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September 2019
Public Program Legacies of 1619: Recognition & Resilience 7 September 2019.Saturday, 4:00PM - 5:00PM REGISTRATION IS CLOSED FOR THIS PROGRAM Kerri Greenidge, Tufts University; David Krugler, University of Wisconsin—Platteville; and Peter Wirzbicki, Princeton University; and moderator Robert Bellinger, Suffolk University Location: Museum of African American History, 46 Joy Street, Boston The institution of slavery in English North America began in 1619 with the arrival of roughly 20 ...

The institution of slavery in English North America began in 1619 with the arrival of roughly 20 Africans in the settlement of Jamestown. What has followed has been 400 years of exploitation and discrimination in many different forms. However, telling this story is not complete without an exploration of how African American communities have created culture and institutions that have survived despite these challenges. This program will explore both structures of exploitation and forms of resistance.

Please note: This program will held at the Museum of African American History, 46 Joy Street, Boston.

This program is part one of a four program series titled Legacies of 1619. The series is co-sponsored by the Museum of African American History and the Roxbury Community College.

   

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Public Program Properties of Empire: Indians, Colonists, & Land Speculators on the New England Frontier 10 September 2019.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Ian Saxine There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Properties of Empire challenges assumptions about the relationship between Indigenous and ...

Properties of Empire challenges assumptions about the relationship between Indigenous and imperial property creation in early America. Many colonists came to believe their prosperity depended on acknowledging Indigenous land rights and Wabanaki Indians’ unity allowed them to forcefully project their own interpretations of poorly remembered land deeds and treaties. The ongoing struggle to construct a commonly agreed-upon culture of landownership shaped diplomacy, imperial administration, and matters of colonial law in powerful ways, and its legacy remains with us today.

 

 

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Public Program Benjamin Franklin’s Influence on Jewish Thought & Practice 12 September 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Shai Afsai There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). In his 20s, Benjamin Franklin resolved to perfect his character, devising a self-improvement method ...

In his 20s, Benjamin Franklin resolved to perfect his character, devising a self-improvement method to aid him in the challenging task of becoming virtuous and intending to complete a book on its use. This method was eventually incorporated into the Jewish ethical tradition through the publication, in 1808, of Rabbi Mendel Lefin’s Book of Spiritual Accounting, which made it available to Hebrew-reading audiences. Shai Afsai discusses this surprising historical development, which has often confused Judaic scholars, and of which Franklin specialists have been largely oblivious.

 

 

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Public Program Legacies of 1619: Recognition & Resilience 7 September 2019.Saturday, 4:00PM - 5:00PM REGISTRATION IS CLOSED FOR THIS PROGRAM Kerri Greenidge, Tufts University; David Krugler, University of Wisconsin—Platteville; and Peter Wirzbicki, Princeton University; and moderator Robert Bellinger, Suffolk University Location: Museum of African American History, 46 Joy Street, Boston

The institution of slavery in English North America began in 1619 with the arrival of roughly 20 Africans in the settlement of Jamestown. What has followed has been 400 years of exploitation and discrimination in many different forms. However, telling this story is not complete without an exploration of how African American communities have created culture and institutions that have survived despite these challenges. This program will explore both structures of exploitation and forms of resistance.

Please note: This program will held at the Museum of African American History, 46 Joy Street, Boston.

This program is part one of a four program series titled Legacies of 1619. The series is co-sponsored by the Museum of African American History and the Roxbury Community College.

   

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Public Program Properties of Empire: Indians, Colonists, & Land Speculators on the New England Frontier 10 September 2019.Tuesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Ian Saxine There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Properties of Empire challenges assumptions about the relationship between Indigenous and imperial property creation in early America. Many colonists came to believe their prosperity depended on acknowledging Indigenous land rights and Wabanaki Indians’ unity allowed them to forcefully project their own interpretations of poorly remembered land deeds and treaties. The ongoing struggle to construct a commonly agreed-upon culture of landownership shaped diplomacy, imperial administration, and matters of colonial law in powerful ways, and its legacy remains with us today.

 

 

close

Public Program Benjamin Franklin’s Influence on Jewish Thought & Practice 12 September 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Shai Afsai There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

In his 20s, Benjamin Franklin resolved to perfect his character, devising a self-improvement method to aid him in the challenging task of becoming virtuous and intending to complete a book on its use. This method was eventually incorporated into the Jewish ethical tradition through the publication, in 1808, of Rabbi Mendel Lefin’s Book of Spiritual Accounting, which made it available to Hebrew-reading audiences. Shai Afsai discusses this surprising historical development, which has often confused Judaic scholars, and of which Franklin specialists have been largely oblivious.

 

 

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