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February 2019
Public Program, Author Talk Lincoln & the Jews: A History 11 February 2019.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Jonathan D. Sarna, Brandeis University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Historian Jonathan D. Sarna reveals how Lincoln’s remarkable relationship with American Jews ...

Historian Jonathan D. Sarna reveals how Lincoln’s remarkable relationship with American Jews impacted both his path to the presidency and his policy decisions as president. Expressing a uniquely deep knowledge of the Old Testament, employing its language and concepts in some of his most important writings, Lincoln also befriended Jews from a young age, promoted Jewish equality, and appointed numerous Jews to public office.

 

 

More
Building Closed Building Closing at 1:00 PM 12 February 2019.Tuesday, all day Due to forecasted weather conditions the MHS will be closing at 1:00 PM today.

Due to forecasted weather conditions the MHS will be closing at 1:00 PM today.

More
Environmental History Seminar POSTPONED Amputated from the Land: Black Refugees from America and the Neglected Voices of Environmental History 12 February 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Bryon Williams, Academy at Penguin Hall Comment: John Stauffer, Harvard University This event has been POSTPONED due to inclement weather. This paper focuses on dictated narratives ...

This event has been POSTPONED due to inclement weather.

This paper focuses on dictated narratives from the 1840s and ‘50s, accounts delivered by blacks who fled the U.S. to settle in the wilds of Ontario. These first-person accounts of environmental encounter and expertise are unrivaled in depth, breadth, and detail among black ecological writing of any era. New environmental histories need such accounts that not only counter dominant American environmental and political myths, but offer black-lived stories of environmental belonging and agency.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
Public Program, Conversation Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize Ceremony 13 February 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Douglas L. Winiarski and Stephen Marini Registration is required at no cost. Please join us for a special evening in which Douglas L. Winiarski will receive the 2018 Gomes Prize ...

Please join us for a special evening in which Douglas L. Winiarski will receive the 2018 Gomes Prize for Darkness Falls on the Land of Light: Experiencing Religious Awakenings in 18th-Century New England. Winiarski will join historian Stephen Marini in a conversation about religious revivalism and the shaping influence of religious awakenings on faith and culture in eighteenth-century New England.

 

 

More
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 16 February 2019.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

 

More
Library Closed Library Closed 18 February 2019.Monday, all day The Library and Exhibition Galleries are CLOSED for Presidents' Day. The building opens at 5:00PM ...

The Library and Exhibition Galleries are CLOSED for Presidents' Day. The building opens at 5:00PM for visitors attending the evening program.

More
Public Program, Author Talk Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson & America’s Journey from Slavery to Segregation 18 February 2019.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Steve Luxenberg, Washington Post Associate Editor There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Steve Luxenberg presents a myth-shattering narrative of how a nation embraced &ldquo ...

Steve Luxenberg presents a myth-shattering narrative of how a nation embraced “separation” and its pernicious consequences. Plessy v. Ferguson, the Supreme Court case synonymous with “separate but equal,” created remarkably little stir when the justices announced their near-unanimous decision on May 18, 1896. Yet it is one of the most compelling and dramatic stories of the nineteenth century, whose outcome embraced and protected segregation, and whose reverberations are still felt into the twenty-first.

 

 

More
History of Women and Gender Seminar Panel: Feminist Economics 19 February 2019.Tuesday, 5:30PM - 7:45PM Location: Knafel Center, Radcliffe Institute Danielle L. Dumaine, University of Connecticut, and Julie R. Enszer, University of Mississippi Comment: Juliet Schor, Boston College These papers begin a conversation on the intersection of the study of the women’s liberation ...

These papers begin a conversation on the intersection of the study of the women’s liberation movement with the history of capitalism. Danielle Dumaine’s paper, “Sisterhood of Debt: Feminist Credit Unions, Community, and Women’s Liberation,” examines the role of Feminist Credit Unions in the women’s liberation movement. Julie Enszer’s paper, “‘a feminist understanding of economics based on a revolutionary set of values’: Feminist Economic Theories and Practices,” looks at the feminist organizations that created the Feminist Economic Network.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
Teacher Workshop Teaching the Industrial Revolution in Massachusetts 20 February 2019.Wednesday, 9:30AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $25 per person Lowell’s water-powered textile mills catapulted the nation – including immigrant ...

Lowell’s water-powered textile mills catapulted the nation – including immigrant families and early female factory workers – into an uncertain new industrial era. Nearly 200 years later, the changes that began here still reverberate in our shifting global economy. Hosted in partnership with the Tsongas Industrial History Center, this workshop will explore the history of industrial growth in New England and its impact on immigration, labor movements, women’s rights, and communities in New England and beyond.

