August

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Brown Bag Re-categorizing Americans: Difference, Distinction, and Belonging in the Dillingham Commission (1907-1911) 22 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Sunmin Kim, Dartmouth College This talk traces how the federal government surveyed immigrants in the early-20th century and how ...

This talk traces how the federal government surveyed immigrants in the early-20th century and how such attempts helped solidify the racial boundary-making for the nation. By dissecting the tenuous connections between racist ideology, state power, and social science knowledge, this talk provides an empirical account of how categories such as race and ethnicity emerge from confusion and contradiction in knowledge production.

More
Brown Bag "A Brazen Wall to Keep the Scriptures Certainty": European Biblical Scholarship in Early America 24 August 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kirsten Macfarlane, University of Cambridge During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, European scholars made significant advances in the ...

During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, European scholars made significant advances in the historical and critical study of the Bible, often with highly controversial and factious results. This talk will examine how such exciting but potentially subversive European scholarship was received and transformed by its early American readers, through a close study of the books owned and annotated by seventeenth-century readers in New England and elsewhere.

More
Brown Bag The Missionary Republic: American Evangelicals and the Birth of Modern Missions 27 August 2018.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Thomas Whittaker, Harvard University The turn of the nineteenth century was a time of missionary mobilization for evangelicals in Britain ...

The turn of the nineteenth century was a time of missionary mobilization for evangelicals in Britain, the United States, and continental Europe. This talk explains why Americans bought into the missions movement and how they domesticated it within a republican vision of civilization building on the frontier.

More
Brown Bag Masters of the Market: Ship Captaincy in the Colonial British Atlantic 31 August 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Hannah Tucker, University of Virginia During the colonial period, captains acted as powerful auxiliaries for their vessel owners in ...

During the colonial period, captains acted as powerful auxiliaries for their vessel owners in markets far from the owners’ direct oversight. This talk explores why the economic services ship captains provided transformed as the Atlantic trading economy became more complex, capital intensive, and informed in the eighteenth century.

More
September
Brown Bag Garrisonian Rhode Island: Reassessing Abolitionism’s Radicals 5 September 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kevin Vrevich, Ohio State University This talk explores the place of Rhode Island, a center of William Lloyd Garrison’s &ldquo ...

This talk explores the place of Rhode Island, a center of William Lloyd Garrison’s “radical” abolitionism, in the larger antislavery network. As historians of abolitionism increasingly focus on continuities within the movement, Rhode Island offers an opportunity to reassess the place of the Garrisonians and to reconsider their contributions.

More
Brown Bag American Silver, Chinese Silverwares, and the Global Circulation of Value 7 September 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Susan Eberhard, University of California, Berkeley Silver coin was the primary commodity shipped to China from the United States in the late eighteenth ...

Silver coin was the primary commodity shipped to China from the United States in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, some of which was reworked into silverwares by Chinese craftsmen for British and American buyers. This talk explores the different silver conduits of the American trade relationship with China. Far from a neutral medium, how were understandings of its materiality mobilized in cross-cultural transactions?

More
Brown Bag “This Summer-Home of the Survivors”: The Civil War Vacation in Architecture & Landscape, 1878-1910 12 September 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM C. Ian Stevenson, Boston University In the decades after the Civil War, its veterans built communal summer cottages in waterfront ...

In the decades after the Civil War, its veterans built communal summer cottages in waterfront locations to merge memory and leisure among their comrades and families. Through interdisciplinary lenses, this talk considers the ways veterans used architecture and landscape to heal their wartime trauma and preserve their scripted legacy.

More
Brown Bag A Possible Connection between a Scandal and Susanna Rowson's Last Novel 14 September 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Steven Epley, Samford University The talk will describe evidence in letters and public records suggesting that best-selling author ...

The talk will describe evidence in letters and public records suggesting that best-selling author Susanna Rowson may have based her last novel, Lucy Temple, at least in part on a scandal in which she was innocently but indirectly involved in Medford, Mass., in 1799.

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October
Brown Bag Native Citizens: Race, Culture, & the Politics of Belonging, 1884-1924 3 October 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Lila Teeters, University of New Hampshire As the nineteenth century gave way to the twentieth, Native activists played an essential—yet ...

As the nineteenth century gave way to the twentieth, Native activists played an essential—yet overlooked—role in shaping constructions of American citizenship. Some pushed to harden the political boundaries separating Native nations from their American foil, while others sought to remove those boundaries completely. Still others sought a more permeable relationship. This talk traces those debates from the 1884 Elk v. Wilkins decision through the 1924 Indian Citizenship Act.

