The MHS offers many engaging programs and special events.

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October 2019
Special Event Opening Our Doors Celebration 14 October 2019.Monday, 10:00AM - 5:00PM The MHS will join its neighboring cultural institutions for a day of free history, art, music, and ...

The MHS will join its neighboring cultural institutions for a day of free history, art, music, and cultural happenings in the Fenway neighborhood. With over 20 different museums, venues, colleges, and organizations participating, there will be something for everyone. View Fenway Connections, an exhibition put together by the MHS and the Fenway Studios, take part in a family-friendly art project that is part of our Remember Abigail celebration, and join us for a historic walking tour of the Fenway neighborhood. 

Click here to register for the 11am walking tour of the Fenway neighborhood.

Click here to register for the 2pm walking tour of the Fenway neighborhood.

 

 

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Public Program Housing as History: Villa Victoria and the Fenway Community Development Corporation 16 October 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Mario Luis Small, Grafstein Professor of Sociology, Harvard University; Mathew Thall, founding Executive Director, Fenway CDC; Mayra I. Negrón-Roche, COO, Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción Location: Blackstone Community Center, 50 W. Brookline St, Boston, MA 02118. In the 1960s and 1970s Boston struggled to stem urban flight and a landscape of deteriorating ...

In the 1960s and 1970s Boston struggled to stem urban flight and a landscape of deteriorating housing stock. Massive redevelopment projects, such as the razing of the West End, sent shockwaves through the city. By the mid-1960s, the South End found itself the focus of redevelopment plans. A group of mostly Puerto Rican residents began to meet and then incorporated as the Emergency Tenants’ Council, which became Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción, Inc. (IBA). In 1969, following a widespread campaign, the IBA won the right to serve as the developer for their neighborhood and; using the architecture of Puerto Rico as inspiration, built Villa Victoria. A few years later and few blocks away, the Fenway neighborhood faced the Fenway Urban Renewal Plan (FURP), which planned to clear sections of the neighborhood. local residents sued the city to block FURP and won the right to have a neighborhood-elected board become part of the decision-making process. Out of these efforts came the Fenway CDC with a mission to develop and maintain affordable housing and advocate on behalf of a vibrant and diverse community.

Please note: This program will be held at Blackstone Community Center, 50 W. Brookline St, Boston, MA 02118.

This program is made possible by the generosity of Mass Humanities and the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University.

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Public Program Legacies of 1619: Afro-Native Connections 19 October 2019.Saturday, 4:00PM - 5:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 3:30. Christine DeLucia, Williams College; Kendra Field, Tufts University; and moderator Catherine Allgor, MHS Even before the arrival of enslaved Africans, Native Americans were forced into bondage and ...

Even before the arrival of enslaved Africans, Native Americans were forced into bondage and transported far from their homes in North America. Even as the Native populations were decimated and displaced, the communities that survived remained a refuge for African Americans. These distinct communities forged familial, social, and cultural bonds with each other over time. This program will explore the complex relationship between African Americans, Native Americans, the institution of slavery, and these groups’ attempts to seek equal rights in American society.

This program is part two of a four program series titled Legacies of 1619. The series is a production of the Massachusetts Historical Society and is co-sponsored by the Museum of African American History and the Roxbury Community College.

  

 

More
Public Program Saving America’s Cities: Ed Logue & the Struggle to Renew Urban America in the Suburban Age 21 October 2019.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Lizabeth Cohen, Harvard University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Edward J. Logue was a giant of 20th-century East Coast urban redevelopment. From the 1950s through ...

Edward J. Logue was a giant of 20th-century East Coast urban redevelopment. From the 1950s through the 1980s, he worked to revive a declining New Haven, became the architect of the “New Boston,” led New York State’s Urban Development Corporation, and ended his career working to turn around the South Bronx. Prizewinning historian Lizabeth Cohen analyzes Logue’s complicated legacy in urban renewal as a dramatic story of heart- break and destruction, but also of human idealism and resourcefulness.

