May 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/Winter_2020/Winter_2020/2129380928.jpg Author Talk, Conversation, Online Event The Lost Tradition of Economic Equality in America, 1600-1870 14 May 2020.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Daniel R. Mandell, Truman State University, in conversation with Liz Covart, Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture Although Americans today are concerned about the ever-increasing levels of wealth and income ...

Although Americans today are concerned about the ever-increasing levels of wealth and income Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Lost_tradition_of_equality_.jpginequality, many continue to believe that their country was founded on a person’s right to acquire and control property. But The Lost Tradition of Economic Equality argues that the US was originally deeply influenced by the belief that maintaining a “rough” equality of wealth was essential for a successful republican government. Author Daniel Mandell and Liz Covart will discuss Mandell's new book which explores this tradition from its English roots through Reconstruction.

Order the book here! Use code HTWN to receive 30% off the list price. 

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links and instructions on how to join the event. 

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets//Winter_2020/Leif_Erickson_marker.jpg Public Program, Online Event Misled: A Virtual Tour of Inaccurate Historical Markers 20 May 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. This program is now at capacity, registration is closed Gavin Kleespies, MHS Historical markers influence what and who we remember, but sometimes they aren't quite what that ...

Historical markers influence what and who we remember, but sometimes they aren't quite what that appear. Some are just wrong. Even in a city like Cambridge, Massachusetts, a place known world-wide as a home to rigorous scholarship, misleading and inaccurate historical markers can be found. While these markers don't always reflect the whole truth, sometimes the stories they tell offer important lessons about who gets to shape history.

This virtual tour will be presented by Gavin Kleespies, the Director of Programs, Exhibitions, and Community Partnerships at the MHS and will explore Cambridge's strange patchwork of unreliable markers including “mimic” houses, mislabeled trees and even a fake rock.

Please note, this is an online program.  Registrants will receive an email with links and instructions on how to join the event.

 

 

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Building Closed Memorial Day Weekend 23 May 2020.Saturday, all day The MHS is CLOSED for Memorial Day Weekend.

The MHS is CLOSED for Memorial Day Weekend.

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Building Closed Memorial Day 25 May 2020.Monday, all day The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Memorial Day.

The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Memorial Day.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets//Winter_2020/Lincoln_portrait.jpg Author Talk, Online Event Lincoln on the Verge: Thirteen Days to Washington 27 May 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Ted Widmer, Macaulay Honors College (CUNY) Historian and MHS Trustee,Ted Widmer presents his new book, Lincoln on the Verge, an ...

Historian and MHS Trustee,Ted Widmer presents his new book, Lincoln on the Verge, an account of the Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/lincoln-on-the-verge-9781476739434.jpgGreat Emancipator’s two-week journey to Washington as President-Elect and the deeply uncertain and perilous future he faced on his way to take the oath of office.

The government Lincoln was about to inherit was bankrupt and on the verge of collapse. To make matters worse, reliable intelligence confirmed a conspiracy to assassinate him as he passed through Baltimore. It is no exaggeration to say that the fate of the Republic hung in the balance as Southerners vowed to prevent Lincoln’s inauguration by any means necessary. Drawing on new research, including extensive work in the MHS archives, this account reveals Lincoln as a work in progress, showing him on the verge of greatness, foiling an assassination attempt, and forging an unbreakable bond with the American people.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links and instructions on how to join the program. Order the book here!

 

 

More
June 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/3b49106v.jpg Online Event, Author Talk Picturing Political Power: Images in the Women’s Suffrage Movement 3 June 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Allison K. Lange, Wentworth Institute of Technology, in conversation with Catherine Allgor, MHS REGISTER HERE Picturing Political Power offers a comprehensive analysis ...

REGISTER HERE

Picturing Political Power offers a comprehensive analysis of the connection between images, gender, and Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/41T_uYUhj2L__SX331_BO1_204_203_200_.jpgpower. This examination of the fights that led to the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment explores how suffragists pioneered one of the first extensive visual campaigns in modern American history. Prof. Allison Lange shows how pictures, from early engravings and photographs to colorful posters, proved central to suffragists’efforts to change expectations for women, fighting back against the accepted norms of their times. Picturing Political Power demonstrates the centrality of visual politics to American women’s campaigns throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, revealing the power of images to change history.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links and instructions on how to join the program.

Purchase the book here! Use code LANGE and receive 20% off the list price from June 3rd to September 3rd.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/cover_2_.jpg Author Talk, Online Event, Public Program Laid Waste! The Culture of Exploitation in Early America 5 June 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM This is an online program John Lauritz Larson, Purdue University REGISTER HERE After humble beginnings as faltering British colonies, the United ...

