Seminars

Extended
to May 26

Exhibition

The Private Jefferson

Explore Jefferson’s complexity through select correspondence and writings including the Declaration of Independence, records of farming at Monticello, and his architectural drawings.

Details

Research seminars--conversations with one or more presenters that usually focus on a precirculated paper--take place between late September and early May. Programs are offered in five different series: the Boston Area Early American History Seminar, the Boston Environmental History Seminar, the Boston Immigration and Urban History Seminar, the Boston Seminar on the History of Women and Gender, and the New England Biography Seminar. Learn more about each series and subscribe to receive advance copies of the papers that will be discussed.

 

RSVP required. Please email seminars@masshist.org or phone 617-646-0568.

May

Early American History Seminar “They bid me speak what I thought he would give”: The Commodification of Captive Peoples during King Phillip’s War 3 May 2016.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Joanne Jahnke Wegner, University of Minnesota Comment: Kate Grandjean, Wellesley College This essay will address the systems of human trafficking that circulated both Native American and ...

This essay will address the systems of human trafficking that circulated both Native American and English captives during King Phillip’s War. Using the examples of Mary Rowlandson and King Phillip’s nameless son, the study explores the processes that turned captive peoples into commodities exchangeable for currency, material goods, or other humans. It argues that this commodification facilitated the circulation, exchange, and exploitation of captive peoples through human trafficking during King Phillip’s War.

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Early American History Seminar “They bid me speak what I thought he would give”: The Commodification of Captive Peoples during King Phillip’s War Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
3 May 2016.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Joanne Jahnke Wegner, University of Minnesota Comment: Kate Grandjean, Wellesley College

This essay will address the systems of human trafficking that circulated both Native American and English captives during King Phillip’s War. Using the examples of Mary Rowlandson and King Phillip’s nameless son, the study explores the processes that turned captive peoples into commodities exchangeable for currency, material goods, or other humans. It argues that this commodification facilitated the circulation, exchange, and exploitation of captive peoples through human trafficking during King Phillip’s War.

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