 

 

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Special Event Queen Victoria: The Making of an Icon 23 October 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM There will be a reception at 7pm, following the presentation. Polly Putnam, Historic Royal Palaces There is a $25 fee to register. This event is complimentary for MHS Fund Giving Circle donors and Algonquin Club Foundation members. This talk, given by Polly Putnam, Collections Curator for the Historic Royal Palaces, considers the ...

This talk, given by Polly Putnam, Collections Curator for the Historic Royal Palaces, considers the development of Queen Victoria's public image over the course of her 63-year reign. Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and later Empress of India, is only second to Queen Elizabeth II as the longest ruling monarch in British history. Queen Victoria ruled from June 20, 1837 until her death on January 22, 1901. Ms. Putnam’s presentation reveals how Queen Victoria made a virtue of and shared her personal life with the people of Great Britain, which ensured not only her popularity but also an enduring public image.

Giving Circle donors* will be our complimentary guests at this special event. Following the presentation, donors will enjoy a lively reception and receive a special gift. Donate $500 or more now to receive your invitation!

*Giving Circle donors have given $500 or more to the MHS Fund in the past 12 months.

This event is co-sponsored by the Algonquin Club Foundation.

 

More
November 2019
Public Program Girl in Black & White: The Story of Mary Mildred Williams & the Abolition Movement 6 November 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Jessie Morgan-Owens There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Jessie Morgan-Owens tells the little-known story of Mary Mildred Williams—a slave girl who ...

Jessie Morgan-Owens tells the little-known story of Mary Mildred Williams—a slave girl who looked “white” and whose image transformed the abolitionist movement. Mary became the face of American slavery when Sen. Charles Sumner saw in her a monumental political opportunity for the abolitionist cause. Weaving together long-overlooked primary sources, including daguerreotypes found in the MHS collection, this history follows Mary through to her own adulthood, describing a life parallel to the antislavery movement. 

 

 

 

 

More
Public Program The Will of the People: The Revolutionary Birth of America 7 November 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. T.H. Breen, Northwestern University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Over eight years of war, ordinary Americans accomplished something extraordinary. Far from the ...

Over eight years of war, ordinary Americans accomplished something extraordinary. Far from the actions of the Continental Congress and the Continental Army, they took responsibility for the course of the Revolution. In villages, towns, and cities from Georgia to New Hampshire, Americans managed local affairs, negotiated shared sacrifice, and participated in a political system in which each believed they were as good as any other. Presenting hundreds of stories, T. H. Breen captures the powerful sense of equality and responsibility resulting from this process of self-determination.

 

 

 

More
Public Program Housing as History: the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative and Orchard Gardens 13 November 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Karilyn Crockett, Lecturer of Public Policy and Urban Planning, MIT; Tony Hernandez, Director of Operations and Stewardship, Dudley Neighbors, Inc.; Valerie Shelley, President, Orchard Gardens Resident Association Location: Dewitt Center, 122 Dewitt Drive, Boston, MA 02120 By the 1980s the Dudley Square neighborhood of Roxbury was facing significant challenges. Absentee ...

By the 1980s the Dudley Square neighborhood of Roxbury was facing significant challenges. Absentee landlords had allowed property to deteriorate, left units vacant, or had used arson to raze buildings and make insurance claims. Facing what many considered insurmountable obstacles, the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative was formed to create a comprehensive plan for “development without displacement.” The first non-governmental organization in America to be granted eminent domain authority, they began purchasing vacant land, protecting affordable housing and creating a community land trust. Meanwhile, the nearby housing project Orchard Park became notorious for crime and drugs. The Orchard Park Tenants Association lobbied for years for improvements and by the mid-1990s began to see a path forward partnering with the police and using community organizing to reduce crime and linking the redevelopment to the new federal HOPE VI program which was meant to revitalize the worst housing projects in America. HOPE VI was in part modeled on the redevelopment of Columbia Point and encouraged partnerships with private developers and a mixture of incomes among the residents. Through community action and smart development, Orchard Park was redeveloped as Orchard Gardens and became a safe, stable neighborhood.