REGISTER HERE

After humble beginnings as faltering British colonies, the United States acquired astonishing wealth and power as the result of modernization. Originating in England and Western Europe, transplanted to the Americas, then copied around the world in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, this modernizing process locked together science and technology, political democracy, economic freedom, and competitive capitalism. This has produced unimagined wealth and material comfort for some, yet it has also now brought the global environment to a tipping point. John Larson analyzes the roots of an American “culture of exploitation” that has left us free, rich, and without an honest sense of how this crisis came to be.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/booksforidlehourscropped_1000.jpg Author Talk, Online Event, Public Program Books for Idle Hours: Nineteenth-Century Publishing and the Rise of Summer Reading 11 June 2020.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Donna Harrington-Lueker, Salve Regina University REGISTER HERE The publishing phenomenon of summer reading started in the ...

REGISTER HERE

The publishing phenomenon of summer reading started in the nineteenth century, as both print culture Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/81oEvBsQUOL__AC_US218__.jpgand tourist culture expanded in the United States. Drawing on publishing records, book reviews, readers’ diaries, and popular novels of the period, Donna Harrington-Lueker explores the beginning of summer reading and the backlash against it. Countering fears about the dangers of leisurely reading—especially for young women—publishers framed summer reading not as a disreputable habit but as a respectable pastime and welcome respite. Harrington-Lueker works to shed new light on an ongoing seasonal publishing tradition.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the event. 

Order the book here! Use code S772 to receive 30% off the list price.

 

 

 

 

More
Exhibition, Revolution 250ends Fire! Voices From the Boston Massacre 12 June 2020.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Gallery hours are: Mon., Wed., Thu., Fri., and Sat.: 10:00 am to 4:00 pm and Tue.: 10:00 am to 7:00 pm. On the evening of March 5, 1770, soldiers occupying the town of Boston shot into a crowd, killing or ...

On the evening of March 5, 1770, soldiers occupying the town of Boston shot into a crowd, killing or fatally wounding five civilians.

In the aftermath of what soon became known as the Boston Massacre, questions about the command to “Fire!” became crucial. Who yelled it? When and why? Because the answers would determine the guilt or innocence of the soldiers, defense counsel John Adams insisted that “Facts are stubborn things.”

But what are the facts? The evidence, often contradictory, drew upon testimony from dozens of witnesses. Come learn about the Boston Massacre and “hear” for yourself—through a selection of artifacts, eyewitness accounts, and trial testimony—the voices of ordinary men and women, and discover how this flashpoint changed American history.

Learn more about the Massacre on our companion website.

More
Author Talk, Conversation, Online Event The Lost Tradition of Economic Equality in America, 1600-1870 14 May 2020.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Daniel R. Mandell, Truman State University, in conversation with Liz Covart, Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/Winter_2020/Winter_2020/2129380928.jpg

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

Although Americans today are concerned about the ever-increasing levels of wealth and income Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Lost_tradition_of_equality_.jpginequality, many continue to believe that their country was founded on a person’s right to acquire and control property. But The Lost Tradition of Economic Equality argues that the US was originally deeply influenced by the belief that maintaining a “rough” equality of wealth was essential for a successful republican government. Author Daniel Mandell and Liz Covart will discuss Mandell's new book which explores this tradition from its English roots through Reconstruction.

Order the book here! Use code HTWN to receive 30% off the list price. 

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links and instructions on how to join the event. 

 

 

close

Public Program, Online Event Misled: A Virtual Tour of Inaccurate Historical Markers 20 May 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. This program is now at capacity, registration is closed Gavin Kleespies, MHS Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets//Winter_2020/Leif_Erickson_marker.jpg

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

Historical markers influence what and who we remember, but sometimes they aren't quite what that appear. Some are just wrong. Even in a city like Cambridge, Massachusetts, a place known world-wide as a home to rigorous scholarship, misleading and inaccurate historical markers can be found. While these markers don't always reflect the whole truth, sometimes the stories they tell offer important lessons about who gets to shape history.

This virtual tour will be presented by Gavin Kleespies, the Director of Programs, Exhibitions, and Community Partnerships at the MHS and will explore Cambridge's strange patchwork of unreliable markers including “mimic” houses, mislabeled trees and even a fake rock.

Please note, this is an online program.  Registrants will receive an email with links and instructions on how to join the event.

