July

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Building Closed Independence Day 4 July 2018.Wednesday, all day The MHS library and exhibition galleries are CLOSED for Independence Day.

The MHS library and exhibition galleries are CLOSED for Independence Day.

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Brown Bag Disestablishing Virtue: Federalism, Religion, and New England Women Writers 11 July 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Gretchen Murphy, University of Texas at Austin This talk examines the religious expressions of 18th- and 19th-century female Federalist writers, ...

This talk examines the religious expressions of 18th- and 19th-century female Federalist writers, specifically Catharine Sedgwick, in the context of the Federalist commitment to public religion. Sedgwick’s 1824 novel Redwood looks to the French Revolution as a site of U.S. debate about role of religion in a republic, signaling her interest in her father’s earlier Federalism while staking her position in the Unitarian controversy of the early 1800s.

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Public Program Boston Historical Reception 11 July 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-event reception at 5:30 Hosted by Anita Walker, Mass Cultural Council There is no “Boston Historical Society,” but the metro area does have a wealth of ...

There is no “Boston Historical Society,” but the metro area does have a wealth of history organizations. Boston and surrounding towns are steeped in local history and the inhabitants are proud of their local identity. The MHS is pleased to hold a reception for history buffs and representatives of local organizations to mingle, share recent accomplishments, and talk about the great projects on which they are working.

More
Teacher Workshopbegins Loyalism in the Era of the American Revolution 18 July 2018.Wednesday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   Registration fee: $50 per person People did not become loyalists; it was the patriots who first began to craft an identity different ...

People did not become loyalists; it was the patriots who first began to craft an identity different from that of a loyal British subject.  In the struggle over identity and ideology, families were torn apart, friendships were broken, and lifelong residents of Massachusetts were forced to surrender their homes and possessions. Through letters, diaries, newspapers, propaganda, and historical sites, our workshop will introduce teachers to some of the people and places implicated in debates over loyalism between 1770 and 1785. 

This program is open to all K-12 educators.  Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at kmelchior@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

More
Public Program, Author Talk Back Bay through Time 19 July 2018.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Anthony Sammarco There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood is not just a quintessential Victorian neighborhood of the 19th ...

Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood is not just a quintessential Victorian neighborhood of the 19th century but one that was infilled and planned as the premier residential and institutional development. in this photographic history of the Back Bay of Boston, Anthony M. Sammarco, with the contemporary photographs of Peter B. Kingman, has created a fascinating book that chronicles the neighborhood from the late 19th century through to today.

More
Teacher Workshopends Loyalism in the Era of the American Revolution 20 July 2018.Friday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   Registration fee: $50 per person People did not become loyalists; it was the patriots who first began to craft an identity different ...

People did not become loyalists; it was the patriots who first began to craft an identity different from that of a loyal British subject.  In the struggle over identity and ideology, families were torn apart, friendships were broken, and lifelong residents of Massachusetts were forced to surrender their homes and possessions. Through letters, diaries, newspapers, propaganda, and historical sites, our workshop will introduce teachers to some of the people and places implicated in debates over loyalism between 1770 and 1785. 

This program is open to all K-12 educators.  Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at kmelchior@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

More
Public Program Gallery Talk: Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End 21 July 2018.Saturday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Clark Pearce Gallery Talk Guest curator and American furniture specialist Clark Pearce will lead visitors through the ...

Guest curator and American furniture specialist Clark Pearce will lead visitors through the exhibition’s highlights while giving deeper context to the life and work of two extraordinary Massachusetts craftsmen, Isaac Vose and Thomas Seymour.

More
Public Program, Author Talk Blood & Ivy: The 1849 Murder That Scandalized Harvard 25 July 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Paul Collins, Portland State University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders). On November 23, 1849, in the heart of Boston, one of the city’s richest men, Dr. George ...

On November 23, 1849, in the heart of Boston, one of the city’s richest men, Dr. George Parkman, vanished. What resulted was a baffling case of red herrings, grave robbery, and dismemberment on the grounds of Harvard Medical School. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts v. John White Webster pioneered the use of medical forensics and the meaning of reasonable doubt. Paul Collins brings 19th-century Boston back to life in vivid detail, weaving together accounts of one of America’s greatest murder mysteries.

More
August
Brown Bag “The Sons of Britain”: Partisanship & the Origins of the American Revolution in New York City 1 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Christopher Minty, Adams Papers, Massachusetts Historical Society In 1775, New York City merchant Frederick Rhinelander told a friend, “if this province ever ...