This program is made possible by the generosity of Mass Humanities and the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University.

More
More events
Special Event Opening Our Doors Celebration 14 October 2019.Monday, 10:00AM - 5:00PM

The MHS will join its neighboring cultural institutions for a day of free history, art, music, and cultural happenings in the Fenway neighborhood. With over 20 different museums, venues, colleges, and organizations participating, there will be something for everyone. View Fenway Connections, an exhibition put together by the MHS and the Fenway Studios, take part in a family-friendly art project that is part of our Remember Abigail celebration, and join us for a historic walking tour of the Fenway neighborhood. 

Click here to register for the 11am walking tour of the Fenway neighborhood.

Click here to register for the 2pm walking tour of the Fenway neighborhood.

 

 

close

Public Program Housing as History: Villa Victoria and the Fenway Community Development Corporation Register registration required at no cost 16 October 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Mario Luis Small, Grafstein Professor of Sociology, Harvard University; Mathew Thall, founding Executive Director, Fenway CDC; Mayra I. Negrón-Roche, COO, Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción Location: Blackstone Community Center, 50 W. Brookline St, Boston, MA 02118.

In the 1960s and 1970s Boston struggled to stem urban flight and a landscape of deteriorating housing stock. Massive redevelopment projects, such as the razing of the West End, sent shockwaves through the city. By the mid-1960s, the South End found itself the focus of redevelopment plans. A group of mostly Puerto Rican residents began to meet and then incorporated as the Emergency Tenants’ Council, which became Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción, Inc. (IBA). In 1969, following a widespread campaign, the IBA won the right to serve as the developer for their neighborhood and; using the architecture of Puerto Rico as inspiration, built Villa Victoria. A few years later and few blocks away, the Fenway neighborhood faced the Fenway Urban Renewal Plan (FURP), which planned to clear sections of the neighborhood. local residents sued the city to block FURP and won the right to have a neighborhood-elected board become part of the decision-making process. Out of these efforts came the Fenway CDC with a mission to develop and maintain affordable housing and advocate on behalf of a vibrant and diverse community.

Please note: This program will be held at Blackstone Community Center, 50 W. Brookline St, Boston, MA 02118.

This program is made possible by the generosity of Mass Humanities and the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University.

close

Public Program Legacies of 1619: Afro-Native Connections Register registration required at no cost 19 October 2019.Saturday, 4:00PM - 5:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 3:30. Christine DeLucia, Williams College; Kendra Field, Tufts University; and moderator Catherine Allgor, MHS

Even before the arrival of enslaved Africans, Native Americans were forced into bondage and transported far from their homes in North America. Even as the Native populations were decimated and displaced, the communities that survived remained a refuge for African Americans. These distinct communities forged familial, social, and cultural bonds with each other over time. This program will explore the complex relationship between African Americans, Native Americans, the institution of slavery, and these groups’ attempts to seek equal rights in American society.

This program is part two of a four program series titled Legacies of 1619. The series is a production of the Massachusetts Historical Society and is co-sponsored by the Museum of African American History and the Roxbury Community College.

  

 

close

Public Program Saving America’s Cities: Ed Logue & the Struggle to Renew Urban America in the Suburban Age Register registration required 21 October 2019.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Lizabeth Cohen, Harvard University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Edward J. Logue was a giant of 20th-century East Coast urban redevelopment. From the 1950s through the 1980s, he worked to revive a declining New Haven, became the architect of the “New Boston,” led New York State’s Urban Development Corporation, and ended his career working to turn around the South Bronx. Prizewinning historian Lizabeth Cohen analyzes Logue’s complicated legacy in urban renewal as a dramatic story of heart- break and destruction, but also of human idealism and resourcefulness.