 

 

close

Building Closed Memorial Day Weekend 23 May 2020.Saturday, all day

The MHS is CLOSED for Memorial Day Weekend.

close

Building Closed Memorial Day 25 May 2020.Monday, all day

The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Memorial Day.

close

Author Talk, Online Event Lincoln on the Verge: Thirteen Days to Washington 27 May 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Ted Widmer, Macaulay Honors College (CUNY) Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets//Winter_2020/Lincoln_portrait.jpg

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

Historian and MHS Trustee,Ted Widmer presents his new book, Lincoln on the Verge, an account of the Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/lincoln-on-the-verge-9781476739434.jpgGreat Emancipator’s two-week journey to Washington as President-Elect and the deeply uncertain and perilous future he faced on his way to take the oath of office.

The government Lincoln was about to inherit was bankrupt and on the verge of collapse. To make matters worse, reliable intelligence confirmed a conspiracy to assassinate him as he passed through Baltimore. It is no exaggeration to say that the fate of the Republic hung in the balance as Southerners vowed to prevent Lincoln’s inauguration by any means necessary. Drawing on new research, including extensive work in the MHS archives, this account reveals Lincoln as a work in progress, showing him on the verge of greatness, foiling an assassination attempt, and forging an unbreakable bond with the American people.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links and instructions on how to join the program. Order the book here!

 

 

close

Online Event, Author Talk Picturing Political Power: Images in the Women’s Suffrage Movement 3 June 2020.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Allison K. Lange, Wentworth Institute of Technology, in conversation with Catherine Allgor, MHS Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/3b49106v.jpg

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

REGISTER HERE

Picturing Political Power offers a comprehensive analysis of the connection between images, gender, and Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/41T_uYUhj2L__SX331_BO1_204_203_200_.jpgpower. This examination of the fights that led to the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment explores how suffragists pioneered one of the first extensive visual campaigns in modern American history. Prof. Allison Lange shows how pictures, from early engravings and photographs to colorful posters, proved central to suffragists’efforts to change expectations for women, fighting back against the accepted norms of their times. Picturing Political Power demonstrates the centrality of visual politics to American women’s campaigns throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, revealing the power of images to change history.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links and instructions on how to join the program.

Purchase the book here! Use code LANGE and receive 20% off the list price from June 3rd to September 3rd.

close

Author Talk, Online Event, Public Program Laid Waste! The Culture of Exploitation in Early America 5 June 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM This is an online program John Lauritz Larson, Purdue University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/cover_2_.jpg

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

REGISTER HERE

After humble beginnings as faltering British colonies, the United States acquired astonishing wealth and power as the result of modernization. Originating in England and Western Europe, transplanted to the Americas, then copied around the world in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, this modernizing process locked together science and technology, political democracy, economic freedom, and competitive capitalism. This has produced unimagined wealth and material comfort for some, yet it has also now brought the global environment to a tipping point. John Larson analyzes the roots of an American “culture of exploitation” that has left us free, rich, and without an honest sense of how this crisis came to be.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Author Talk, Online Event, Public Program Books for Idle Hours: Nineteenth-Century Publishing and the Rise of Summer Reading 11 June 2020.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Donna Harrington-Lueker, Salve Regina University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/booksforidlehourscropped_1000.jpg

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

REGISTER HERE

The publishing phenomenon of summer reading started in the nineteenth century, as both print culture Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/81oEvBsQUOL__AC_US218__.jpgand tourist culture expanded in the United States. Drawing on publishing records, book reviews, readers’ diaries, and popular novels of the period, Donna Harrington-Lueker explores the beginning of summer reading and the backlash against it. Countering fears about the dangers of leisurely reading—especially for young women—publishers framed summer reading not as a disreputable habit but as a respectable pastime and welcome respite. Harrington-Lueker works to shed new light on an ongoing seasonal publishing tradition.

Please note, this is an online event. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the event. 

Order the book here! Use code S772 to receive 30% off the list price.

 

 

 

 

close

Exhibition, Revolution 250 Fire! Voices From the Boston Massacre Gallery hours are: Mon., Wed., Thu., Fri., and Sat.: 10:00 am to 4:00 pm and Tue.: 10:00 am to 7:00 pm.

On the evening of March 5, 1770, soldiers occupying the town of Boston shot into a crowd, killing or fatally wounding five civilians.

In the aftermath of what soon became known as the Boston Massacre, questions about the command to “Fire!” became crucial. Who yelled it? When and why? Because the answers would determine the guilt or innocence of the soldiers, defense counsel John Adams insisted that “Facts are stubborn things.”

But what are the facts? The evidence, often contradictory, drew upon testimony from dozens of witnesses. Come learn about the Boston Massacre and “hear” for yourself—through a selection of artifacts, eyewitness accounts, and trial testimony—the voices of ordinary men and women, and discover how this flashpoint changed American history.

Learn more about the Massacre on our companion website.

close