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                  • Public Program, Online Event, Conversation"At Noon on the 20th Day of January": Contested Elections in Americ...
                    Public Program, Online Event, Conversation"At Noon on the 20th Day of January": Contested Elections in American History
                    3:00PM - 4:30PM This is an online program Joanne B. Freeman, Yale University; Peter S. Onuf, University of Virginia; Rachel A. Shelden, Penn State University; Erik B. Alexander, Southern Illinois University; moderated by Ted Widmer More
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                    • Environmental History Seminar, Online Event, SeminarWater Over the Dam: The Destruction of Colonial New England's River...
                      Environmental History Seminar, Online Event, SeminarWater Over the Dam: The Destruction of Colonial New England's River Fisheries
                      5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Zachary Bennett, Norwich University Matthew McKenzie, University of Connecticut More
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                              • Online Event, Seminar, History of Women, Gender and Sexuality SeminarHigh Brow, Low Brow: Phrenology, Fashion, and Female Activism in th...
                                Online Event, Seminar, History of Women, Gender and Sexuality SeminarHigh Brow, Low Brow: Phrenology, Fashion, and Female Activism in the Nineteenth Century
                                5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Rachel Walker, University of Hartford Sari Altschuler, Northeastern University More
                                • Seminar, African American History Seminar, Online EventRevolutionary Weddings: Marriage in the Black Panther Party
                                  Seminar, African American History Seminar, Online EventRevolutionary Weddings: Marriage in the Black Panther Party
                                  5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Traci Parker, University of Massachusetts - Amherst Robyn Spencer, CUNY - Lehman College Register registration required at no cost More
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                                        • Seminar, Digital History Seminar, Online EventExcavating Egyptology: The Emma B. Andrews Diary Project
                                          Seminar, Digital History Seminar, Online EventExcavating Egyptology: The Emma B. Andrews Diary Project
                                          5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Sarah Ketchley, University of Washington Jennifer Stertzer, University of Virginia Register registration required at no cost More
                                          • Public Program, Online Event, Author TalkThe Province of Affliction: Illness and the Making of Early New Eng...
                                            Public Program, Online Event, Author TalkThe Province of Affliction: Illness and the Making of Early New England
                                            5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Ben Mutschler, Oregon State University, in conversation with Liz Covart, Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture Register registration required at no cost More
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                                                Exhibition Who Counts: A Look at Voter Rights through Political Cartoons 15 September 2020 to 30 April 2021 This is a virtual exhibition. Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/exhibitions/WhoCounts_calendar-listing-graphic.jpg

                                                Political cartoons have long served to provoke public debate, illustrating opinions of the day for the masses. From early in the 19th century, arguments over voting rights—who votes and who counts the votes—have been depicted in cartoons, especially with the rise of illustrated newspapers and magazines with a national circulation before the Civil War. 

                                                Featuring examples of published cartoons from the MHS collections as well as other libraries and foundations, this exhibition illustrates how cartoonists helped to tell the story of voting rights in the United States. In addition to many drawings by Thomas Nast, the most influential American political cartoonist in the decades following the Civil War, this exhibition features modern reinterpretations of these topics by editorial cartoonists, including Herblock (Herbert Block), Tom Toles, Bill Mauldin, and the work of current Boston-area artists.

                                                Explore the online exhibition at www.masshist.org/whocounts.

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                                                Exhibition Thomas Nast: A Life in Cartoons 30 September 2020 to 30 April 2021 This is a virtual exhibition. Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/exhibitions/ThomasNast_calendar-listing-graphic.jpg

                                                Thomas Nast defined American political cartoons in the decades following the Civil War. His illustrations popularized icons such as the Republican elephant, the Democratic donkey, and even the modern image of Santa Claus. This exhibition highlights Thomas Nast’s remarkable impact through a cartoon biography created by local artists.

                                                Explore the online exhibition at www.masshist.org/thomasnast.

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                                                Public Program, Online Event, Conversation "At Noon on the 20th Day of January": Contested Elections in American History 9 January 2021.Saturday, 3:00PM - 4:30PM This is an online program Joanne B. Freeman, Yale University; Peter S. Onuf, University of Virginia; Rachel A. Shelden, Penn State University; Erik B. Alexander, Southern Illinois University; moderated by Ted Widmer Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/thumbnail_3538_Congressional-pugilists-for-e-blast.jpg

                                                Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

                                                The 2020 Presidential Election took place in a profoundly polarized nation with a fractious and unpredictable incumbent, leading to anxieties that there might not be a peaceful transfer of power. But this has happened before in the republic's history. This panel of esteemed scholars will place this historic moment in context. At what other points has the peaceful transition of presidential power been uncertain? What role does the Constitution play in establishing the tradition of presidential transition? And if bitterness and rancor is sometimes to be expected during presidential elections, at what point does it threaten democracy and influence the course of the nation?

                                                The image above is “Congressional Pugilists”, a political cartoon depicting Matthew Lyon fighting with a federalist opponent on the floor of Congress early in 1798.

