January 2020
Building Closed New Year's Day 1 January 2020.Wednesday, all day The Society is CLOSED.

The Society is CLOSED.

More
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 4 January 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar Supplying Slavery: Jamaica and British Imperial Trade, 1752-1769 7 January 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Peter Pellizzari, Harvard University Comment: Richard Dunn, American Philosophical Society Historians have long understood the economic importance of Jamaica to the eighteenth-century British ...

Historians have long understood the economic importance of Jamaica to the eighteenth-century British empire, but the vast profits that the island's sugar-slave complexes produced could only have existed with the supplies and provisions provided by mainland colonists in North America. Newly collected data from nearly 10,000 British naval office shipping lists for Kingston, Jamaica provide a re-assessment of the size, nature, and value of this trade. The shipping lists reveal not only how deeply committed the mainland was to supplying Jamaican slavery, but also suggests that we reconsider the island as a powerful regional hub within the larger British Atlantic economy, one in which North America figured as an important hinterland.

More
Brown Bag “Thus Much for Politicks”: American Women, Diplomacy, and the Aftermath of the American Revolution 8 January 2020.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Miriam Liebman, City University of New York This talk looks at the ways women used non-republican methods of politicking on behalf of the United ...

This talk looks at the ways women used non-republican methods of politicking on behalf of the United States while abroad in Europe, focusing on Abigail Adams’s time abroad in London and Paris. Situating Adams in an international and diplomatic context highlights the ways she influenced American foreign and domestic policy while abroad. Using five different themes— letters, politics and political intrigue, money and economic diplomacy, social networks, and republicanism and aristocracy abroad— this work analyzes her politicking in Europe.

More
Life and Legacy pop-up exhibition Exhibitionends Abigail Adams: Life & Legacy 10 January 2020.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Abigail Adams urged her husband to “Remember the Ladies” and made herself impossible to ...

Abigail Adams urged her husband to “Remember the Ladies” and made herself impossible to forget. But Abigail is memorable for more than her famous 1776 admonition. This final Remember Abigail display uses documents and artifacts through the ages to consider the way Abigail viewed her own legacy and to explore how and why we continue to Remember Abigail.

Gallery talks will take place on 25 October and 22 November at 2:00 PM.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/0067bloodymassacre_lg.jpg Public Program, MHS Tour FIRE! Voices of the Boston Massacre Gallery Talk 10 January 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Peter Drummey, the Stephen T. Riley Librarian at MHS Peter Drummey, the Stephen T. Riley Librarian at MHS, will walk visitors through our exhibition of ...

Peter Drummey, the Stephen T. Riley Librarian at MHS, will walk visitors through our exhibition of the Boston Massacre, which explores and interprets the events of March 5, 1770. He will highlight some of the archival material found in the MHS collection.

More
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 11 January 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/ehs_banner.jpg Environmental History Seminar “Wealth and Beauty in Trees”: State Forestry and the Rehabilitation of Massachusetts’s Economy, Landscape, and Culture, 1898-1919 14 January 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Aaron Ahlstrom, Boston University Comment: Brian Donahue, Brandeis University Massachusetts currently stewards 311,000 acres of state forests and parks. This public land system ...

Massachusetts currently stewards 311,000 acres of state forests and parks. This public land system originated in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century efforts to strengthen the Commonwealth’s economy, rehabilitate its unproductive landscapes, and revitalize its rural communities through scientific forestry. This paper offers new perspectives on Progressive Era conservation by analyzing how state foresters sought to improve rural landscapes’ profitability and aesthetics by educating private woodlot owners, suppressing forest fires and pests, and reforesting newly-acquired public lands.

More
Brown Bag Career Activists: Women’s Organization and Social Reform in New England, 1830-1890 15 January 2020.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kathryn Angelica, University of Connecticut This talk looks at the evolution of women’s organizations throughout the nineteenth century in ...

This talk looks at the evolution of women’s organizations throughout the nineteenth century in New England, focusing on “career activists.” These women negotiated between public and private spheres while leading lives defined by their activism. The project examines the political implications of social reform and questions both the narrative of the two-dimensional benevolent woman and that of sporadic, passion-fueled benevolence. 