 

 

close

Special Event Queen Victoria: The Making of an Icon Register registration required 23 October 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM There will be a reception at 7pm, following the presentation. Polly Putnam, Historic Royal Palaces There is a $25 fee to register. This event is complimentary for MHS Fund Giving Circle donors and Algonquin Club Foundation members.

This talk, given by Polly Putnam, Collections Curator for the Historic Royal Palaces, considers the development of Queen Victoria's public image over the course of her 63-year reign. Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and later Empress of India, is only second to Queen Elizabeth II as the longest ruling monarch in British history. Queen Victoria ruled from June 20, 1837 until her death on January 22, 1901. Ms. Putnam’s presentation reveals how Queen Victoria made a virtue of and shared her personal life with the people of Great Britain, which ensured not only her popularity but also an enduring public image.

Giving Circle donors* will be our complimentary guests at this special event. Following the presentation, donors will enjoy a lively reception and receive a special gift. Donate $500 or more now to receive your invitation!

*Giving Circle donors have given $500 or more to the MHS Fund in the past 12 months.

This event is co-sponsored by the Algonquin Club Foundation.

 

close

Public Program Girl in Black & White: The Story of Mary Mildred Williams & the Abolition Movement Register registration required 6 November 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Jessie Morgan-Owens There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Jessie Morgan-Owens tells the little-known story of Mary Mildred Williams—a slave girl who looked “white” and whose image transformed the abolitionist movement. Mary became the face of American slavery when Sen. Charles Sumner saw in her a monumental political opportunity for the abolitionist cause. Weaving together long-overlooked primary sources, including daguerreotypes found in the MHS collection, this history follows Mary through to her own adulthood, describing a life parallel to the antislavery movement. 

 

 

 

 

close

Public Program The Will of the People: The Revolutionary Birth of America Register registration required 7 November 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. T.H. Breen, Northwestern University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Over eight years of war, ordinary Americans accomplished something extraordinary. Far from the actions of the Continental Congress and the Continental Army, they took responsibility for the course of the Revolution. In villages, towns, and cities from Georgia to New Hampshire, Americans managed local affairs, negotiated shared sacrifice, and participated in a political system in which each believed they were as good as any other. Presenting hundreds of stories, T. H. Breen captures the powerful sense of equality and responsibility resulting from this process of self-determination.

 

 

 

close

Public Program Housing as History: the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative and Orchard Gardens Register registration required at no cost 13 November 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Karilyn Crockett, Lecturer of Public Policy and Urban Planning, MIT; Tony Hernandez, Director of Operations and Stewardship, Dudley Neighbors, Inc.; Valerie Shelley, President, Orchard Gardens Resident Association Location: Dewitt Center, 122 Dewitt Drive, Boston, MA 02120

By the 1980s the Dudley Square neighborhood of Roxbury was facing significant challenges. Absentee landlords had allowed property to deteriorate, left units vacant, or had used arson to raze buildings and make insurance claims. Facing what many considered insurmountable obstacles, the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative was formed to create a comprehensive plan for “development without displacement.” The first non-governmental organization in America to be granted eminent domain authority, they began purchasing vacant land, protecting affordable housing and creating a community land trust. Meanwhile, the nearby housing project Orchard Park became notorious for crime and drugs. The Orchard Park Tenants Association lobbied for years for improvements and by the mid-1990s began to see a path forward partnering with the police and using community organizing to reduce crime and linking the redevelopment to the new federal HOPE VI program which was meant to revitalize the worst housing projects in America. HOPE VI was in part modeled on the redevelopment of Columbia Point and encouraged partnerships with private developers and a mixture of incomes among the residents. Through community action and smart development, Orchard Park was redeveloped as Orchard Gardens and became a safe, stable neighborhood.

This program is made possible by the generosity of Mass Humanities and the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University.

close


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  • MHS Tours
  • Seminars
  • Public Programs
  • Brown Bags
  • Special Events