October

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Brown Bag Palatable Slavery: Food, Race, and Freedom in the British Atlantic, 1620-1838 18 October 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Heather Sanford, Brown University This project uses food in the British Atlantic to understand ideas about the body, race, and freedom ...

This project uses food in the British Atlantic to understand ideas about the body, race, and freedom. In New England, the Caribbean, and the Gold Coast of Africa, supplies of foodstuffs sustained colonization and slavery. Food allowed for survival, and also demarcated hierarchies of class, gender, and especially race. However, subjugated populations often used food-related practices to negotiate degrees of freedom within (and in defiance of) oppressive systems of colonization and slavery.

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Brown Bag "Let it be your resolution to be happy": Women's Emotion Work in the Early Republic 23 October 2017.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Laura McCoy, Northwestern University Tasked with maintaining the comfort and happiness of their families even in the face of adversity, ...

Tasked with maintaining the comfort and happiness of their families even in the face of adversity, many middling- and upper-class women in the early-nineteenth century saw expressing and managing emotions as the foundation of their daily labors. This talk explores the everyday realities of this emotion work and helps us understand women’s actions and self-perceptions—as well as wider familial and social dynamics—in the early republic.

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Brown Bag Political Appetites: Revolution, Taste, and Culinary Activism in the Early Republic 25 October 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Nancy Siegel, Towson University Culinary activists furthered republican values in the revolutionary era as part of a political and ...

Culinary activists furthered republican values in the revolutionary era as part of a political and cultural ideology. They developed a culinary vocabulary expressed in words and actions such as the refusal to consume politically charged comestibles, like imported tea, and the celebration of a national horticulture. Through these choices, they established a culinary discourse involving food, political culture, and national identity from the Stamp Act to the early republic.

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November
Brown Bag Equal School Rights: Black Girlhood and School Desegregation in Antebellum Massachusetts 1 November 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kabria Baumgartner, University of New Hampshire Eunice Ross. Phebe Ann Boston. Sarah Roberts. Sarah Parker Remond. Charlotte Forten Grimké. ...

Eunice Ross. Phebe Ann Boston. Sarah Roberts. Sarah Parker Remond. Charlotte Forten Grimké. Joanna Turpin Howard. These six African American women, among others, played an integral role in the fight to desegregate public schools in antebellum Massachusetts. They authored anti-discrimination petitions, they helped to organize boycotts, and they wrote missives against racial prejudice. As this school desegregation campaign grew, so too did an activist network that bound together African American women, men, and children as well as their allies from Salem to Nantucket to Boston.

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Brown Bag Politics at the Poles: Liberty Poles and the Popular Struggle for the New Republic 8 November 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Shira Lurie, University of Virginia This project examines conflicts over liberty poles in the 1790s. Liberty poles offered grassroots ...

This project examines conflicts over liberty poles in the 1790s. Liberty poles offered grassroots partisans a tangible symbol through which to channel debates about political participation, popular sovereignty, and dissent under the new Constitution.

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Brown Bag The Roasting of Hugh Peter: Satire and Politics in Early America 15 November 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Adrian Weimer, Providence College Accused regicide and former pastor of Salem, Massachusetts, Hugh Peter was the target of colorful ...

Accused regicide and former pastor of Salem, Massachusetts, Hugh Peter was the target of colorful satirical ballads and mock-sermons in the mid-seventeenth century. This presentation will explore the ways Royalists attacked Peter as a way of mocking the culture of puritanism, expressing anxieties about the very existence of puritan colonies.

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Brown Bag Palatable Slavery: Food, Race, and Freedom in the British Atlantic, 1620-1838 this event is free 18 October 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Heather Sanford, Brown University

This project uses food in the British Atlantic to understand ideas about the body, race, and freedom. In New England, the Caribbean, and the Gold Coast of Africa, supplies of foodstuffs sustained colonization and slavery. Food allowed for survival, and also demarcated hierarchies of class, gender, and especially race. However, subjugated populations often used food-related practices to negotiate degrees of freedom within (and in defiance of) oppressive systems of colonization and slavery.

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Brown Bag "Let it be your resolution to be happy": Women's Emotion Work in the Early Republic this event is free 23 October 2017.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Laura McCoy, Northwestern University

Tasked with maintaining the comfort and happiness of their families even in the face of adversity, many middling- and upper-class women in the early-nineteenth century saw expressing and managing emotions as the foundation of their daily labors. This talk explores the everyday realities of this emotion work and helps us understand women’s actions and self-perceptions—as well as wider familial and social dynamics—in the early republic.

close
Brown Bag Political Appetites: Revolution, Taste, and Culinary Activism in the Early Republic this event is free 25 October 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Nancy Siegel, Towson University

Culinary activists furthered republican values in the revolutionary era as part of a political and cultural ideology. They developed a culinary vocabulary expressed in words and actions such as the refusal to consume politically charged comestibles, like imported tea, and the celebration of a national horticulture. Through these choices, they established a culinary discourse involving food, political culture, and national identity from the Stamp Act to the early republic.

close
Brown Bag Equal School Rights: Black Girlhood and School Desegregation in Antebellum Massachusetts this event is free 1 November 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kabria Baumgartner, University of New Hampshire

Eunice Ross. Phebe Ann Boston. Sarah Roberts. Sarah Parker Remond. Charlotte Forten Grimké. Joanna Turpin Howard. These six African American women, among others, played an integral role in the fight to desegregate public schools in antebellum Massachusetts. They authored anti-discrimination petitions, they helped to organize boycotts, and they wrote missives against racial prejudice. As this school desegregation campaign grew, so too did an activist network that bound together African American women, men, and children as well as their allies from Salem to Nantucket to Boston.

close
Brown Bag Politics at the Poles: Liberty Poles and the Popular Struggle for the New Republic this event is free 8 November 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Shira Lurie, University of Virginia

This project examines conflicts over liberty poles in the 1790s. Liberty poles offered grassroots partisans a tangible symbol through which to channel debates about political participation, popular sovereignty, and dissent under the new Constitution.

close
Brown Bag The Roasting of Hugh Peter: Satire and Politics in Early America this event is free 15 November 2017.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Adrian Weimer, Providence College

Accused regicide and former pastor of Salem, Massachusetts, Hugh Peter was the target of colorful satirical ballads and mock-sermons in the mid-seventeenth century. This presentation will explore the ways Royalists attacked Peter as a way of mocking the culture of puritanism, expressing anxieties about the very existence of puritan colonies.

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