Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar provides a forum for local scholars as well as members of the general public to discuss all aspects of North American history and culture from the first English colonization to the early republic. Programs are not confined to Massachusetts topics, and most focus on works in progress.


Most seminar meetings revolve around the discussion of a pre-circulated paper. Sessions open with remarks from the essayist and an assigned commentator, after which the discussion is opened to the floor. Each session is followed by a reception with light refreshments.



Attendance is free and open to everyone. Subscribers who remit $25 for the year will receive early online access to any pre-circulated materials. Subscriptions also underwrite the cost of the series. Pre-circulated materials will be available to non-subscribers who have RSVP’d for a session on the day prior to the program. Subscribe to this seminar series and you will receive access to the seminar papers for SIX series: the Boston Seminar on African American History, the Boston Area Seminar on Early American History, the Boston Seminar on Environmental History, the Boston Seminar on the History of Women, Gender, & Sexuality, the Boston Seminar on Modern American Society and Culture, and our new Seminar on Digital History. We recognize that topics frequently resonate across these four fields; now, mix and match the seminars that you attend!

 

Join the mailing list today by emailing seminars@masshist.org.

 

Join us for an in-depth exploration of the latest scholarship. Subscribe

September 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar “The Horrid Deeds of our Enemies” 22 September 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Lauren Duval, University of Oklahoma Comment: Carolyn Eastman, Virginia Commonwealth University The American Revolution was waged not only on the battlefield, but in the realm of culture. American ...

The American Revolution was waged not only on the battlefield, but in the realm of culture. American homes and the wartime violence within them—particularly directed against women—were prominent subjects in novels and historical paintings. Reimagining women’s interactions with British soldiers solely as relationships of violence and deception, not volition, these narratives promoted a gendered vision of wartime domestic invasion and violation that would, in memory, come to define the war’s devastation and contribute to emergent ideas about the meaning of independence.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
October 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar “Our Turn Next”: Slavery and Freedom on French and American Stages, 1789-99 6 October 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Heather S. Nathans, Tufts University Comment: Jeffrey Ravel, MIT As the French abolitionist movement gathered momentum alongside the Revolution, Parisians could have ...

As the French abolitionist movement gathered momentum alongside the Revolution, Parisians could have seen hundreds of theatrical performances on themes related to race and slavery.  By contrast, the American stage grappled with the choice to perpetuate a slave system within a democracy.  Some performances hinted at slavery’s cruelty, some depicted newly-freed black characters living happily alongside whites, and others proposed returning blacks to the continent as the solution for a dilemma Thomas Jefferson described as holding “a wolf by the ears.”  This paper explores the black revolutionary figure on the U.S. and French stages during the last decade of the eighteenth century, as both nations struggled to put their principles of universal freedom into practice.  

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
December 2020
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar Caribbean Connections – Panel Discussion 1 December 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Charlotte Carrington-Farmer, Roger Williams University; Casey Schmitt, Cornell University Comment: Ryan Quintana, Wellesley College This panel brings together the work of two historians investigating the Caribbean. Casey ...

This panel brings together the work of two historians investigating the Caribbean. Casey Schmitt’s paper explores the intersection of warfare and human trafficking in the 17th century. Unmet demand for enslaved labor in smaller markets coupled with near-constant warfare among major European powers in the region reinforced practices of raiding and captivity. Schmitt’s paper shows how the lure of seizing captives facilitated manning expeditions during wartime, and demonstrates the centrality of violence against enslaved communities to 17th-century warfare. Carrington-Farmer’s paper explores how 18th century New Englanders diversified their thriving equine breeding and exportation business in an effort to meet an increasing demand for mules in the West Indies. Whilst New England's foray into mule breeding never reached the success of its horse enterprises, the lengths that farmers and merchants went to start a breeding program demonstrates how wider Atlantic markets drove New England’s economy.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
March 2021
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EAHS_banner.jpg Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar Health, Disease, and Early American Environments - A Panel Discussion 2 March 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Authors: Molly Nebiolo, Northeastern University; Camden Elliott, Harvard University Comment: Thomas Wickman, Trinity College This panel discussion brings together the histories of health, disease, and the environment to cast ...

This panel discussion brings together the histories of health, disease, and the environment to cast new light on key sites of Colonial American history. Molly Nebiolo’s research highlights how health and medical knowledge impacted the creation of early Atlantic cities. By examining the colonial history of promotional narratives, both written and spatial, her paper argues that health and well-being were fundamental ideas for the settlement of Philadelphia and Charleston. Camden Elliott’s paper recasts the history of the Stono Slave Rebellion through the lens of environmental history. Placing mosquitoes (and their pathogens) in a supporting role to a slave war in South Carolina, he investigates how yellow fever helped set the stage for resistance and malaria shielded maroons in the rebellion’s aftermath.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EAHS_banner.jpg Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar Women of the Underground: Political Repression, Kinship Networks, and the Transatlantic Resistance to Restoration Politics 16 March 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Cynthia Van Zandt, University of New Hampshire Adrian Weimer, Providence College Non-conformist resistance to the Stuart Restoration is often told as the history of ministers, ...

