Planned Gifts and Bequests

There are a number of planned giving options that can help you realize your own philanthropic goals while ensuring the future financial stability of the Massachusetts Historical Society. The benefits of making a planned gift may range from a steady stream of life income to a charitable income tax deduction and lower capital gains, estate, and other taxes.

Bequests

A bequest is a gift made through a will or trust and is an easy, practical way to make a meaningful financial contribution to the Society without affecting your current finances. A bequest may be made for a specific dollar amount or piece of property, for a percentage of your estate, or for part or all of what remains of the estate after other bequests are carried out.

Charitable Gift Annuity

Establishing a gift annuity with the MHS is a way to receive income for life as well as potential tax benefits—such as a federal income tax charitable deduction, annuity payments which are partially tax-free, and future estate tax savings—while supporting the Society's mission. 

Other Planned Giving Assets and Vehicles

The MHS offers a wide range of planned giving options —charitable remainder trusts, chartiable lead trusts, gifts of real estate or tangible personal property, and gifts from retirement plans or life insurance policies—that can be tailored to your needs and interests. For more information on how to make a planned gift to the MHS or to inform us of your existing plans that name the Society as a beneficiary, please contact the Development department at 617-646-0543 or development@masshist.org. Please note that the information above is not intended as legal advice, and you should consult with your attorney before making a planned gift.

James Sullivan Society

Since its founding in 1791, the MHS has benefited from a tradition of giving in Boston and beyond. The James Sullivan Society honors this legacy by recognizing those who have included the MHS in their long-term plans through bequests, life-income gifts, or other deferred-giving arrangements. 

The Hon. James Sullivan had the distinction of being the Society’s founding president, first recorded donor, and early legator through a generous bequest of important historical documents and artifacts. In addition to his service to the MHS, Sullivan was one of the first justices appointed to the Superior Court of Judicature and a governor of Massachusetts.

Members of the Sullivan Society continue the tradition of giving by naming the MHS as a beneficiary in their estate plans. Their gifts help the Society preserve our history for the scholars of tomorrow. In return, they are invited to special events and recognized in the Society’s Annual Report. To learn more about the Sullivan Society or to inform us that you have included the MHS in your estate plans, please contact the Development department at 617-646-0543 or development@masshist.org.

Upcoming Events

Environmental History Seminar

The Fight before the Flood: Rural Protest and the Debate over Boston’s Quabbin Reservoir, 1919 ...

16Jan 5:15PM 2018

In 1919, state engineers proposed solving Boston’s water supply crisis by damming the Swift River, flooding a western Massachusetts valley and evicting 2,500 ...

Brown Bag

Skulls, Selves, and Showmanship: Itinerant Phrenologists in 19th-Century America

17Jan 12:00PM 2018

"Come, then, one and all, and learn to know yourselves." With these words, a traveling phrenologist advertised his lecture to the public. Proponents of phrenology ...

Author Talk

Pauline Maier Memorial Lecture - Madison’s Hand: Revising the Constitutional Convention

17Jan 6:00PM 2018
There will be a pre-talk reception at 5:30pm.

James Madison’s Notes on the 1787 Constitutional Convention have acquired nearly unquestioned authority as the description of the U.S. Constitution’s creation ...

From our Blog

This Week @ MHS

First things first in this weekly round-up: The Society is CLOSED on Monday, 15 January, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr., Day. Normal hours resume on Tuesday, 16 January. Now that we have ...

A Midwinter’s Tale

  At eight o-clock on a January morning in 1891, and a world away from the ice-caked streets of his native New England, 52-year-old Henry Adams leisurely began to go about his day. Armed with ...

Read more from our blog

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