Note: This workshop will be taking place off-site at the Tsongas Industrial History Center in Lowell, MA.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

 

More
Public Program, Conversation Uncivil Society 21 February 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Julian E. Zelizer, Princeton University; Michael Tomasky, Democracy; and Robin Young, WBUR and NPR There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). American political discourse has become so dysfunctional it is hard to imagine reaching a national ...

American political discourse has become so dysfunctional it is hard to imagine reaching a national consensus on almost anything. Longstanding historical fault lines over income inequality, racial division, gender roles, and sexual norms coupled with starkly different senses of economic opportunity in rural and urban America have fueled a polarized political landscape. Julian E. Zelizer, Fault Lines: A History of the United States Since 1974, and Michael Tomasky, If We Can Keep It: How the Republic Collapsed and How it Might Be Saved, and Robin Young, co-host of Here & Now on WBUR and NPR, will discuss how we got here and if there is a way back.

 

 

 

More
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 23 February 2019.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

More
Public Program, Conversation Begin at the Beginning: “A water to comfort ye hearte”: 17th century medical recipes 23 February 2019.Saturday, 1:00PM - 3:00PM THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT In the 1600s, housewives were called upon to be healers. ...

THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT

In the 1600s, housewives were called upon to be healers. They had a wealth of recipes available to them for a variety of ailments. In this reading discussion group, we will utilize recipes from both manuscript and print collections to delve into the world of lay medicine in the 1600s.

This is a discussion group co-hosted by the Massachusetts Historical Society and the Partnership of Historic Bostons. To learn more visit: http://www.historicbostons.org/ 

More
Modern American Society and Culture Seminar Canceled: Our Own Orient: Mecca, California, and Dates 26 February 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Eleanor Daly Finnegan, Harvard University Comment: Laura Barraclough, Yale University Residents changed the name of Walters, California to Mecca in 1904. They were trying to use the ...

Residents changed the name of Walters, California to Mecca in 1904. They were trying to use the exoticism of the Middle East to sell dates. This paper will focus on Mecca, California and the Indio Date Festival, looking at the complicated ways in which Orientalism has changed in the United States, its relationship to consumerism, and the economic connections made to the Middle East.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
Public Program You Are What You Wear? Navigating Fashion & Politics in New England, 1760s–1770s 27 February 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception 5:30. Kimberly Alexander, University of New Hampshire There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Our guest curator will explore the social values placed on luxury and thrift in New England in the ...

Our guest curator will explore the social values placed on luxury and thrift in New England in the late 18th century. What messages were telegraphed by a person’s clothing and how were these understood? Did everyone in society read these messages the same way or were there statements only meant to be understood by a select few?

 

 

More
Public Program, Conversation The Great Molasses Flood Revisited: Labor and the Molasses Flood 28 February 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-program reception at 5:30. Stephen Puleo; Robert Forrant, UMass Lowell; Carlos Aramayo, and moderator Karilyn Crockett Please note: This program will be held at Old South Meeting House. After the collapse of an industrial tank of molasses left a North End neighborhood devastated, a ...

After the collapse of an industrial tank of molasses left a North End neighborhood devastated, a legal battle for reparations ensued, prompting questions about the role and responsibilities of businesses within a community. Using the Molasses Flood as an historical backdrop, this panel will explore questions around labor rights and safety, the function of government regulations and the relationship between the public and big business interests; issues that still resonate today as modern Bostonians grapple with a changing corporate landscape and city-wide gentrification.

This program is a collaboration between the MHS and Old South Meeting House. It will be held at Old South Meeting House at 310 Washington Street, Boston, MA 02108.

This program is made possible with funding from the Lowell Institute.

 

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March 2019
Building Closed MHS Closed 2 March 2019.Saturday, 12:00AM - 11:59PM Due to inclement weather, the MHS is CLOSED on Saturday, 2 March.

Due to inclement weather, the MHS is CLOSED on Saturday, 2 March.

More
MHS Tour Canceled: The History and Collections of the MHS 2 March 2019.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

 

More
Building Closed MHS Closed 4 March 2019.Monday, 12:00AM - 11:59PM Due to inclement weather, the MHS is CLOSED on Monday, March 4th.

Due to inclement weather, the MHS is CLOSED on Monday, March 4th.

