Research seminars--conversations with one or more presenters that usually focus on a precirculated paper--take place between late September and early May. Programs are offered in five different series: the Boston Area Early American History Seminar, the Boston Environmental History Seminar, the Boston Seminar on Modern American Society and Culture, the Boston Seminar on the History of Women and Gender, and the New England Biography Seminar. Learn more about each series and subscribe to receive advance copies of the papers that will be discussed.

 

RSVP required. Please email seminars@masshist.org or phone 617-646-0579.

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September 2019
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/masc_banner.jpg Modern American Society and Culture Seminar Fifty Shades of Green: Sexing Economics 24 September 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Bethany Moreton, Dartmouth College Nancy Cott, Harvard University From the Full Gospel Businessmen’s Fellowship to the Chicago School, thinkers on the Right ...

From the Full Gospel Businessmen’s Fellowship to the Chicago School, thinkers on the Right have vigorously theorized the foundational connections between sexual and economic ideologies, even while self-identified partisans of labor democracy scold radicals for “trying to persuade people on the left that gay issues, black issues, feminist issues and so on are all really about capitalism.” What happens when we consider economic “science” as a chapter in the history of sexuality?

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//eahs_banner.jpg Early American History Seminar Toward the Sistercentennial: New Light on Women’s Participation in the American Revolution 26 September 2019.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Woody Holton, University of South Carolina Mary Bilder, Boston College Law This essay offers new insight on some of the iconic stories of women’s involvement in the ...

This essay offers new insight on some of the iconic stories of women’s involvement in the American Revolution. For example, it (1) documents disputes among the Patriot boycotters of 1769 and 1770 (male vs. female, enslaved vs. free, and northern vs. southern) and 2) describes the male-on-male conflicts that led to and resulted from Esther Reed’s famous Ladies Association of 1780.

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October 2019
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//ehs_banner.jpg Environmental History Seminar Brighton Fair: The Animal Suburb and the Making of Modern Boston 8 October 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Andrew Robichaud, Boston University Zachary Nowak, Harvard University In the nineteenth century, Brighton, Massachusetts became an iconic center of livestock and animal ...

In the nineteenth century, Brighton, Massachusetts became an iconic center of livestock and animal industries in North America. Andrew Robichaud explores the political and environmental dimensions of the rise and fall of this “animal suburb,” and explains its significance, both then and now.

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//banner_draft_2.jpg African American History Seminar “A New Game”: The Invention of the N-Word Phrase 10 October 2019.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Elizabeth Pryor, Smith College Randall Kennedy, Harvard Law In the 1980s and 1990s, Black intellectuals increasingly refused to repeat the violent language ...

In the 1980s and 1990s, Black intellectuals increasingly refused to repeat the violent language wielded against them. Thus, they invented the “n” word phrase, placing the racist slur n***er at the center of debates over political correctness and Black cultural expression. By exploring the long history of African American protest against the n-word, this reflection examines how the surrogate phrase straddles Black radicalism on one hand and respectability politics on the other.

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Modern American Society and Culture Seminar Fifty Shades of Green: Sexing Economics Register registration required at no cost 24 September 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Bethany Moreton, Dartmouth College Nancy Cott, Harvard University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/masc_banner.jpg

From the Full Gospel Businessmen’s Fellowship to the Chicago School, thinkers on the Right have vigorously theorized the foundational connections between sexual and economic ideologies, even while self-identified partisans of labor democracy scold radicals for “trying to persuade people on the left that gay issues, black issues, feminist issues and so on are all really about capitalism.” What happens when we consider economic “science” as a chapter in the history of sexuality?

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Early American History Seminar Toward the Sistercentennial: New Light on Women’s Participation in the American Revolution Register registration required at no cost 26 September 2019.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Woody Holton, University of South Carolina Mary Bilder, Boston College Law Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//eahs_banner.jpg

This essay offers new insight on some of the iconic stories of women’s involvement in the American Revolution. For example, it (1) documents disputes among the Patriot boycotters of 1769 and 1770 (male vs. female, enslaved vs. free, and northern vs. southern) and 2) describes the male-on-male conflicts that led to and resulted from Esther Reed’s famous Ladies Association of 1780.

close

Environmental History Seminar Brighton Fair: The Animal Suburb and the Making of Modern Boston Register registration required at no cost 8 October 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Andrew Robichaud, Boston University Zachary Nowak, Harvard University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//ehs_banner.jpg

In the nineteenth century, Brighton, Massachusetts became an iconic center of livestock and animal industries in North America. Andrew Robichaud explores the political and environmental dimensions of the rise and fall of this “animal suburb,” and explains its significance, both then and now.

close

African American History Seminar “A New Game”: The Invention of the N-Word Phrase Register registration required at no cost 10 October 2019.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Elizabeth Pryor, Smith College Randall Kennedy, Harvard Law Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020//banner_draft_2.jpg

In the 1980s and 1990s, Black intellectuals increasingly refused to repeat the violent language wielded against them. Thus, they invented the “n” word phrase, placing the racist slur n***er at the center of debates over political correctness and Black cultural expression. By exploring the long history of African American protest against the n-word, this reflection examines how the surrogate phrase straddles Black radicalism on one hand and respectability politics on the other.

close


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