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/2020_programs/History_At_Play-Vincent_Morreale_Photography-2.jpg Public Program Deborah Sampson: A Revolution of Her Own! 15 January 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Judith Kalaora, founder of History at Play There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders and Boston Public School students). Deborah Sampson was the first woman to fight in and be honorably discharged from the American ...

Deborah Sampson was the first woman to fight in and be honorably discharged from the American Military. An indentured servant by age five, Sampson grew up in a man’s world, where women were naught but second-class citizens. As a self-educated master-less woman, she felt a higher calling, and in the final years of the American Revolution, Sampson bound her chest, tied back her hair, and enlisted in the 4th Massachusetts Regiment of the Continental Army, as “Robert Shurtlieff.” Judith Kalaora reimagines Sampson’s remarkable story through living history performance.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/banner_draft_2.jpg African American History Seminar “Increasing her Stock”: Two Harriets and the Louisiana Borderlands 16 January 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Rashauna Johnson, Dartmouth College Comment: Jen Manion, Amherst College This paper uses the sexual biographies of two enslaved women, both named Harriet, in Louisiana&rsquo ...

This paper uses the sexual biographies of two enslaved women, both named Harriet, in Louisiana’s Florida Parishes to explore the workings of intimacy and empire in the plantation South during its transition from borderlands to hub of King Cotton.

More
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 18 January 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

More
Building Closed Martin Luther King Jr. Day 20 January 2020.Monday, all day The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/wgs_banner.jpg History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar "For I'd Rather Be Dead Than Not to Dream of a Better World": Mae Gadpaille's Vision of the Montessori Family Centre Community 21 January 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Mary McNeil, Harvard University Comment: Ashley Farmer, University of Texas – Austin In 1967, Mae Gadpaille, the director of a black Montessori preschool in Roxbury, faced displacement; ...

In 1967, Mae Gadpaille, the director of a black Montessori preschool in Roxbury, faced displacement; the church that housed her school was slated to be cleared for an urban renewal project. In response, Gadpaille launched a campaign to build the Montessori Family Centre Community, a living community for approximately 150 families with a PreK-12 Montessori school in the center. This talk traces Gadpaille's efforts to realize her vision, paying special attention to how she thought Montessori methods could help advance a black nationalist project of self-determination, while also considering the limitations of such a vision – namely, who could "belong" to this community and who might be left at the margins.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Hall_The_Puritans_cropped.jpg Author Talk, Public Program The Puritans: A Transatlantic History 22 January 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. David Hall, Harvard University Registration for this program is now closed. David Hall presents a sweeping transatlantic history of Puritanism from its emergence out of the ...

David Hall presents a sweeping transatlantic history of Puritanism from its emergence out of the religious tumult of Elizabethan England to its founding role in the story of America. Shedding new light on the diverse forms of Puritan belief and practice in England, Scotland, and New England, Hall provides a multifaceted account of a cultural movement that judged the Protestant reforms of Elizabeth’s reign to be unfinished. Hall describes the movement’s deeply ambiguous triumph under Oliver Cromwell, its political demise with the Restoration of the English monarchy in 1660, and its perilous migration across the Atlantic to establish a “perfect reformation” in the New World.

 

 

 

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Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/deloria.jpg Biography Seminar The Art of Family History: Visual Imagery, Family Narrative and Native American Modernism 23 January 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Phil Deloria in conversation with Julie Dobrow Registration is now closed. Decades ago, historian Philip Deloria (Harvard University) found some drawings in the basement. ...

Decades ago, historian Philip Deloria (Harvard University) found some drawings in the basement. These distinctive prints turned out to be the iconic work of his great aunt. Deloria will speak about his new book, Becoming Mary Sully: Toward an American Indian Aesthetic with Julie Dobrow (Tufts University), author of After Emily: Two Remarkable Women and the Legacy of America’s Greatest Poet. The event will focus on how an intensely personal story interweaves Sully’s life and works with the “richness of their historical situation” in Native studies and art history.