More
Early American History Seminar Washington, Lincoln, and Weems: Recovering the Parson's Life of George Washington 5 March 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Steven C. Bullock, Worcester Polytechnic Institute Comment: Elizabeth Maddock-Dillon, Northeastern University (Previously titled Parson Weems: Maker and Remaker) This paper argues that Mason Locke Weems&rsquo ...

(Previously titled Parson Weems: Maker and Remaker)

This paper argues that Mason Locke Weems’s biography of George Washington built a bridge between Washington and the world of Abraham Lincoln and Ellen Montgomery. Weems’s stories were not just expressing early-19th century cultural commonplaces, but helping to create them. The paper connects these transformations with Weems’s work to recover Weems’s importance within his own time.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
Brown Bag A Meaningful Subjection: Coercive Inequality and Indigenous Political Economy in the Colonial Northeast 6 March 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Peter Olsen-Harbich, College of William and Mary This talk presents archaeological and documentary evidence of indigenous authority structures and ...

This talk presents archaeological and documentary evidence of indigenous authority structures and law enforcement in northeastern North America in the period immediately prior to European settlement. It then evaluates European comprehension of indigenous mechanisms of rule enforcement, and the degree to which awareness of them factored into designs for colonization.

More
Notice Library Opening at Noon 6 March 2019.Wednesday, all day To accommodate an all-staff meeting the library will delay opening until 12:00 PM on Wednesday, ...

To accommodate an all-staff meeting the library will delay opening until 12:00 PM on Wednesday, March 6.

More
Public Program, Author Talk Household Gods: The Religious Lives of the Adams Family 6 March 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception 5:30. Sara Georgini, MHS There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Reflecting on his past, President John Adams mused that it was religion that had shaped his ...

Reflecting on his past, President John Adams mused that it was religion that had shaped his family’s fortunes and young America’s future. Globetrotters who chronicled their religious journeys extensively, the Adamses ultimately developed a cosmopolitan Christianity that blended discovery and criticism, faith and doubt. Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/abigail_adams_1764_image.jpgSara Georgini demonstrates how pivotal Christianity—as the different generations understood it—was in shaping the family’s decisions, great and small.

This event is part of our Remember Abigail programming.

 

 

More
African American History Seminar, Seminar (Rescheduled) Mourning in America: Black Men in a White House 7 March 2019.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Leah Wright Rigueur, Harvard Kennedy School Comment: Elizabeth Hinton, Harvard University (Rescheduled from Feb. 21) This paper focuses on the 1980s HUD Scandal, wherein contractors, ...

(Rescheduled from Feb. 21)

This paper focuses on the 1980s HUD Scandal, wherein contractors, developers, lobbyists, HUD officials, and others misappropriated billions in federal monies set aside for low-income housing. Of particular interest are the intertwined stories of two African Americans: Samuel R. Pierce, Ronald Reagan’s HUD Secretary, and Kimi Gray, a Washington, D.C. public housing activist. In exploring these narratives, this paper aims to complicate our understanding of the “Black 1980s,” the Ronald Reagan-led White House, and democracy in post-civil rights America.

 

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

More
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 9 March 2019.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

 

More
More events
Public Program, Author Talk Lincoln & the Jews: A History 11 February 2019.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Jonathan D. Sarna, Brandeis University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Historian Jonathan D. Sarna reveals how Lincoln’s remarkable relationship with American Jews impacted both his path to the presidency and his policy decisions as president. Expressing a uniquely deep knowledge of the Old Testament, employing its language and concepts in some of his most important writings, Lincoln also befriended Jews from a young age, promoted Jewish equality, and appointed numerous Jews to public office.

 

 

close

Building Closed Building Closing at 1:00 PM 12 February 2019.Tuesday, all day

Due to forecasted weather conditions the MHS will be closing at 1:00 PM today.

close

Environmental History Seminar POSTPONED Amputated from the Land: Black Refugees from America and the Neglected Voices of Environmental History 12 February 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Bryon Williams, Academy at Penguin Hall Comment: John Stauffer, Harvard University

This event has been POSTPONED due to inclement weather.

This paper focuses on dictated narratives from the 1840s and ‘50s, accounts delivered by blacks who fled the U.S. to settle in the wilds of Ontario. These first-person accounts of environmental encounter and expertise are unrivaled in depth, breadth, and detail among black ecological writing of any era. New environmental histories need such accounts that not only counter dominant American environmental and political myths, but offer black-lived stories of environmental belonging and agency.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close

Public Program, Conversation Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize Ceremony 13 February 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Douglas L. Winiarski and Stephen Marini Registration is required at no cost.