More
Brown Bag Liverpool, Slavery, and the Atlantic Cotton Frontier c. 1763-1833 5 October 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Alexey Krichtal, Johns Hopkins University This talk follows the enslaved peoples who toiled on cotton estates in the Caribbean, Northeast ...

This talk follows the enslaved peoples who toiled on cotton estates in the Caribbean, Northeast Brazil and the American South, the planters who owned cotton plantations, the mariners who crossed the Atlantic basin shipping the fiber to Europe, and the merchants who linked enslaved producers to the Manchester manufacturers and fashion-orientated consumers in the Americas on a scale never see before, helping to usher in the first Industrial Revolution.

More
Brown Bag Examining Land Ownership in the Praying Towns of New England 15 October 2018.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Taylor Kirsch, University of California, Santa Cruz Across the tumultuous borderlands of 17th-century Southern New England, a diverse indigenous ...

Across the tumultuous borderlands of 17th-century Southern New England, a diverse indigenous population numbering in the thousands carved out space for themselves via an unlikely colonial project, “praying towns.” This talk explores the complexities of indigenous land tenure within these communities, and its role in shaping the cultural, political, and spiritual landscape of New England.

More
Brown Bag “Watering of the Olive Plant”: Catechisms and Catechizing in Early New England 17 October 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Roberto Flores de Apodaca, University of South Carolina Early New Englanders produced and used an unusually large number of catechisms. These catechisms ...

Early New Englanders produced and used an unusually large number of catechisms. These catechisms shaped relations of faith for church membership, provided content for missions to the Indians, and empowered lay persons theologically to critique their ministers. This talk explores the content and the function of these unique, question and answer documents.

More
November
Brown Bag John Perkins Cushing and Boston's Early China Trade 7 November 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Gwenn Miller, College of the Holy Cross In July of 1803, John Perkins Cushing, an orphaned relation of some of the most prominent families ...

In July of 1803, John Perkins Cushing, an orphaned relation of some of the most prominent families in Boston, set sail for the Canton at the age of sixteen. The emerging literature on the Early American China trade often mentions Cushing as an aside, sometimes refers in passing to his importance among the foreign residents of Canton. This project explores how he came to be in that position of importance and casts Boston’s opium exchange at the center of the trade.

More
Brown Bag Persistent Futures of Americas Past: The Genres of Geography and Race in Early America 9 November 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Timothy Fosbury, University of California, Los Angeles This talk analyzes the speculative literary origins of America as a desired community and geography ...

This talk analyzes the speculative literary origins of America as a desired community and geography of economic, political, and religious belonging in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries by considering how place making was a form of nascent race making in the early Americas. Moving between New England, Bermuda, and the Caribbean, this talk considers how settler imaginings of their desired futures in the Americas produced the preconditions for what we would now call race.

More
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Brown Bag Re-categorizing Americans: Difference, Distinction, and Belonging in the Dillingham Commission (1907-1911) 22 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Sunmin Kim, Dartmouth College

This talk traces how the federal government surveyed immigrants in the early-20th century and how such attempts helped solidify the racial boundary-making for the nation. By dissecting the tenuous connections between racist ideology, state power, and social science knowledge, this talk provides an empirical account of how categories such as race and ethnicity emerge from confusion and contradiction in knowledge production.

close
Brown Bag "A Brazen Wall to Keep the Scriptures Certainty": European Biblical Scholarship in Early America 24 August 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kirsten Macfarlane, University of Cambridge

During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, European scholars made significant advances in the historical and critical study of the Bible, often with highly controversial and factious results. This talk will examine how such exciting but potentially subversive European scholarship was received and transformed by its early American readers, through a close study of the books owned and annotated by seventeenth-century readers in New England and elsewhere.

close
Brown Bag The Missionary Republic: American Evangelicals and the Birth of Modern Missions 27 August 2018.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Thomas Whittaker, Harvard University

The turn of the nineteenth century was a time of missionary mobilization for evangelicals in Britain, the United States, and continental Europe. This talk explains why Americans bought into the missions movement and how they domesticated it within a republican vision of civilization building on the frontier.

close
Brown Bag Masters of the Market: Ship Captaincy in the Colonial British Atlantic 31 August 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Hannah Tucker, University of Virginia

During the colonial period, captains acted as powerful auxiliaries for their vessel owners in markets far from the owners’ direct oversight. This talk explores why the economic services ship captains provided transformed as the Atlantic trading economy became more complex, capital intensive, and informed in the eighteenth century.

