The MHS offers many engaging programs and special events.

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February 2019
Public Program Lincoln & the Jews: A History 11 February 2019.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Jonathan D. Sarna, Brandeis University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Historian Jonathan D. Sarna reveals how Lincoln’s remarkable relationship with American Jews ...

Historian Jonathan D. Sarna reveals how Lincoln’s remarkable relationship with American Jews impacted both his path to the presidency and his policy decisions as president. Expressing a uniquely deep knowledge of the Old Testament, employing its language and concepts in some of his most important writings, Lincoln also befriended Jews from a young age, promoted Jewish equality, and appointed numerous Jews to public office.

 

 

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Public Program Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize Ceremony 13 February 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Douglas L. Winiarski and Stephen Marini Registration is required at no cost. Please join us for a special evening in which Douglas L. Winiarski will receive the 2018 Gomes Prize ...

Please join us for a special evening in which Douglas L. Winiarski will receive the 2018 Gomes Prize for Darkness Falls on the Land of Light: Experiencing Religious Awakenings in 18th-Century New England. Winiarski will join historian Stephen Marini in a conversation about religious revivalism and the shaping influence of religious awakenings on faith and culture in eighteenth-century New England.

 

 

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Public Program Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson & America’s Journey from Slavery to Segregation 18 February 2019.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Steve Luxenberg, Washington Post Associate Editor There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Steve Luxenberg presents a myth-shattering narrative of how a nation embraced &ldquo ...

Steve Luxenberg presents a myth-shattering narrative of how a nation embraced “separation” and its pernicious consequences. Plessy v. Ferguson, the Supreme Court case synonymous with “separate but equal,” created remarkably little stir when the justices announced their near-unanimous decision on May 18, 1896. Yet it is one of the most compelling and dramatic stories of the nineteenth century, whose outcome embraced and protected segregation, and whose reverberations are still felt into the twenty-first.

 

 

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Public Program Uncivil Society 21 February 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Julian E. Zelizer, Princeton University; Michael Tomasky, Democracy; and Robin Young, WBUR and NPR There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). American political discourse has become so dysfunctional it is hard to imagine reaching a national ...

American political discourse has become so dysfunctional it is hard to imagine reaching a national consensus on almost anything. Longstanding historical fault lines over income inequality, racial division, gender roles, and sexual norms coupled with starkly different senses of economic opportunity in rural and urban America have fueled a polarized political landscape. Julian E. Zelizer, Fault Lines: A History of the United States Since 1974, and Michael Tomasky, If We Can Keep It: How the Republic Collapsed and How it Might Be Saved, and Robin Young, co-host of Here & Now on WBUR and NPR, will discuss how we got here and if there is a way back.

 

 

 

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Public Program Begin at the Beginning: “A water to comfort ye hearte”: 17th century medical recipes 23 February 2019.Saturday, 1:00PM - 3:00PM THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT In the 1600s, housewives were called upon to be healers. ...

THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT

In the 1600s, housewives were called upon to be healers. They had a wealth of recipes available to them for a variety of ailments. In this reading discussion group, we will utilize recipes from both manuscript and print collections to delve into the world of lay medicine in the 1600s.

This is a discussion group co-hosted by the Massachusetts Historical Society and the Partnership of Historic Bostons. To learn more visit: http://www.historicbostons.org/ 

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Public Program You Are What You Wear? Navigating Fashion & Politics in New England, 1760s–1770s 27 February 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception 5:30. Kimberly Alexander, University of New Hampshire There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Our guest curator will explore the social values placed on luxury and thrift in New England in the ...

Our guest curator will explore the social values placed on luxury and thrift in New England in the late 18th century. What messages were telegraphed by a person’s clothing and how were these understood? Did everyone in society read these messages the same way or were there statements only meant to be understood by a select few?

 

 

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Public Program The Great Molasses Flood Revisited: Labor and the Molasses Flood 28 February 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-program reception at 5:30. Stephen Puleo; Robert Forrant, UMass Lowell; Carlos Aramayo, and moderator Karilyn Crockett Please note: This program will be held at Old South Meeting House. After the collapse of an industrial tank of molasses left a North End neighborhood devastated, a ...

After the collapse of an industrial tank of molasses left a North End neighborhood devastated, a legal battle for reparations ensued, prompting questions about the role and responsibilities of businesses within a community. Using the Molasses Flood as an historical backdrop, this panel will explore questions around labor rights and safety, the function of government regulations and the relationship between the public and big business interests; issues that still resonate today as modern Bostonians grapple with a changing corporate landscape and city-wide gentrification.

