Membership

The Massachusetts Historical Society has two membership categories—Fellows and Members. Both groups are important to the life of the Society. Fellows and Members help support the Society's mission and receive benefits such as a subscription to our annual journal, the Massachusetts Historical Review, and invitations to special events.

Members

Membership at the MHS is open to all with an interest in American history. The Society welcomes Members from near and far to join its community of history lovers. The MHS offers a handful of different membership categories aimed to encourage participation in its various activities. Learn how to become a Member or renew your membership now.

Fellows

Election as a Fellow of the MHS is an honor bestowed by the Society on distinguished scholars and civic leaders. The Fellows are the legal governing body of the MHS, and therefore have the privilege of shaping the Society. Learn more about the MHS Fellows or renew your Fellow dues.



Join Us at an Upcoming Program

Cogswell snow scene Member Event, Special Event MHS Fellows and Members Holiday Party 3 December 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM Please RSVP   This event is open only to MHS Fellows and Members. MHS Fellows and Members are invited to celebrate the season at the Society’s annual ...

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to celebrate the season at the Society’s annual holiday party. Enjoy festive music, holiday cheer, and the annual tradition of reading the anti-Christmas laws.

Become a Member today!

details
Public Program Making History: King Philip's War in Documents & Artifacts 8 December 2014.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Facilitator: Bruce J. Schulman, Boston University Students of the Boston University course "Making History" discuss the MHS exhibit on King Philip's ...

Students of the Boston University course "Making History" discuss the MHS exhibit on King Philip's War they have researched and compiled. The semester-long project on the bloody conflict between English colonists and Native Americans includes work on letters and diaries, sermons, early printed books, and objects from the war.

Bruce J. Schulman is the William E. Huntington Professor and Chair of the History Department at Boston University. His teaching and research concentrate on the history of the modern United States, particularly on the relationships between politics and broader cultural change. Schulman is currently at work on a volume for the Oxford History of the United States covering the years 1896-1929. He lives with his family in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Image: Bowl attributed to the Wampanoag. Elm burl, 1655-1675. Massachusetts Historical Society .

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Public Program Race to the Top of the World: Richard Byrd & the First Flight to the North Pole 11 December 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Sheldon Bart One hundred years ago—then as now—the eyes of the industrialized world were on the ...

Race to the Top of the World book coverOne hundred years ago—then as now—the eyes of the industrialized world were on the Arctic. It was widely held in this era that a new, uncharted continent would be found in the Arctic Ocean. Scientific treatises “proved” its existence. As aviation developed, the mythical land became endowed with commercial value and strategic importance. This was the context in which Richard Byrd (1888-1957) emerged as an explorer—an international quest for a mythic grail. His rivals included Roald Amundsen, Lincoln Ellsworth, and Hubert Wilkins.

The Arctic was considered as remote as outer space in the 1920s, and aerial exploits north of the Arctic Circle attracted a tremendous amount of attention. The New York Times called the race “the greatest story of the year.” The sensationalism, however, has never ended. Byrd’s flight to the North Pole has been bitterly disputed for the better part of a century, and almost every part of his early life and career has become controversial. Author Sheldon Bart offers compelling new evidence and new revelations to substantiate his thesis that the controversies still swirling around Admiral Byrd—including the legitimacy of his flight to the North Pole—are based on incomplete research, distortion, and superficial assessment.

Writer-explorer Sheldon Bart is a member of the Board of Governors of the American Polar Society and president and founder of Wilderness Research Foundation (WRF), a not-for-profit organization seeking to create more opportunities for scientific exploration beyond the limited regime of government funding. He organized and led the 1996 American Expedition to Baffin Island in the Canadian Eastern Arctic and was project manager of the 2010 WRF Antarctic Peninsula field program. Sheldon has lectured at the National Archives, the Explorers Club, the Virginia Historical Society, the National Museum of the U.S. Navy, the Geographical Society of Philadelphia, the Elisha Kent Kane Historical Society, Hunter College of the City University of New York, and the Byrd Polar Research Center at Ohio State University. He is a senior associate at LAPA Fundraising, a consulting firm based in New York City, and has published fiction and nonfiction. He is currently working on a novel based on his own polar adventures.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

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More events
Member Event, Special Event MHS Fellows and Members Holiday Party 3 December 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost This event is open only to MHS Fellows and Members. Cogswell snow scene

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to celebrate the season at the Society’s annual holiday party. Enjoy festive music, holiday cheer, and the annual tradition of reading the anti-Christmas laws.

Become a Member today!

close
Public Program Making History: King Philip's War in Documents & Artifacts 8 December 2014.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  this event is free Facilitator: Bruce J. Schulman, Boston University

Students of the Boston University course "Making History" discuss the MHS exhibit on King Philip's War they have researched and compiled. The semester-long project on the bloody conflict between English colonists and Native Americans includes work on letters and diaries, sermons, early printed books, and objects from the war.

Bruce J. Schulman is the William E. Huntington Professor and Chair of the History Department at Boston University. His teaching and research concentrate on the history of the modern United States, particularly on the relationships between politics and broader cultural change. Schulman is currently at work on a volume for the Oxford History of the United States covering the years 1896-1929. He lives with his family in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Image: Bowl attributed to the Wampanoag. Elm burl, 1655-1675. Massachusetts Historical Society .

close
Public Program Race to the Top of the World: Richard Byrd & the First Flight to the North Pole 11 December 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Sheldon Bart

Race to the Top of the World book coverOne hundred years ago—then as now—the eyes of the industrialized world were on the Arctic. It was widely held in this era that a new, uncharted continent would be found in the Arctic Ocean. Scientific treatises “proved” its existence. As aviation developed, the mythical land became endowed with commercial value and strategic importance. This was the context in which Richard Byrd (1888-1957) emerged as an explorer—an international quest for a mythic grail. His rivals included Roald Amundsen, Lincoln Ellsworth, and Hubert Wilkins.

The Arctic was considered as remote as outer space in the 1920s, and aerial exploits north of the Arctic Circle attracted a tremendous amount of attention. The New York Times called the race “the greatest story of the year.” The sensationalism, however, has never ended. Byrd’s flight to the North Pole has been bitterly disputed for the better part of a century, and almost every part of his early life and career has become controversial. Author Sheldon Bart offers compelling new evidence and new revelations to substantiate his thesis that the controversies still swirling around Admiral Byrd—including the legitimacy of his flight to the North Pole—are based on incomplete research, distortion, and superficial assessment.

Writer-explorer Sheldon Bart is a member of the Board of Governors of the American Polar Society and president and founder of Wilderness Research Foundation (WRF), a not-for-profit organization seeking to create more opportunities for scientific exploration beyond the limited regime of government funding. He organized and led the 1996 American Expedition to Baffin Island in the Canadian Eastern Arctic and was project manager of the 2010 WRF Antarctic Peninsula field program. Sheldon has lectured at the National Archives, the Explorers Club, the Virginia Historical Society, the National Museum of the U.S. Navy, the Geographical Society of Philadelphia, the Elisha Kent Kane Historical Society, Hunter College of the City University of New York, and the Byrd Polar Research Center at Ohio State University. He is a senior associate at LAPA Fundraising, a consulting firm based in New York City, and has published fiction and nonfiction. He is currently working on a novel based on his own polar adventures.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

close

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