                                                 

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                                                Public Program, Author Talk, Online Event Rescued from Oblivion: Historical Cultures in the Early United States 11 January 2021.Monday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Alea Henle in conversation with Peter Drummey, MHS Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2021/Rescued_from_Oblivion.jpg

                                                Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

                                                In 1791, a group of elite Bostonian men established the first historical society in the nation. With in-depth research and an expansive scope, Alea Henle offers a vital account of the formation of historical culture and consciousness in the early United States, re-centering in the record groups long marginalized from the national memory. These societies laid the groundwork for professional practices that are still embraced today: collection policies, distinctions between preservation of textual and nontextual artifacts, publication programs, historical rituals and commemorations, and more. At the same time, officers of these early societies faced challenges to their historical authority from communities interested in preserving a broader range of materials and documenting more inclusive histories, including fellow members, popular historians, white women, and peoples of color.

                                                 

                                                 

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                                                Environmental History Seminar, Online Event, Seminar Water Over the Dam: The Destruction of Colonial New England's River Fisheries 12 January 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Zachary Bennett, Norwich University Matthew McKenzie, University of Connecticut Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EHS_banner.jpg

                                                River restoration projects across North America are dismantling dams to restore the legendary fish runs of the past. People incorrectly point to the industrial revolution as the culprit. This paper will show that fish disappeared from most of southern New England’s rivers one hundred years before that. The destruction of New England’s fish runs triggered a cascade of economic and environmental changes that shaped legal and political culture during the Revolution and early republic.

                                                The Environmental History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

                                                Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

                                                 

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                                                Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk Settling the Good Land - Governance and Promotion in John Winthrop’s New England 1620-1650 14 January 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Agnès Delahaye, University of Lyon Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/2020_programs/6861_jwinthrop_work_lg-1.jpg

                                                Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

                                                Settling the Good Land is the first institutional history of the Massachusetts Bay Company, a cornerstone of early modern English colonization in North America. Agnès Delahaye analyzes the settlement as a form of colonial innovation, to reveal the political significance of early New England sources, above and beyond religion. John Winthrop was not just a Puritan, but a settler governor who wrote the history of the expansion of his company as a record of successful and enduring policy. Delahaye argues that settlement, as the action and the experience of appropriating the land, is key to understanding the role played by Winthrop’s writings in American historiography, before independence and in our times.

                                                 

                                                 

                                                 

                                                 

                                                 

                                                 

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                                                Online Event, Seminar, History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar High Brow, Low Brow: Phrenology, Fashion, and Female Activism in the Nineteenth Century 19 January 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Rachel Walker, University of Hartford Sari Altschuler, Northeastern University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/WGS_Banner.jpg

                                                Between the 1830s and 1860s, Americans began fighting over a curious topic: female foreheads. While feminists and phrenologists saw “high brows” as an alluring sign of intelligence in women, gender conservatives viewed them as a troubling assault on patriarchal hierarchies. At first glance, the public battles over female foreheads might seem like frivolous exchanges over women’s appearances. In reality, they were not just political conflicts but also scientific debates about the capacities of the female brain.

                                                The History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

                                                Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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                                                Seminar, African American History Seminar, Online Event Revolutionary Weddings: Marriage in the Black Panther Party Register registration required at no cost 21 January 2021.Thursday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Traci Parker, University of Massachusetts - Amherst Robyn Spencer, CUNY - Lehman College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/AAH_banner_immage.jpg

                                                Revolutionary love and marriages in the Black Panther Party were powerful aspects of Black Power politics. This paper argues that Panthers viewed Black romantic love as an act and a tool of revolution. They believed that, if African Americans embraced love and marriage, defining it and its parameters in ways that best suited individuals and race, they could reclaim, reimagine, and build strong Black families and communities, destabilize white supremacy, and realize Black liberation.

                                                The African American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

                                                Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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                                                Seminar, Digital History Seminar, Online Event Excavating Egyptology: The Emma B. Andrews Diary Project Register registration required at no cost 26 January 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program. Sarah Ketchley, University of Washington Jennifer Stertzer, University of Virginia Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/Banner.jpg

                                                The Nile travel diaries of Mrs. Emma B. Andrews are an important yet underutilized resource for the so-called “Golden Age” of Egyptian archaeology in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This paper will discuss the evolution of the Emma B. Andrews Diary Project (est. 2011), and the project’s processes for transcription, encoding, analysis and presentation in a digital format.

                                                The Digital History Projects Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

                                                Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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                                                Public Program, Online Event, Author Talk The Province of Affliction: Illness and the Making of Early New England Register registration required at no cost 28 January 2021.Thursday, 5:30PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Ben Mutschler, Oregon State University, in conversation with Liz Covart, Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/winter_2021/province_of_affliction.jpg

                                                Afflictions of all sorts coursed through eighteenth-century New England – towns and cities set ablaze by epidemics, soldiers sickened and injured in the fight for empire, families and households laboring under an astonishing range of sufferings that were at once common and costly. This session will bring Ben Mutschler, author of The Province of Affliction: Illness and the Making of Early New England (Chicago, 2020), together with Liz Covart, podcast host of Ben Franklin’s World, to discuss how the early modern world addressed issues at once strange and familiar to us all.

                                                Get 20% off the list price when you order Province of Affliction through UChicago Press using code BEN20 at checkout. 

                                                 

                                                 

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