More
MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 25 January 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Animal_city_cropped.jpg Public Program, Author Talk Animal City: The Domestication of America 27 January 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Andrew A. Robichaud, Boston University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). American cities were once full of animal life: cattle driven through city streets; pigs feeding on ...

American cities were once full of animal life: cattle driven through city streets; pigs feeding on trash in public alleys and basements; cows crammed into urban feedlots; horses worked to death in the harness; dogs pulling carts and powering small machines; and wild animals peering out at human spectators from behind bars. In his new book, Andrew Robichaud reconstructs this evolving world of nineteenth-century urban animal life—from San Francisco to Boston to New York—and reveals its importance, both then and now.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/masc_banner.jpg Modern American Society and Culture Seminar Genetown: The Urbanization of the Boston Area Biotechnology Industry Registration is now closed. 28 January 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Robin Wolfe Scheffler, MIT Comment: Lizbeth Cohen, Harvard University Today, the Boston area hosts the densest cluster of biotechnology firms anywhere in the world. Yet ...

Today, the Boston area hosts the densest cluster of biotechnology firms anywhere in the world. Yet in the 1980s, the rapid concentration of the industry within Boston’s urban neighborhoods was a striking contrast to the suburbanization of high technology research and development a generation before. This remarkable urbanization represented the confluence of the labor and financial challenges faced by biotechnology start-ups with decisions regarding municipal governance and redevelopment in the aftermath of deindustrialization.

More
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/thumbnail_GTTP_NationsFounders_640x3602.jpg Public Program, Conversation Historical Perspectives on Today’s World: Our Nation's Founders and Today's Political Challenges 30 January 2020.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This program will be held at the Edward M. Kennedy Institute Stephen Fried; Liz Covart; Sara Georgini, MHS; Nathaniel Sheidley, Revolutionary Spaces and moderator Fred Thys, WBUR Please follow the ticketing link below to register for this program. Our Founding Fathers were progressive for their time in establishing a new nation. Many of them ...

Our Founding Fathers were progressive for their time in establishing a new nation. Many of them grappled with the same issues that we face today, including political polarization, voicing new ideas, and approaches to health care. Stephen Fried, author of Rush: Revolution, Madness & the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father, will explore the life and legacy of Benjamin Rush – one of the least known Founding Fathers. He will be joined by additional historians in a conversation of how many of our nation’s founders persevered during this time – and the lessons that we can learn by reflecting on our past.

To register for this program please visit: https://www.eventbrite.com

This program will be held at the Edward M. Kennedy Institute (210 Morrissey Blvd, Boston, MA 02125)

More
Building Closed New Year's Day 1 January 2020.Wednesday, all day

The Society is CLOSED.

close

MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 4 January 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

close

Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar Supplying Slavery: Jamaica and British Imperial Trade, 1752-1769 7 January 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Peter Pellizzari, Harvard University Comment: Richard Dunn, American Philosophical Society Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/eahs_banner.jpg

Historians have long understood the economic importance of Jamaica to the eighteenth-century British empire, but the vast profits that the island's sugar-slave complexes produced could only have existed with the supplies and provisions provided by mainland colonists in North America. Newly collected data from nearly 10,000 British naval office shipping lists for Kingston, Jamaica provide a re-assessment of the size, nature, and value of this trade. The shipping lists reveal not only how deeply committed the mainland was to supplying Jamaican slavery, but also suggests that we reconsider the island as a powerful regional hub within the larger British Atlantic economy, one in which North America figured as an important hinterland.

close

Brown Bag “Thus Much for Politicks”: American Women, Diplomacy, and the Aftermath of the American Revolution 8 January 2020.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Miriam Liebman, City University of New York

This talk looks at the ways women used non-republican methods of politicking on behalf of the United States while abroad in Europe, focusing on Abigail Adams’s time abroad in London and Paris. Situating Adams in an international and diplomatic context highlights the ways she influenced American foreign and domestic policy while abroad. Using five different themes— letters, politics and political intrigue, money and economic diplomacy, social networks, and republicanism and aristocracy abroad— this work analyzes her politicking in Europe.

close

Exhibition Abigail Adams: Life & Legacy Life and Legacy pop-up exhibition

Abigail Adams urged her husband to “Remember the Ladies” and made herself impossible to forget. But Abigail is memorable for more than her famous 1776 admonition. This final Remember Abigail display uses documents and artifacts through the ages to consider the way Abigail viewed her own legacy and to explore how and why we continue to Remember Abigail.