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

Please join us for a special evening in which Douglas L. Winiarski will receive the 2018 Gomes Prize for Darkness Falls on the Land of Light: Experiencing Religious Awakenings in 18th-Century New England. Winiarski will join historian Stephen Marini in a conversation about religious revivalism and the shaping influence of religious awakenings on faith and culture in eighteenth-century New England.

 

 

close

MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 16 February 2019.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

 

close

Library Closed Library Closed 18 February 2019.Monday, all day

The Library and Exhibition Galleries are CLOSED for Presidents' Day. The building opens at 5:00PM for visitors attending the evening program.

close

Public Program, Author Talk Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson & America’s Journey from Slavery to Segregation 18 February 2019.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Steve Luxenberg, Washington Post Associate Editor There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Steve Luxenberg presents a myth-shattering narrative of how a nation embraced “separation” and its pernicious consequences. Plessy v. Ferguson, the Supreme Court case synonymous with “separate but equal,” created remarkably little stir when the justices announced their near-unanimous decision on May 18, 1896. Yet it is one of the most compelling and dramatic stories of the nineteenth century, whose outcome embraced and protected segregation, and whose reverberations are still felt into the twenty-first.

 

 

close

History of Women and Gender Seminar Panel: Feminist Economics 19 February 2019.Tuesday, 5:30PM - 7:45PM Location: Knafel Center, Radcliffe Institute Danielle L. Dumaine, University of Connecticut, and Julie R. Enszer, University of Mississippi Comment: Juliet Schor, Boston College

These papers begin a conversation on the intersection of the study of the women’s liberation movement with the history of capitalism. Danielle Dumaine’s paper, “Sisterhood of Debt: Feminist Credit Unions, Community, and Women’s Liberation,” examines the role of Feminist Credit Unions in the women’s liberation movement. Julie Enszer’s paper, “‘a feminist understanding of economics based on a revolutionary set of values’: Feminist Economic Theories and Practices,” looks at the feminist organizations that created the Feminist Economic Network.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close

Teacher Workshop Teaching the Industrial Revolution in Massachusetts 20 February 2019.Wednesday, 9:30AM - 4:00PM Registration fee: $25 per person

Lowell’s water-powered textile mills catapulted the nation – including immigrant families and early female factory workers – into an uncertain new industrial era. Nearly 200 years later, the changes that began here still reverberate in our shifting global economy. Hosted in partnership with the Tsongas Industrial History Center, this workshop will explore the history of industrial growth in New England and its impact on immigration, labor movements, women’s rights, and communities in New England and beyond.

Note: This workshop will be taking place off-site at the Tsongas Industrial History Center in Lowell, MA.

This program is open to all K-12 educators. Teachers can earn 22.5 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

 

close

Public Program, Conversation Uncivil Society 21 February 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Julian E. Zelizer, Princeton University; Michael Tomasky, Democracy; and Robin Young, WBUR and NPR There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Watch the recording of this event, embedded below:

American political discourse has become so dysfunctional it is hard to imagine reaching a national consensus on almost anything. Longstanding historical fault lines over income inequality, racial division, gender roles, and sexual norms coupled with starkly different senses of economic opportunity in rural and urban America have fueled a polarized political landscape. Julian E. Zelizer, Fault Lines: A History of the United States Since 1974, and Michael Tomasky, If We Can Keep It: How the Republic Collapsed and How it Might Be Saved, and Robin Young, co-host of Here & Now on WBUR and NPR, will discuss how we got here and if there is a way back.

 

 

 

close

MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 23 February 2019.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

close

Public Program, Conversation Begin at the Beginning: “A water to comfort ye hearte”: 17th century medical recipes 23 February 2019.Saturday, 1:00PM - 3:00PM

THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT

In the 1600s, housewives were called upon to be healers. They had a wealth of recipes available to them for a variety of ailments. In this reading discussion group, we will utilize recipes from both manuscript and print collections to delve into the world of lay medicine in the 1600s.

This is a discussion group co-hosted by the Massachusetts Historical Society and the Partnership of Historic Bostons. To learn more visit: http://www.historicbostons.org/ 

close

Modern American Society and Culture Seminar Canceled:
Our Own Orient: Mecca, California, and Dates
26 February 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Eleanor Daly Finnegan, Harvard University Comment: Laura Barraclough, Yale University

Residents changed the name of Walters, California to Mecca in 1904. They were trying to use the exoticism of the Middle East to sell dates. This paper will focus on Mecca, California and the Indio Date Festival, looking at the complicated ways in which Orientalism has changed in the United States, its relationship to consumerism, and the economic connections made to the Middle East.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close

Public Program You Are What You Wear? Navigating Fashion & Politics in New England, 1760s–1770s 27 February 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception 5:30. Kimberly Alexander, University of New Hampshire There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Our guest curator will explore the social values placed on luxury and thrift in New England in the late 18th century. What messages were telegraphed by a person’s clothing and how were these understood? Did everyone in society read these messages the same way or were there statements only meant to be understood by a select few?