In 1775, New York City merchant Frederick Rhinelander told a friend, “if this province ever fights, it will be for the King.” Yet Rhinelander’s reasons were not based on New Yorkers’ blind loyalty to George III or Great Britain. Instead, for him and many of his friends, loyalism was a tool to challenge political opponents.

More
Teacher Workshopbegins The Reconstruction Era: History and Legacy 8 August 2018.Wednesday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   Registration fee: $50 per person This workshop will explore the era and legacy of Reconstruction in American history and society, ...

This workshop will explore the era and legacy of Reconstruction in American history and society, from the aftermath of the war to the role it plays in current issues today.  We will discuss the effects of Reconstruction on African American and Native American communities, its civic and legal legacies, memory of the period and of the violence that followed, and local heroes who fought for civil rights in the wake of the Civil War.

This program is open to all K-12 educators.  Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at kmelchior@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

More
Brown Bag The World Becomes Round: Cultural and Commercial Connections between Bombay Parsis and Yankees, 1771-1861 8 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jennifer Rose, Claremont Graduate University This talk focuses on the commercial and cultural connections between New Englanders and Parsis in ...

This talk focuses on the commercial and cultural connections between New Englanders and Parsis in Bombay from the 1770s to the 1850s. Commercially, the Parsis began to act as agent-brokers for Massachusetts merchants in the late 1780s. But Parsi Zoroastrian religious ideas and rituals were already known to at least a few readers in New England by spring of 1772, when the first European translations of Zoroastrian texts were sent, at Benjamin Franklin’s recommendation, to the Redwood Athenaeum’s librarian.

More
Teacher Workshopends The Reconstruction Era: History and Legacy 10 August 2018.Friday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   Registration fee: $50 per person This workshop will explore the era and legacy of Reconstruction in American history and society, ...

This workshop will explore the era and legacy of Reconstruction in American history and society, from the aftermath of the war to the role it plays in current issues today.  We will discuss the effects of Reconstruction on African American and Native American communities, its civic and legal legacies, memory of the period and of the violence that followed, and local heroes who fought for civil rights in the wake of the Civil War.

This program is open to all K-12 educators.  Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at kmelchior@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

More
Teacher Workshopbegins Lawrence v. Texas and LGBTQ Rights 15 August 2018.Wednesday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   Registration fee: $50 per person In 2003, the pivotal case of Lawrence v. Texas overturned the Texas Homosexuality Conduct Law ...

In 2003, the pivotal case of Lawrence v. Texas overturned the Texas Homosexuality Conduct Law, decriminalizing “homosexuality” and paving the way for marriage equality.  During the case, lawyers and justices of the United States Supreme Court relied heavily on historical precedent, referencing everything from colonial sodomy laws to interracial marriage in their exploration of fundamental rights. Working with partners at History UnErased, we will examine the road to Lawrence v. Texas and its legacy in American society. 

This program is open to all K-12 educators.  Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at kmelchior@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

More
Brown Bag The Octopus’s Other Tentacles: The United Fruit Company, Congress, Dictators, & Exiles against the Guatemalan Revolution 15 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Aaron Moulton, Stephen F. Austin University With the 1954 U.S. government-backed overthrow of Guatemalan president Jacobo Arbenz, scholars have ...

With the 1954 U.S. government-backed overthrow of Guatemalan president Jacobo Arbenz, scholars have focused on ties between the State Department, the CIA, and el pulpo, the octopus, the United Fruit Company. This talk reveals how the Company's influence reached further to Boston-based congresspersons, Caribbean Basin dictators, and Guatemalan exiles.

More
Teacher Workshopends Lawrence v. Texas and LGBTQ Rights 17 August 2018.Friday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   Registration fee: $50 per person In 2003, the pivotal case of Lawrence v. Texas overturned the Texas Homosexuality Conduct Law ...

In 2003, the pivotal case of Lawrence v. Texas overturned the Texas Homosexuality Conduct Law, decriminalizing “homosexuality” and paving the way for marriage equality.  During the case, lawyers and justices of the United States Supreme Court relied heavily on historical precedent, referencing everything from colonial sodomy laws to interracial marriage in their exploration of fundamental rights. Working with partners at History UnErased, we will examine the road to Lawrence v. Texas and its legacy in American society. 

This program is open to all K-12 educators.  Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at kmelchior@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

More
Brown Bag Re-categorizing Americans: Difference, Distinction, and Belonging in the Dillingham Commission (1907-1911) 22 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Sunmin Kim, University of California, Berkeley This talk traces how the federal government surveyed immigrants in the early-20th century and how ...

