Immigration and Urban History Seminar

Exhibition

The Private Jefferson

Explore Jefferson’s complexity through select correspondence and writings including the Declaration of Independence, records of farming at Monticello, and his architectural drawings.

Details

Call for Papers: Deadline: March 15, 2016

The Boston Seminar in Immigration and Urban History invites proposals for sessions in its 2016-2017 series. The Seminar’s steering committee welcomes suggestions for papers dealing with all aspects of American immigration and urban history and culture. Programs are not confined to Massachusetts topics, nor are they limited to the research of historians.  Papers comparing the American experience with developments elsewhere in the world are welcome. For more information, view the CFP

 

Subscribe to this seminar series for $25, and you will receive access to the seminar papers for THREE series: the Boston Area Early American History Seminar, the Boston Environmental History Seminar, and the Boston Immigration and Urban History Seminar. We recognize that topics frequently resonate across these three fields; now, mix and match the seminars that you attend!

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The Boston Immigration and Urban History Seminar provides a setting for local scholars as well as members of the general public to discuss all aspects of American immigration as well as urban history and culture. Programs may address one or both historical disciplines and are not confined to Massachusetts topics. Six to eight sessions take place annually during the academic year, and most focus on works in progress.

Seminar meetings revolve around the discussion of a precirculated paper. Sessions open with remarks from the essayist and an assigned commentator, after which the discussion is opened to the floor. After each session, the Society serves a light buffet supper.

February

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar “The Other Essential Job of War”: Jewish American Merchants and the European Refugee Crisis, 1933-1945 23 February 2016.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Niki C. Lefebvre, Boston University Comment: Hasia Diner, New York University Following the rise of Adolf Hitler, political and trade conditions in the United States prevented ...

Following the rise of Adolf Hitler, political and trade conditions in the United States prevented department stores from collaborating in an effective boycott against German imports. However, individuals did undertake personal campaigns to bring Jewish refugees out of Europe. Drawing on their networks abroad and influence in Washington, a handful of Jewish American merchants in the northeast took great personal risks to pursue what Ira Hirschman called the “other essential job of war”: saving people.

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar “The Other Essential Job of War”: Jewish American Merchants and the European Refugee Crisis, 1933-1945 Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required. 23 February 2016.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Niki C. Lefebvre, Boston University Comment: Hasia Diner, New York University

Following the rise of Adolf Hitler, political and trade conditions in the United States prevented department stores from collaborating in an effective boycott against German imports. However, individuals did undertake personal campaigns to bring Jewish refugees out of Europe. Drawing on their networks abroad and influence in Washington, a handful of Jewish American merchants in the northeast took great personal risks to pursue what Ira Hirschman called the “other essential job of war”: saving people.

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