The MHS offers many engaging programs and special events.

December

Back to today
Public Program Robert Treat Paine’s Life & Influence on Law 11 December 2018.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM THIS EVENT IS NOW SOLD OUT. Maura Healey, Massachusetts Attorney General; Alan Rogers, Boston College; Christina Carrick, Assistant Editor, The Papers of Robert Treat Paine Join us for a special event with the current Attorney General looking at the first Massachusetts ...

Join us for a special event with the current Attorney General looking at the first Massachusetts Attorney General’s life and influence on law and order during the Revolutionary era. This event celebrates the completion of the five-volume series The Papers of Robert Treat Paine.

More
Public Program No More, America 12 December 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-program reception at 5:30. Peter Galison, Harvard University; Henry Louis Gates Jr., Harvard University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). In 1773, two graduating Harvard seniors, Theodore Parsons and Eliphalet Pearson, were summoned ...

In 1773, two graduating Harvard seniors, Theodore Parsons and Eliphalet Pearson, were summoned before a public audience to debate whether slavery was compatible with “natural law.” Peter Galison’s short film, “No More, America” co-directed with Henry Louis Gates, reimagines this original debate to include the powerful voice of Phillis Wheatley, an acclaimed poet, then-enslaved, who lived just across the Charles River from the two Harvard students. Join us for a film screening followed by a discussion between Peter Galison, and Henry Louis Gates.

 

 

More
January
Public Program American Eden: David Hosack, Botany, & Medicine in the Garden of the Early Republic 9 January 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Victoria Johnson, Hunter College There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). The legacy of the long-forgotten early American visionary Dr. David Hosack includes the ...

The legacy of the long-forgotten early American visionary Dr. David Hosack includes the establishment of the first botanical garden in the United States as well as groundbreaking advances in pharmaceutical and surgical medicine. His tireless work championing public health and science earned him national fame and praise from the likes of Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Alexander von Humboldt, and the Marquis de Lafayette. Alongside other towering figures of the post-Revolutionary generation, he took the reins of a nation.

More
Public Program Breaking the Banks: Representations & Realities in New England Fisheries, 1866–1966 16 January 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Matthew McKenzie, University of Connecticut There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Matthew McKenzie weaves together the industrial, cultural, political, and ecological history of New ...

Matthew McKenzie weaves together the industrial, cultural, political, and ecological history of New England’s fisheries through the story of how the Boston haddock fleet rose, flourished, and then fished itself into near oblivion before the arrival of foreign competition in 1961. This fleet also embodied the industry’s change during this period, as it shucked its sail-and-oar, hook-and-line origins to embrace mechanized power and propulsion,more sophisticated business practices, and political engagement.

More
Public Program The Great Molasses Flood Revisited: Misremembered Molasses 31 January 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-program reception at 5:30. Stephen Puleo; Allison Lange, Wentworth Institute of Technology; Gavin Kleespies, MHS; and moderator Rev. Stephen T. Ayres Please note: This program will be held at Old South Meeting House. The Great Molasses Flood of 1919, when remembered, is often interpreted in a dismissive, comical ...

The Great Molasses Flood of 1919, when remembered, is often interpreted in a dismissive, comical manner. How does this case compare with other incidences of historical events that are interpreted or "curated" at the expense of accuracy and respect for human experience? How can we bring complexity back to events that have long been relegated to the realm of local folklore? Local scholars will discuss the question of misunderstood history by looking at the Great Molasses Flood, the fight for women's suffrage and Leif Erickson.

This program is a collaboration between the MHS and Old South Meeting House. It will be held at Old South Meeting House at 310 Washington Street, Boston, MA 02108.

This program is made possible with funding from the Lowell Institute.

More
More events
Public Program Robert Treat Paine’s Life & Influence on Law 11 December 2018.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM THIS EVENT IS NOW SOLD OUT. Maura Healey, Massachusetts Attorney General; Alan Rogers, Boston College; Christina Carrick, Assistant Editor, The Papers of Robert Treat Paine

Join us for a special event with the current Attorney General looking at the first Massachusetts Attorney General’s life and influence on law and order during the Revolutionary era. This event celebrates the completion of the five-volume series The Papers of Robert Treat Paine.

close
Public Program No More, America 12 December 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-program reception at 5:30. Peter Galison, Harvard University; Henry Louis Gates Jr., Harvard University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

In 1773, two graduating Harvard seniors, Theodore Parsons and Eliphalet Pearson, were summoned before a public audience to debate whether slavery was compatible with “natural law.” Peter Galison’s short film, “No More, America” co-directed with Henry Louis Gates, reimagines this original debate to include the powerful voice of Phillis Wheatley, an acclaimed poet, then-enslaved, who lived just across the Charles River from the two Harvard students. Join us for a film screening followed by a discussion between Peter Galison, and Henry Louis Gates.

 

 

close
Public Program American Eden: David Hosack, Botany, & Medicine in the Garden of the Early Republic registration required 9 January 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Victoria Johnson, Hunter College There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

The legacy of the long-forgotten early American visionary Dr. David Hosack includes the establishment of the first botanical garden in the United States as well as groundbreaking advances in pharmaceutical and surgical medicine. His tireless work championing public health and science earned him national fame and praise from the likes of Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Alexander von Humboldt, and the Marquis de Lafayette. Alongside other towering figures of the post-Revolutionary generation, he took the reins of a nation.

close
Public Program Breaking the Banks: Representations & Realities in New England Fisheries, 1866–1966 registration required 16 January 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Matthew McKenzie, University of Connecticut There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Matthew McKenzie weaves together the industrial, cultural, political, and ecological history of New England’s fisheries through the story of how the Boston haddock fleet rose, flourished, and then fished itself into near oblivion before the arrival of foreign competition in 1961. This fleet also embodied the industry’s change during this period, as it shucked its sail-and-oar, hook-and-line origins to embrace mechanized power and propulsion,more sophisticated business practices, and political engagement.

close
Public Program The Great Molasses Flood Revisited: Misremembered Molasses registration required at no cost 31 January 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-program reception at 5:30. Stephen Puleo; Allison Lange, Wentworth Institute of Technology; Gavin Kleespies, MHS; and moderator Rev. Stephen T. Ayres Please note: This program will be held at Old South Meeting House.

The Great Molasses Flood of 1919, when remembered, is often interpreted in a dismissive, comical manner. How does this case compare with other incidences of historical events that are interpreted or "curated" at the expense of accuracy and respect for human experience? How can we bring complexity back to events that have long been relegated to the realm of local folklore? Local scholars will discuss the question of misunderstood history by looking at the Great Molasses Flood, the fight for women's suffrage and Leif Erickson.

This program is a collaboration between the MHS and Old South Meeting House. It will be held at Old South Meeting House at 310 Washington Street, Boston, MA 02108.

This program is made possible with funding from the Lowell Institute.

close

    Key to event colors:
  • MHS Tours
  • Seminars
  • Public Programs
  • Brown Bags
  • Special Events