Non-conformist resistance to the Stuart Restoration is often told as the history of ministers, regicides, and other men who actively preserved their loyalty to political and religious ideals of the 1640s and 1650s. However, many of the ongoing activities necessary to preserve the movement were carried out by women. This paper explores women’s roles in the transatlantic kinship, religious, and veterans’ networks which enabled nonconformists to sustain themselves in the face of defeat and repression.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
May 2021
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EAHS_banner.jpg Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar Honoring Bernard Bailyn: A Master Historian, An Inspiring Teacher 4 May 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. with Mary Bilder, Boston College; Alison Games, Georgetown University; Jonathan Gienapp at Stanford University Moderator: Richard D. Brown, University of Connecticut This seminar honors the legacy and career of noted Harvard historian and MHS Life Trustee Bernard ...

This seminar honors the legacy and career of noted Harvard historian and MHS Life Trustee Bernard Bailyn. In his lengthy career, Prof. Bailyn explored and wrote about various areas in Early American history. Three leading historians will discuss Bailyn's influence on their respective sub-fields and on their own scholarship in this tribute to a master scholar and teacher.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

More
Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar “The Horrid Deeds of our Enemies” 22 September 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Lauren Duval, University of Oklahoma Comment: Carolyn Eastman, Virginia Commonwealth University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg

The American Revolution was waged not only on the battlefield, but in the realm of culture. American homes and the wartime violence within them—particularly directed against women—were prominent subjects in novels and historical paintings. Reimagining women’s interactions with British soldiers solely as relationships of violence and deception, not volition, these narratives promoted a gendered vision of wartime domestic invasion and violation that would, in memory, come to define the war’s devastation and contribute to emergent ideas about the meaning of independence.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar “Our Turn Next”: Slavery and Freedom on French and American Stages, 1789-99 6 October 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Heather S. Nathans, Tufts University Comment: Jeffrey Ravel, MIT Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg

As the French abolitionist movement gathered momentum alongside the Revolution, Parisians could have seen hundreds of theatrical performances on themes related to race and slavery.  By contrast, the American stage grappled with the choice to perpetuate a slave system within a democracy.  Some performances hinted at slavery’s cruelty, some depicted newly-freed black characters living happily alongside whites, and others proposed returning blacks to the continent as the solution for a dilemma Thomas Jefferson described as holding “a wolf by the ears.”  This paper explores the black revolutionary figure on the U.S. and French stages during the last decade of the eighteenth century, as both nations struggled to put their principles of universal freedom into practice.  

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar Caribbean Connections – Panel Discussion 1 December 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online program Charlotte Carrington-Farmer, Roger Williams University; Casey Schmitt, Cornell University Comment: Ryan Quintana, Wellesley College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg

This panel brings together the work of two historians investigating the Caribbean. Casey Schmitt’s paper explores the intersection of warfare and human trafficking in the 17th century. Unmet demand for enslaved labor in smaller markets coupled with near-constant warfare among major European powers in the region reinforced practices of raiding and captivity. Schmitt’s paper shows how the lure of seizing captives facilitated manning expeditions during wartime, and demonstrates the centrality of violence against enslaved communities to 17th-century warfare. Carrington-Farmer’s paper explores how 18th century New Englanders diversified their thriving equine breeding and exportation business in an effort to meet an increasing demand for mules in the West Indies. Whilst New England's foray into mule breeding never reached the success of its horse enterprises, the lengths that farmers and merchants went to start a breeding program demonstrates how wider Atlantic markets drove New England’s economy.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar Health, Disease, and Early American Environments - A Panel Discussion 2 March 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Authors: Molly Nebiolo, Northeastern University; Camden Elliott, Harvard University Comment: Thomas Wickman, Trinity College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EAHS_banner.jpg

This panel discussion brings together the histories of health, disease, and the environment to cast new light on key sites of Colonial American history. Molly Nebiolo’s research highlights how health and medical knowledge impacted the creation of early Atlantic cities. By examining the colonial history of promotional narratives, both written and spatial, her paper argues that health and well-being were fundamental ideas for the settlement of Philadelphia and Charleston. Camden Elliott’s paper recasts the history of the Stono Slave Rebellion through the lens of environmental history. Placing mosquitoes (and their pathogens) in a supporting role to a slave war in South Carolina, he investigates how yellow fever helped set the stage for resistance and malaria shielded maroons in the rebellion’s aftermath.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar Women of the Underground: Political Repression, Kinship Networks, and the Transatlantic Resistance to Restoration Politics 16 March 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. Cynthia Van Zandt, University of New Hampshire Adrian Weimer, Providence College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EAHS_banner.jpg

Non-conformist resistance to the Stuart Restoration is often told as the history of ministers, regicides, and other men who actively preserved their loyalty to political and religious ideals of the 1640s and 1650s. However, many of the ongoing activities necessary to preserve the movement were carried out by women. This paper explores women’s roles in the transatlantic kinship, religious, and veterans’ networks which enabled nonconformists to sustain themselves in the face of defeat and repression.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close

Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar Honoring Bernard Bailyn: A Master Historian, An Inspiring Teacher Register registration required at no cost 4 May 2021.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 6:30PM This is an online event. with Mary Bilder, Boston College; Alison Games, Georgetown University; Jonathan Gienapp at Stanford University Moderator: Richard D. Brown, University of Connecticut Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminars_2020-21/EAHS_banner.jpg

This seminar honors the legacy and career of noted Harvard historian and MHS Life Trustee Bernard Bailyn. In his lengthy career, Prof. Bailyn explored and wrote about various areas in Early American history. Three leading historians will discuss Bailyn's influence on their respective sub-fields and on their own scholarship in this tribute to a master scholar and teacher.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

close