This talk traces how the federal government surveyed immigrants in the early-20th century and how such attempts helped solidify the racial boundary-making for the nation. By dissecting the tenuous connections between racist ideology, state power, and social science knowledge, this talk provides an empirical account of how categories such as race and ethnicity emerge from confusion and contradiction in knowledge production.

More
September
Isaac Vose Couch Exhibitionends Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End: The Furniture of Isaac Vose & Thomas Seymour, 1815 to 1825 14 September 2018.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Virtually forgotten for 200 years, Isaac Vose and his brilliant furniture are revealed in a new ...

Virtually forgotten for 200 years, Isaac Vose and his brilliant furniture are revealed in a new exhibition and accompanying volume. Beginning with a modest pair of collection boxes he made for his localBoston church in 1788, Vose went on to build a substantial business empire and to make furniture for the most prominent Boston families. The exhibition and catalog restore Vose from relative obscurity to his rightful position as one of Boston’s most important craftsmen. Opening at the MHS on May 11, the exhibition will be on view through September 14.

The complementary book, Rather Elegant Than Showy (May 2018), by Robert Mussey and Clark Pearce, will be available for sale at the MHS.

Image: Couch, Isaac Vose & Son, with Thomas Wightman, carver, Boston, 1824. Historic New England, Gift of the Massachusetts Historical Society (1923.507); photograph by David Bohl.

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More events
Building Closed Independence Day 4 July 2018.Wednesday, all day

The MHS library and exhibition galleries are CLOSED for Independence Day.

close
Brown Bag Disestablishing Virtue: Federalism, Religion, and New England Women Writers this event is free 11 July 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Gretchen Murphy, University of Texas at Austin

This talk examines the religious expressions of 18th- and 19th-century female Federalist writers, specifically Catharine Sedgwick, in the context of the Federalist commitment to public religion. Sedgwick’s 1824 novel Redwood looks to the French Revolution as a site of U.S. debate about role of religion in a republic, signaling her interest in her father’s earlier Federalism while staking her position in the Unitarian controversy of the early 1800s.

close
Public Program Boston Historical Reception registration required at no cost 11 July 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-event reception at 5:30 Hosted by Anita Walker, Mass Cultural Council

There is no “Boston Historical Society,” but the metro area does have a wealth of history organizations. Boston and surrounding towns are steeped in local history and the inhabitants are proud of their local identity. The MHS is pleased to hold a reception for history buffs and representatives of local organizations to mingle, share recent accomplishments, and talk about the great projects on which they are working.

close
Teacher Workshop Loyalism in the Era of the American Revolution Please RSVP   registration required 18 July 2018 to 20 July 2018 Registration fee: $50 per person

People did not become loyalists; it was the patriots who first began to craft an identity different from that of a loyal British subject.  In the struggle over identity and ideology, families were torn apart, friendships were broken, and lifelong residents of Massachusetts were forced to surrender their homes and possessions. Through letters, diaries, newspapers, propaganda, and historical sites, our workshop will introduce teachers to some of the people and places implicated in debates over loyalism between 1770 and 1785. 

This program is open to all K-12 educators.  Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at kmelchior@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

close
Public Program, Author Talk Back Bay through Time registration required 19 July 2018.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Anthony Sammarco There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood is not just a quintessential Victorian neighborhood of the 19th century but one that was infilled and planned as the premier residential and institutional development. in this photographic history of the Back Bay of Boston, Anthony M. Sammarco, with the contemporary photographs of Peter B. Kingman, has created a fascinating book that chronicles the neighborhood from the late 19th century through to today.

close
Public Program Gallery Talk: Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End this event is free 21 July 2018.Saturday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Clark Pearce Gallery Talk

Guest curator and American furniture specialist Clark Pearce will lead visitors through the exhibition’s highlights while giving deeper context to the life and work of two extraordinary Massachusetts craftsmen, Isaac Vose and Thomas Seymour.

close
Public Program, Author Talk Blood & Ivy: The 1849 Murder That Scandalized Harvard registration required 25 July 2018.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Paul Collins, Portland State University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members or EBT cardholders).