This program is a collaboration between the MHS and Old South Meeting House. It will be held at Old South Meeting House at 310 Washington Street, Boston, MA 02108.

This program is made possible with funding from the Lowell Institute.

 

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Public Program Lincoln & the Jews: A History 11 February 2019.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Jonathan D. Sarna, Brandeis University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Historian Jonathan D. Sarna reveals how Lincoln’s remarkable relationship with American Jews impacted both his path to the presidency and his policy decisions as president. Expressing a uniquely deep knowledge of the Old Testament, employing its language and concepts in some of his most important writings, Lincoln also befriended Jews from a young age, promoted Jewish equality, and appointed numerous Jews to public office.

 

 

close

Public Program Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize Ceremony 13 February 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Douglas L. Winiarski and Stephen Marini Registration is required at no cost.

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

Please join us for a special evening in which Douglas L. Winiarski will receive the 2018 Gomes Prize for Darkness Falls on the Land of Light: Experiencing Religious Awakenings in 18th-Century New England. Winiarski will join historian Stephen Marini in a conversation about religious revivalism and the shaping influence of religious awakenings on faith and culture in eighteenth-century New England.

 

 

close

Public Program Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson & America’s Journey from Slavery to Segregation 18 February 2019.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Steve Luxenberg, Washington Post Associate Editor There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Steve Luxenberg presents a myth-shattering narrative of how a nation embraced “separation” and its pernicious consequences. Plessy v. Ferguson, the Supreme Court case synonymous with “separate but equal,” created remarkably little stir when the justices announced their near-unanimous decision on May 18, 1896. Yet it is one of the most compelling and dramatic stories of the nineteenth century, whose outcome embraced and protected segregation, and whose reverberations are still felt into the twenty-first.

 

 

close

Public Program Uncivil Society 21 February 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Julian E. Zelizer, Princeton University; Michael Tomasky, Democracy; and Robin Young, WBUR and NPR There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

American political discourse has become so dysfunctional it is hard to imagine reaching a national consensus on almost anything. Longstanding historical fault lines over income inequality, racial division, gender roles, and sexual norms coupled with starkly different senses of economic opportunity in rural and urban America have fueled a polarized political landscape. Julian E. Zelizer, Fault Lines: A History of the United States Since 1974, and Michael Tomasky, If We Can Keep It: How the Republic Collapsed and How it Might Be Saved, and Robin Young, co-host of Here & Now on WBUR and NPR, will discuss how we got here and if there is a way back.

 

 

 

close

Public Program Begin at the Beginning: “A water to comfort ye hearte”: 17th century medical recipes 23 February 2019.Saturday, 1:00PM - 3:00PM

THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT

In the 1600s, housewives were called upon to be healers. They had a wealth of recipes available to them for a variety of ailments. In this reading discussion group, we will utilize recipes from both manuscript and print collections to delve into the world of lay medicine in the 1600s.

This is a discussion group co-hosted by the Massachusetts Historical Society and the Partnership of Historic Bostons. To learn more visit: http://www.historicbostons.org/ 

close

Public Program You Are What You Wear? Navigating Fashion & Politics in New England, 1760s–1770s 27 February 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception 5:30. Kimberly Alexander, University of New Hampshire There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Our guest curator will explore the social values placed on luxury and thrift in New England in the late 18th century. What messages were telegraphed by a person’s clothing and how were these understood? Did everyone in society read these messages the same way or were there statements only meant to be understood by a select few?

 

 

close

Public Program The Great Molasses Flood Revisited: Labor and the Molasses Flood 28 February 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-program reception at 5:30. Stephen Puleo; Robert Forrant, UMass Lowell; Carlos Aramayo, and moderator Karilyn Crockett Please note: This program will be held at Old South Meeting House.

After the collapse of an industrial tank of molasses left a North End neighborhood devastated, a legal battle for reparations ensued, prompting questions about the role and responsibilities of businesses within a community. Using the Molasses Flood as an historical backdrop, this panel will explore questions around labor rights and safety, the function of government regulations and the relationship between the public and big business interests; issues that still resonate today as modern Bostonians grapple with a changing corporate landscape and city-wide gentrification.

This program is a collaboration between the MHS and Old South Meeting House. It will be held at Old South Meeting House at 310 Washington Street, Boston, MA 02108.

This program is made possible with funding from the Lowell Institute.

 

close


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