close
Brown Bag Garrisonian Rhode Island: Reassessing Abolitionism’s Radicals 5 September 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kevin Vrevich, Ohio State University

This talk explores the place of Rhode Island, a center of William Lloyd Garrison’s “radical” abolitionism, in the larger antislavery network. As historians of abolitionism increasingly focus on continuities within the movement, Rhode Island offers an opportunity to reassess the place of the Garrisonians and to reconsider their contributions.

close
Brown Bag American Silver, Chinese Silverwares, and the Global Circulation of Value 7 September 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Susan Eberhard, University of California, Berkeley

Silver coin was the primary commodity shipped to China from the United States in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, some of which was reworked into silverwares by Chinese craftsmen for British and American buyers. This talk explores the different silver conduits of the American trade relationship with China. Far from a neutral medium, how were understandings of its materiality mobilized in cross-cultural transactions?

close
Brown Bag “This Summer-Home of the Survivors”: The Civil War Vacation in Architecture & Landscape, 1878-1910 12 September 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM C. Ian Stevenson, Boston University

In the decades after the Civil War, its veterans built communal summer cottages in waterfront locations to merge memory and leisure among their comrades and families. Through interdisciplinary lenses, this talk considers the ways veterans used architecture and landscape to heal their wartime trauma and preserve their scripted legacy.

close
Brown Bag A Possible Connection between a Scandal and Susanna Rowson's Last Novel 14 September 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Steven Epley, Samford University

The talk will describe evidence in letters and public records suggesting that best-selling author Susanna Rowson may have based her last novel, Lucy Temple, at least in part on a scandal in which she was innocently but indirectly involved in Medford, Mass., in 1799.

close
Brown Bag Native Citizens: Race, Culture, & the Politics of Belonging, 1884-1924 3 October 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Lila Teeters, University of New Hampshire

As the nineteenth century gave way to the twentieth, Native activists played an essential—yet overlooked—role in shaping constructions of American citizenship. Some pushed to harden the political boundaries separating Native nations from their American foil, while others sought to remove those boundaries completely. Still others sought a more permeable relationship. This talk traces those debates from the 1884 Elk v. Wilkins decision through the 1924 Indian Citizenship Act.

close
Brown Bag Liverpool, Slavery, and the Atlantic Cotton Frontier c. 1763-1833 5 October 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Alexey Krichtal, Johns Hopkins University

This talk follows the enslaved peoples who toiled on cotton estates in the Caribbean, Northeast Brazil and the American South, the planters who owned cotton plantations, the mariners who crossed the Atlantic basin shipping the fiber to Europe, and the merchants who linked enslaved producers to the Manchester manufacturers and fashion-orientated consumers in the Americas on a scale never see before, helping to usher in the first Industrial Revolution.

close
Brown Bag Examining Land Ownership in the Praying Towns of New England 15 October 2018.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Taylor Kirsch, University of California, Santa Cruz

Across the tumultuous borderlands of 17th-century Southern New England, a diverse indigenous population numbering in the thousands carved out space for themselves via an unlikely colonial project, “praying towns.” This talk explores the complexities of indigenous land tenure within these communities, and its role in shaping the cultural, political, and spiritual landscape of New England.

close
Brown Bag “Watering of the Olive Plant”: Catechisms and Catechizing in Early New England 17 October 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Roberto Flores de Apodaca, University of South Carolina

Early New Englanders produced and used an unusually large number of catechisms. These catechisms shaped relations of faith for church membership, provided content for missions to the Indians, and empowered lay persons theologically to critique their ministers. This talk explores the content and the function of these unique, question and answer documents.

close
Brown Bag John Perkins Cushing and Boston's Early China Trade this event is free 7 November 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Gwenn Miller, College of the Holy Cross

In July of 1803, John Perkins Cushing, an orphaned relation of some of the most prominent families in Boston, set sail for the Canton at the age of sixteen. The emerging literature on the Early American China trade often mentions Cushing as an aside, sometimes refers in passing to his importance among the foreign residents of Canton. This project explores how he came to be in that position of importance and casts Boston’s opium exchange at the center of the trade.

close
Brown Bag Persistent Futures of Americas Past: The Genres of Geography and Race in Early America this event is free 9 November 2018.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Timothy Fosbury, University of California, Los Angeles

This talk analyzes the speculative literary origins of America as a desired community and geography of economic, political, and religious belonging in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries by considering how place making was a form of nascent race making in the early Americas. Moving between New England, Bermuda, and the Caribbean, this talk considers how settler imaginings of their desired futures in the Americas produced the preconditions for what we would now call race.

close

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