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May 2019
Brown Bag Shinbone and Beefsteak: Meat, Science, and the Labor Question 1 May 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Molly S. Laas, University of Göttingen Medical School Could better nutrition help shore up U.S. democracy in an era of mass inequality? This talk explores ...

Could better nutrition help shore up U.S. democracy in an era of mass inequality? This talk explores the early years of nutrition science in the late nineteenth century by examining the science’s use as a tool for cultural and political change. By looking at how scientists understood the relationship between wages, the cost of living, and better nutrition, my paper will shed light on the political life of scientific ideas.

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Brown Bag Odor and Power in the Americas: Olfactory Racism and the Atlantic World 8 May 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Andrew Kettler, University of Toronto This talk shows that capitalism incentivized discourses of African pungency applied by intellectuals ...

This talk shows that capitalism incentivized discourses of African pungency applied by intellectuals throughout the Atlantic World to justify racial dominance. Born of English literature, and agitated during the late Enlightenment, the idea that African bodies smelled perpetuates into modernity as a discourse of embodied racism.

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Brown Bag Shinbone and Beefsteak: Meat, Science, and the Labor Question this event is free 1 May 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Molly S. Laas, University of Göttingen Medical School

Could better nutrition help shore up U.S. democracy in an era of mass inequality? This talk explores the early years of nutrition science in the late nineteenth century by examining the science’s use as a tool for cultural and political change. By looking at how scientists understood the relationship between wages, the cost of living, and better nutrition, my paper will shed light on the political life of scientific ideas.

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Brown Bag Odor and Power in the Americas: Olfactory Racism and the Atlantic World this event is free 8 May 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Andrew Kettler, University of Toronto

This talk shows that capitalism incentivized discourses of African pungency applied by intellectuals throughout the Atlantic World to justify racial dominance. Born of English literature, and agitated during the late Enlightenment, the idea that African bodies smelled perpetuates into modernity as a discourse of embodied racism.

close


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