Research seminars--conversations with one or more presenters that usually focus on a precirculated paper--take place between late September and early May. Programs are offered in five different series: the Boston Area Early American History Seminar, the Boston Environmental History Seminar, the Boston Immigration and Urban History Seminar, the Boston Seminar on the History of Women and Gender, and the New England Biography Seminar. Learn more about each series and subscribe to receive advance copies of the papers that will be discussed.

 

RSVP required. Please email seminars@masshist.org or phone 617-646-0568.

May

Early American History Seminar Panel: Nathaniel Hawthorne and Friends 2 May 2017.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Philip Gould, Brown University, and Thomas Balcerski, Eastern Connecticut State University Comment: Maurice Lee, Boston University Gould’s essay, “Hawthorne and the State of War,” reads the under-studied travel ...

Gould’s essay, “Hawthorne and the State of War,” reads the under-studied travel memoir Our Old Home (1863) as a meditation on the important—and, as he saw it, troubling—transformation of state power during the US Civil War. Balcerski’s essay, “‘A Work of Friendship’: Nathaniel Hawthorne, Franklin Pierce, and the Politics of Literary History,” traces the evolution of their conjoined personal and political friendship from 1852 to 1864 and argues for its significance during this final phase of their public lives.

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Environmental History Seminar Canceled: Harvest for War: Fruits, Nuts, Imperialism, and Gas Mask Manufacture in the United States During World War I 9 May 2017.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Gerald Fitzgerald, George Mason University Nicoletta Gullace, University of New Hampshire This session was previously scheduled for Tuesday, February 21, 2017. Part of a ...

This session was previously scheduled for Tuesday, February 21, 2017.

Part of a larger book length study, this essay examines the use of seemingly exotic foodstuffs and industrial waste in the form of fruit pits for the manufacture of a high-density carbon filter critical for defense against chemical weapons. It involves not only environmental and military history but also the history of science and biology. The essay includes analysis of transportation networks within the context of 19th-century US imperialism, especially from a resource allocation perspective.

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Environmental History Seminar The Winter Workscape: Weather and the Meaning of Industrial Capitalism in the Northern Forest, 1850-1950 16 May 2017.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Jason L. Newton, Syracuse University Comment: Richard W. Judd, University of Maine This session was previously scheduled for March 14, 2017. Industrial logging ...

This session was previously scheduled for March 14, 2017.

Industrial logging operators used the winter weather, wood, simple machines, and muscle power alone to increase the production and transportation of saw logs to reach industrial scale and efficiency. Drawing on methods from environmental and labor history and the history of slavery and capitalism, this essay characterizes industrial capitalism as a force that will sustain seemingly anachronistic modes of production as long as they remain profitable. It shows that increased efficiency and scale need not always lead to massive carbon emissions.

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Early American History Seminar Panel: Nathaniel Hawthorne and Friends Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
2 May 2017.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Philip Gould, Brown University, and Thomas Balcerski, Eastern Connecticut State University Comment: Maurice Lee, Boston University

Gould’s essay, “Hawthorne and the State of War,” reads the under-studied travel memoir Our Old Home (1863) as a meditation on the important—and, as he saw it, troubling—transformation of state power during the US Civil War. Balcerski’s essay, “‘A Work of Friendship’: Nathaniel Hawthorne, Franklin Pierce, and the Politics of Literary History,” traces the evolution of their conjoined personal and political friendship from 1852 to 1864 and argues for its significance during this final phase of their public lives.

close
Environmental History Seminar Canceled:
Harvest for War: Fruits, Nuts, Imperialism, and Gas Mask Manufacture in the United States During World War I
Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.
9 May 2017.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Gerald Fitzgerald, George Mason University Nicoletta Gullace, University of New Hampshire

This session was previously scheduled for Tuesday, February 21, 2017.

Part of a larger book length study, this essay examines the use of seemingly exotic foodstuffs and industrial waste in the form of fruit pits for the manufacture of a high-density carbon filter critical for defense against chemical weapons. It involves not only environmental and military history but also the history of science and biology. The essay includes analysis of transportation networks within the context of 19th-century US imperialism, especially from a resource allocation perspective.

close
Environmental History Seminar The Winter Workscape: Weather and the Meaning of Industrial Capitalism in the Northern Forest, 1850-1950 this event is free 16 May 2017.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Jason L. Newton, Syracuse University Comment: Richard W. Judd, University of Maine

This session was previously scheduled for March 14, 2017.

Industrial logging operators used the winter weather, wood, simple machines, and muscle power alone to increase the production and transportation of saw logs to reach industrial scale and efficiency. Drawing on methods from environmental and labor history and the history of slavery and capitalism, this essay characterizes industrial capitalism as a force that will sustain seemingly anachronistic modes of production as long as they remain profitable. It shows that increased efficiency and scale need not always lead to massive carbon emissions.

close