 

 

close

Public Program, Conversation The Great Molasses Flood Revisited: Labor and the Molasses Flood 28 February 2019.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-program reception at 5:30. Stephen Puleo; Robert Forrant, UMass Lowell; Carlos Aramayo, and moderator Karilyn Crockett Please note: This program will be held at Old South Meeting House.

After the collapse of an industrial tank of molasses left a North End neighborhood devastated, a legal battle for reparations ensued, prompting questions about the role and responsibilities of businesses within a community. Using the Molasses Flood as an historical backdrop, this panel will explore questions around labor rights and safety, the function of government regulations and the relationship between the public and big business interests; issues that still resonate today as modern Bostonians grapple with a changing corporate landscape and city-wide gentrification.

This program is a collaboration between the MHS and Old South Meeting House. It will be held at Old South Meeting House at 310 Washington Street, Boston, MA 02108.

This program is made possible with funding from the Lowell Institute.

 

close

Building Closed MHS Closed 2 March 2019.Saturday, 12:00AM - 11:59PM

Due to inclement weather, the MHS is CLOSED on Saturday, 2 March.

close

MHS Tour Canceled:
The History and Collections of the MHS
2 March 2019.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

 

close

Building Closed MHS Closed 4 March 2019.Monday, 12:00AM - 11:59PM

Due to inclement weather, the MHS is CLOSED on Monday, March 4th.

close

Early American History Seminar Washington, Lincoln, and Weems: Recovering the Parson's Life of George Washington 5 March 2019.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Steven C. Bullock, Worcester Polytechnic Institute Comment: Elizabeth Maddock-Dillon, Northeastern University

(Previously titled Parson Weems: Maker and Remaker)

This paper argues that Mason Locke Weems’s biography of George Washington built a bridge between Washington and the world of Abraham Lincoln and Ellen Montgomery. Weems’s stories were not just expressing early-19th century cultural commonplaces, but helping to create them. The paper connects these transformations with Weems’s work to recover Weems’s importance within his own time.

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close

Brown Bag A Meaningful Subjection: Coercive Inequality and Indigenous Political Economy in the Colonial Northeast 6 March 2019.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Peter Olsen-Harbich, College of William and Mary

This talk presents archaeological and documentary evidence of indigenous authority structures and law enforcement in northeastern North America in the period immediately prior to European settlement. It then evaluates European comprehension of indigenous mechanisms of rule enforcement, and the degree to which awareness of them factored into designs for colonization.

close

Notice Library Opening at Noon 6 March 2019.Wednesday, all day

To accommodate an all-staff meeting the library will delay opening until 12:00 PM on Wednesday, March 6.

close

Public Program, Author Talk Household Gods: The Religious Lives of the Adams Family 6 March 2019.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception 5:30. Sara Georgini, MHS There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Reflecting on his past, President John Adams mused that it was religion that had shaped his family’s fortunes and young America’s future. Globetrotters who chronicled their religious journeys extensively, the Adamses ultimately developed a cosmopolitan Christianity that blended discovery and criticism, faith and doubt. Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/abigail_adams_1764_image.jpgSara Georgini demonstrates how pivotal Christianity—as the different generations understood it—was in shaping the family’s decisions, great and small.

This event is part of our Remember Abigail programming.

 

 

close

African American History Seminar, Seminar (Rescheduled) Mourning in America: Black Men in a White House 7 March 2019.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Leah Wright Rigueur, Harvard Kennedy School Comment: Elizabeth Hinton, Harvard University

(Rescheduled from Feb. 21)

This paper focuses on the 1980s HUD Scandal, wherein contractors, developers, lobbyists, HUD officials, and others misappropriated billions in federal monies set aside for low-income housing. Of particular interest are the intertwined stories of two African Americans: Samuel R. Pierce, Ronald Reagan’s HUD Secretary, and Kimi Gray, a Washington, D.C. public housing activist. In exploring these narratives, this paper aims to complicate our understanding of the “Black 1980s,” the Ronald Reagan-led White House, and democracy in post-civil rights America.

 

To RSVP: email seminars@masshist.org or call (617) 646-0579.

close

MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 9 March 2019.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

 

 

 

close


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