Research seminars--conversations with one or more presenters that usually focus on a precirculated paper--take place between late September and early May. Programs are offered in five different series: the Boston Area Early American History Seminar, the Boston Environmental History Seminar, the Boston Seminar on Modern American Society and Culture, the Boston Seminar on the History of Women and Gender, and the New England Biography Seminar. Learn more about each series and subscribe to receive advance copies of the papers that will be discussed.

 

RSVP required. Please email seminars@masshist.org or phone 617-646-0579.

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December 2019
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//wgs_banner.jpg History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar Dr. Ana Livia Cordero, Social Medicine, and the Puerto Rican Liberation Struggle 17 December 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Sandy Placido, Queens College, CUNY Comment: Susan Reverby, Wellesley College Born in San Juan in 1931, Ana Livia Cordero was a trailblazing physician and activist-intellectual ...

Born in San Juan in 1931, Ana Livia Cordero was a trailblazing physician and activist-intellectual whose life illuminates the crucial role Puerto Ricans played in Cold War-era freedom struggles. Cordero worked as a physician, public health advocate, and radical organizer in New York, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Ghana, Egypt, and Nicaragua for over four decades. Using a new framework of feminist social medicine, this essay examines Cordero’s contributions to the field of social medicine, particularly maternal and children’s health.

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January 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar Supplying Slavery: Jamaica and British Imperial Trade, 1752-1769 7 January 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Peter Pellizzari, Harvard University Comment: Richard Dunn, American Philosophical Society Historians have long understood the economic importance of Jamaica to the eighteenth-century British ...

Historians have long understood the economic importance of Jamaica to the eighteenth-century British empire, but the vast profits that the island's sugar-slave complexes produced could only have existed with the supplies and provisions provided by mainland colonists in North America. Newly collected data from nearly 10,000 British naval office shipping lists for Kingston, Jamaica provide a re-assessment of the size, nature, and value of this trade. The shipping lists reveal not only how deeply committed the mainland was to supplying Jamaican slavery, but also suggests that we reconsider the island as a powerful regional hub within the larger British Atlantic economy, one in which North America figured as an important hinterland.

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History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar Dr. Ana Livia Cordero, Social Medicine, and the Puerto Rican Liberation Struggle 17 December 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Sandy Placido, Queens College, CUNY Comment: Susan Reverby, Wellesley College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//wgs_banner.jpg

Born in San Juan in 1931, Ana Livia Cordero was a trailblazing physician and activist-intellectual whose life illuminates the crucial role Puerto Ricans played in Cold War-era freedom struggles. Cordero worked as a physician, public health advocate, and radical organizer in New York, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Ghana, Egypt, and Nicaragua for over four decades. Using a new framework of feminist social medicine, this essay examines Cordero’s contributions to the field of social medicine, particularly maternal and children’s health.

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Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar Supplying Slavery: Jamaica and British Imperial Trade, 1752-1769 7 January 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Peter Pellizzari, Harvard University Comment: Richard Dunn, American Philosophical Society Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg

Historians have long understood the economic importance of Jamaica to the eighteenth-century British empire, but the vast profits that the island's sugar-slave complexes produced could only have existed with the supplies and provisions provided by mainland colonists in North America. Newly collected data from nearly 10,000 British naval office shipping lists for Kingston, Jamaica provide a re-assessment of the size, nature, and value of this trade. The shipping lists reveal not only how deeply committed the mainland was to supplying Jamaican slavery, but also suggests that we reconsider the island as a powerful regional hub within the larger British Atlantic economy, one in which North America figured as an important hinterland.

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