On November 23, 1849, in the heart of Boston, one of the city’s richest men, Dr. George Parkman, vanished. What resulted was a baffling case of red herrings, grave robbery, and dismemberment on the grounds of Harvard Medical School. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts v. John White Webster pioneered the use of medical forensics and the meaning of reasonable doubt. Paul Collins brings 19th-century Boston back to life in vivid detail, weaving together accounts of one of America’s greatest murder mysteries.

close
Brown Bag “The Sons of Britain”: Partisanship & the Origins of the American Revolution in New York City this event is free 1 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Christopher Minty, Adams Papers, Massachusetts Historical Society

In 1775, New York City merchant Frederick Rhinelander told a friend, “if this province ever fights, it will be for the King.” Yet Rhinelander’s reasons were not based on New Yorkers’ blind loyalty to George III or Great Britain. Instead, for him and many of his friends, loyalism was a tool to challenge political opponents.

close
Teacher Workshop The Reconstruction Era: History and Legacy Please RSVP   registration required 8 August 2018 to 10 August 2018 Registration fee: $50 per person

This workshop will explore the era and legacy of Reconstruction in American history and society, from the aftermath of the war to the role it plays in current issues today.  We will discuss the effects of Reconstruction on African American and Native American communities, its civic and legal legacies, memory of the period and of the violence that followed, and local heroes who fought for civil rights in the wake of the Civil War.

This program is open to all K-12 educators.  Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at kmelchior@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

close
Brown Bag The World Becomes Round: Cultural and Commercial Connections between Bombay Parsis and Yankees, 1771-1861 this event is free 8 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jennifer Rose, Claremont Graduate University

This talk focuses on the commercial and cultural connections between New Englanders and Parsis in Bombay from the 1770s to the 1850s. Commercially, the Parsis began to act as agent-brokers for Massachusetts merchants in the late 1780s. But Parsi Zoroastrian religious ideas and rituals were already known to at least a few readers in New England by spring of 1772, when the first European translations of Zoroastrian texts were sent, at Benjamin Franklin’s recommendation, to the Redwood Athenaeum’s librarian.

close
Teacher Workshop Lawrence v. Texas and LGBTQ Rights Please RSVP   registration required 15 August 2018 to 17 August 2018 Registration fee: $50 per person

In 2003, the pivotal case of Lawrence v. Texas overturned the Texas Homosexuality Conduct Law, decriminalizing “homosexuality” and paving the way for marriage equality.  During the case, lawyers and justices of the United States Supreme Court relied heavily on historical precedent, referencing everything from colonial sodomy laws to interracial marriage in their exploration of fundamental rights. Working with partners at History UnErased, we will examine the road to Lawrence v. Texas and its legacy in American society. 

This program is open to all K-12 educators.  Teachers can earn 45 Professional Development Points or 1 graduate credit (for an additional fee).

If you have any questions, please contact Kate Melchior at kmelchior@masshist.org or 617-646-0588.

close
Brown Bag The Octopus’s Other Tentacles: The United Fruit Company, Congress, Dictators, & Exiles against the Guatemalan Revolution this event is free 15 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Aaron Moulton, Stephen F. Austin University

With the 1954 U.S. government-backed overthrow of Guatemalan president Jacobo Arbenz, scholars have focused on ties between the State Department, the CIA, and el pulpo, the octopus, the United Fruit Company. This talk reveals how the Company's influence reached further to Boston-based congresspersons, Caribbean Basin dictators, and Guatemalan exiles.

close
Brown Bag Re-categorizing Americans: Difference, Distinction, and Belonging in the Dillingham Commission (1907-1911) this event is free 22 August 2018.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Sunmin Kim, University of California, Berkeley

This talk traces how the federal government surveyed immigrants in the early-20th century and how such attempts helped solidify the racial boundary-making for the nation. By dissecting the tenuous connections between racist ideology, state power, and social science knowledge, this talk provides an empirical account of how categories such as race and ethnicity emerge from confusion and contradiction in knowledge production.

close
Exhibition Entrepreneurship & Classical Design in Boston’s South End: The Furniture of Isaac Vose & Thomas Seymour, 1815 to 1825 this event is free 14 September 2018.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Isaac Vose Couch

Virtually forgotten for 200 years, Isaac Vose and his brilliant furniture are revealed in a new exhibition and accompanying volume. Beginning with a modest pair of collection boxes he made for his localBoston church in 1788, Vose went on to build a substantial business empire and to make furniture for the most prominent Boston families. The exhibition and catalog restore Vose from relative obscurity to his rightful position as one of Boston’s most important craftsmen. Opening at the MHS on May 11, the exhibition will be on view through September 14.

The complementary book, Rather Elegant Than Showy (May 2018), by Robert Mussey and Clark Pearce, will be available for sale at the MHS.

Image: Couch, Isaac Vose & Son, with Thomas Wightman, carver, Boston, 1824. Historic New England, Gift of the Massachusetts Historical Society (1923.507); photograph by David Bohl.

close

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