Gallery talks will take place on 25 October and 22 November at 2:00 PM.

close

Public Program, MHS Tour FIRE! Voices of the Boston Massacre Gallery Talk 10 January 2020.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Peter Drummey, the Stephen T. Riley Librarian at MHS Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/0067bloodymassacre_lg.jpg

Peter Drummey, the Stephen T. Riley Librarian at MHS, will walk visitors through our exhibition of the Boston Massacre, which explores and interprets the events of March 5, 1770. He will highlight some of the archival material found in the MHS collection.

close

MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 11 January 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

close

Environmental History Seminar “Wealth and Beauty in Trees”: State Forestry and the Rehabilitation of Massachusetts’s Economy, Landscape, and Culture, 1898-1919 14 January 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Aaron Ahlstrom, Boston University Comment: Brian Donahue, Brandeis University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/ehs_banner.jpg

Massachusetts currently stewards 311,000 acres of state forests and parks. This public land system originated in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century efforts to strengthen the Commonwealth’s economy, rehabilitate its unproductive landscapes, and revitalize its rural communities through scientific forestry. This paper offers new perspectives on Progressive Era conservation by analyzing how state foresters sought to improve rural landscapes’ profitability and aesthetics by educating private woodlot owners, suppressing forest fires and pests, and reforesting newly-acquired public lands.

close

Brown Bag Career Activists: Women’s Organization and Social Reform in New England, 1830-1890 15 January 2020.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kathryn Angelica, University of Connecticut

This talk looks at the evolution of women’s organizations throughout the nineteenth century in New England, focusing on “career activists.” These women negotiated between public and private spheres while leading lives defined by their activism. The project examines the political implications of social reform and questions both the narrative of the two-dimensional benevolent woman and that of sporadic, passion-fueled benevolence. 

close

Public Program Deborah Sampson: A Revolution of Her Own! 15 January 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Judith Kalaora, founder of History at Play There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders and Boston Public School students). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/2020_programs/History_At_Play-Vincent_Morreale_Photography-2.jpg

Deborah Sampson was the first woman to fight in and be honorably discharged from the American Military. An indentured servant by age five, Sampson grew up in a man’s world, where women were naught but second-class citizens. As a self-educated master-less woman, she felt a higher calling, and in the final years of the American Revolution, Sampson bound her chest, tied back her hair, and enlisted in the 4th Massachusetts Regiment of the Continental Army, as “Robert Shurtlieff.” Judith Kalaora reimagines Sampson’s remarkable story through living history performance.

close

African American History Seminar “Increasing her Stock”: Two Harriets and the Louisiana Borderlands 16 January 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Rashauna Johnson, Dartmouth College Comment: Jen Manion, Amherst College Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/banner_draft_2.jpg

This paper uses the sexual biographies of two enslaved women, both named Harriet, in Louisiana’s Florida Parishes to explore the workings of intimacy and empire in the plantation South during its transition from borderlands to hub of King Cotton.

close

MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 18 January 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

close

Building Closed Martin Luther King Jr. Day 20 January 2020.Monday, all day

The MHS is CLOSED in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

close

History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Seminar "For I'd Rather Be Dead Than Not to Dream of a Better World": Mae Gadpaille's Vision of the Montessori Family Centre Community 21 January 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Mary McNeil, Harvard University Comment: Ashley Farmer, University of Texas – Austin Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/wgs_banner.jpg

In 1967, Mae Gadpaille, the director of a black Montessori preschool in Roxbury, faced displacement; the church that housed her school was slated to be cleared for an urban renewal project. In response, Gadpaille launched a campaign to build the Montessori Family Centre Community, a living community for approximately 150 families with a PreK-12 Montessori school in the center. This talk traces Gadpaille's efforts to realize her vision, paying special attention to how she thought Montessori methods could help advance a black nationalist project of self-determination, while also considering the limitations of such a vision – namely, who could "belong" to this community and who might be left at the margins.

