began with a reference question. Jeremy Belknap, hunting through his sources, asked Vice President John Adams for some help. Belknap, the ...

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