Research seminars--conversations with one or more presenters that usually focus on a precirculated paper--take place between late September and early May. Programs are offered in five different series: the Boston Area Early American History Seminar, the Boston Environmental History Seminar, the Boston Seminar on Modern American Society and Culture, the Boston Seminar on the History of Women and Gender, and the New England Biography Seminar. Learn more about each series and subscribe to receive advance copies of the papers that will be discussed.

 

RSVP required. Please email seminars@masshist.org or phone 617-646-0579.

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November 2019
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//eahs_banner.jpg Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar Murder at the Manhattan Well: The Personal and the Political in the Election of 1800 19 November 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Paul Gilje, University of Oklahoma Kate Grandjean, Wellesley College In 1800, journeyman carpenter, Levi Weeks, was accused of murdering Guliema Sands, a young woman ...

In 1800, journeyman carpenter, Levi Weeks, was accused of murdering Guliema Sands, a young woman living in the same boarding house. Using the trial transcript, this paper places the lives of Weeks and Sands in a larger context: Weeks as an artisan in a dynamic economy and Sands as a poor unattached woman amidst changing ideas about sexuality. The author also relates the trial to the New York election that occurred a month later.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//banner_draft_2.jpg African American History Seminar Mary Church Terrell’s Intersectional Black Feminism 21 November 2019.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Alison M. Parker, University of Delaware Kerri Greenidge, Tufts University Civil rights activist Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954) highlighted the intersections of race and sex ...

Civil rights activist Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954) highlighted the intersections of race and sex in black women’s lives. This paper focuses on Terrell’s critiques of the suffrage movement, the social purity movement, and the postbellum white nostalgia for “Black Mammies.” Terrell asserted black women’s right to be full citizens, to vote, and to be treated without violence and with respect.

This session is co-sponsored by the New England Biography Series.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//masc_banner.jpg Modern American Society and Culture Seminar Navigating Colonial, Racial, and Indigenous Histories on the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail 26 November 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Laura Barraclough, Yale University Maria John, University of Massachusetts - Boston Launched by Congress in 1978, the National Historic Trail (NHT) system recognizes historic travel ...

Launched by Congress in 1978, the National Historic Trail (NHT) system recognizes historic travel routes that contributed to the making of the United States. This paper examines the collision of colonial, racial, and indigenous histories on the Juan Bautista de Anza NHT, which commemorates the 1775-76 expedition of Mexican settlers from Sonora to San Francisco. While the Anza NHT has been empowering to contemporary Mexican Americans, it struggles to fairly represent the layered impacts of Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. colonization on the region’s Native peoples.

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December 2019
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//ehs_banner.jpg Environmental History Seminar Climate in Words and Numbers: How Early Americans Recorded Weather in Almanacs 3 December 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Event Cancelled due to weather Joyce Chaplin, Harvard University With support from the Guggenheim Foundation, Joyce Chaplin is compiling a database of manuscript ...

With support from the Guggenheim Foundation, Joyce Chaplin is compiling a database of manuscript notes about weather in early American almanacs, 1647-1820. Her talk focuses on how people recorded weather in numbers (including degrees Fahrenheit) and in words, ranging from “dull” to “elegant!” These notations are significant as records of a period of climate change, the Little Ice Age, also as records of how people made sense of and coped with that climatic disruption.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//eahs_banner.jpg Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar Who Was “One-Eyed” Sarah? Searching for an Indigenous Nurse in Local Government 10 December 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Gabriel J. Loiacono, University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh Comment: Cornelia Dayton, University of Connecticut This essay considers the life of an indigenous woman, known as “One-Eyed” Sarah, who ...

This essay considers the life of an indigenous woman, known as “One-Eyed” Sarah, who provided full-time nursing care to poor communities in early nineteenth-century Providence, RI. The only historical sources that describe Sarah’s work never provide her last name or details beyond the description “Indian.” So who was she, and how do we tell her story? Using sometimes patchy sources of non-elite people, the author hopes to gain new insights into social welfare history and explore how ordinary women made the poor law function.

More
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Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar Murder at the Manhattan Well: The Personal and the Political in the Election of 1800 19 November 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Paul Gilje, University of Oklahoma Kate Grandjean, Wellesley College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//eahs_banner.jpg

In 1800, journeyman carpenter, Levi Weeks, was accused of murdering Guliema Sands, a young woman living in the same boarding house. Using the trial transcript, this paper places the lives of Weeks and Sands in a larger context: Weeks as an artisan in a dynamic economy and Sands as a poor unattached woman amidst changing ideas about sexuality. The author also relates the trial to the New York election that occurred a month later.

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African American History Seminar Mary Church Terrell’s Intersectional Black Feminism 21 November 2019.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Alison M. Parker, University of Delaware Kerri Greenidge, Tufts University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//banner_draft_2.jpg

Civil rights activist Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954) highlighted the intersections of race and sex in black women’s lives. This paper focuses on Terrell’s critiques of the suffrage movement, the social purity movement, and the postbellum white nostalgia for “Black Mammies.” Terrell asserted black women’s right to be full citizens, to vote, and to be treated without violence and with respect.

This session is co-sponsored by the New England Biography Series.

close

Modern American Society and Culture Seminar Navigating Colonial, Racial, and Indigenous Histories on the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail 26 November 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Laura Barraclough, Yale University Maria John, University of Massachusetts - Boston Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//masc_banner.jpg

Launched by Congress in 1978, the National Historic Trail (NHT) system recognizes historic travel routes that contributed to the making of the United States. This paper examines the collision of colonial, racial, and indigenous histories on the Juan Bautista de Anza NHT, which commemorates the 1775-76 expedition of Mexican settlers from Sonora to San Francisco. While the Anza NHT has been empowering to contemporary Mexican Americans, it struggles to fairly represent the layered impacts of Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. colonization on the region’s Native peoples.

close

Environmental History Seminar Climate in Words and Numbers: How Early Americans Recorded Weather in Almanacs 3 December 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Event Cancelled due to weather Joyce Chaplin, Harvard University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//ehs_banner.jpg

With support from the Guggenheim Foundation, Joyce Chaplin is compiling a database of manuscript notes about weather in early American almanacs, 1647-1820. Her talk focuses on how people recorded weather in numbers (including degrees Fahrenheit) and in words, ranging from “dull” to “elegant!” These notations are significant as records of a period of climate change, the Little Ice Age, also as records of how people made sense of and coped with that climatic disruption.

close

Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar Who Was “One-Eyed” Sarah? Searching for an Indigenous Nurse in Local Government Register registration required at no cost 10 December 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Gabriel J. Loiacono, University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh Comment: Cornelia Dayton, University of Connecticut Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//eahs_banner.jpg

This essay considers the life of an indigenous woman, known as “One-Eyed” Sarah, who provided full-time nursing care to poor communities in early nineteenth-century Providence, RI. The only historical sources that describe Sarah’s work never provide her last name or details beyond the description “Indian.” So who was she, and how do we tell her story? Using sometimes patchy sources of non-elite people, the author hopes to gain new insights into social welfare history and explore how ordinary women made the poor law function.

close


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