close

Author Talk, Public Program The Puritans: A Transatlantic History 22 January 2020.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. David Hall, Harvard University Registration for this program is now closed. Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Hall_The_Puritans_cropped.jpg

David Hall presents a sweeping transatlantic history of Puritanism from its emergence out of the religious tumult of Elizabethan England to its founding role in the story of America. Shedding new light on the diverse forms of Puritan belief and practice in England, Scotland, and New England, Hall provides a multifaceted account of a cultural movement that judged the Protestant reforms of Elizabeth’s reign to be unfinished. Hall describes the movement’s deeply ambiguous triumph under Oliver Cromwell, its political demise with the Restoration of the English monarchy in 1660, and its perilous migration across the Atlantic to establish a “perfect reformation” in the New World.

 

 

 

close

Biography Seminar The Art of Family History: Visual Imagery, Family Narrative and Native American Modernism 23 January 2020.Thursday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Phil Deloria in conversation with Julie Dobrow Registration is now closed. Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/deloria.jpg

Decades ago, historian Philip Deloria (Harvard University) found some drawings in the basement. These distinctive prints turned out to be the iconic work of his great aunt. Deloria will speak about his new book, Becoming Mary Sully: Toward an American Indian Aesthetic with Julie Dobrow (Tufts University), author of After Emily: Two Remarkable Women and the Legacy of America’s Greatest Poet. The event will focus on how an intensely personal story interweaves Sully’s life and works with the “richness of their historical situation” in Native studies and art history.

close

MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 25 January 2020.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

close

Public Program, Author Talk Animal City: The Domestication of America 27 January 2020.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30. Andrew A. Robichaud, Boston University There is a $10 per person fee (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members, EBT or ConnectorCare cardholders). Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/Animal_city_cropped.jpg

American cities were once full of animal life: cattle driven through city streets; pigs feeding on trash in public alleys and basements; cows crammed into urban feedlots; horses worked to death in the harness; dogs pulling carts and powering small machines; and wild animals peering out at human spectators from behind bars. In his new book, Andrew Robichaud reconstructs this evolving world of nineteenth-century urban animal life—from San Francisco to Boston to New York—and reveals its importance, both then and now.

close

Modern American Society and Culture Seminar Genetown: The Urbanization of the Boston Area Biotechnology Industry Registration is now closed. 28 January 2020.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Robin Wolfe Scheffler, MIT Comment: Lizbeth Cohen, Harvard University Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Seminar_2019-2020/masc_banner.jpg

Today, the Boston area hosts the densest cluster of biotechnology firms anywhere in the world. Yet in the 1980s, the rapid concentration of the industry within Boston’s urban neighborhoods was a striking contrast to the suburbanization of high technology research and development a generation before. This remarkable urbanization represented the confluence of the labor and financial challenges faced by biotechnology start-ups with decisions regarding municipal governance and redevelopment in the aftermath of deindustrialization.

close

Public Program, Conversation Historical Perspectives on Today’s World: Our Nation's Founders and Today's Political Challenges 30 January 2020.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM This program will be held at the Edward M. Kennedy Institute Stephen Fried; Liz Covart; Sara Georgini, MHS; Nathaniel Sheidley, Revolutionary Spaces and moderator Fred Thys, WBUR Please follow the ticketing link below to register for this program. Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/Winter_2020/thumbnail_GTTP_NationsFounders_640x3602.jpg

Our Founding Fathers were progressive for their time in establishing a new nation. Many of them grappled with the same issues that we face today, including political polarization, voicing new ideas, and approaches to health care. Stephen Fried, author of Rush: Revolution, Madness & the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father, will explore the life and legacy of Benjamin Rush – one of the least known Founding Fathers. He will be joined by additional historians in a conversation of how many of our nation’s founders persevered during this time – and the lessons that we can learn by reflecting on our past.

To register for this program please visit: https://www.eventbrite.com

This program will be held at the Edward M. Kennedy Institute (210 Morrissey Blvd, Boston, MA 02125)

close


    Key to event colors:
  • MHS Tours
  • Seminars
  • Public Programs
  • Brown Bags
  • Special Events