Research seminars--conversations with one or more presenters that usually focus on a precirculated paper--take place between late September and early May. Programs are offered in five different series: the Boston Area Early American History Seminar, the Boston Environmental History Seminar, the Boston Seminar on Modern American Society and Culture, the Boston Seminar on the History of Women and Gender, and the New England Biography Seminar. Learn more about each series and subscribe to receive advance copies of the papers that will be discussed.

 

RSVP required. Please email seminars@masshist.org or phone 617-646-0579.

Back to today
December 2019
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//wgs_banner.jpg History of Women and Gender Seminar Dr. Ana Livia Cordero, Social Medicine, and the Puerto Rican Liberation Struggle 17 December 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Sandy Placido, Queens College, CUNY Born in San Juan in 1931, Ana Livia Cordero was a trailblazing physician and activist-intellectual ...

Born in San Juan in 1931, Ana Livia Cordero was a trailblazing physician and activist-intellectual whose life illuminates the crucial role Puerto Ricans played in Cold War-era freedom struggles. Cordero worked as a physician, public health advocate, and radical organizer in New York, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Ghana, Egypt, and Nicaragua for over four decades. Using a new framework of feminist social medicine, this essay examines Cordero’s contributions to the field of social medicine, particularly maternal and children’s health.

More
More events
History of Women and Gender Seminar Dr. Ana Livia Cordero, Social Medicine, and the Puerto Rican Liberation Struggle Register registration required at no cost 17 December 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Sandy Placido, Queens College, CUNY Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//wgs_banner.jpg

Born in San Juan in 1931, Ana Livia Cordero was a trailblazing physician and activist-intellectual whose life illuminates the crucial role Puerto Ricans played in Cold War-era freedom struggles. Cordero worked as a physician, public health advocate, and radical organizer in New York, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Ghana, Egypt, and Nicaragua for over four decades. Using a new framework of feminist social medicine, this essay examines Cordero’s contributions to the field of social medicine, particularly maternal and children’s health.

close


    Key to event colors:
  • MHS Tours
  • Seminars
  • Public Programs
  • Brown Bags
  • Special Events