Membership

The Massachusetts Historical Society has two membership categories—Fellows and Members. Both groups are important to the life of the Society. Fellows and Members help support the Society's mission and receive benefits such as a subscription to our annual journal, the Massachusetts Historical Review, and invitations to special events.

Members

Membership at the MHS is open to all with an interest in American history. The Society welcomes Members from near and far to join its community of history lovers. The MHS offers a handful of different membership categories aimed to encourage participation in its various activities. Learn how to become a Member or renew your membership now.

Fellows

Election as a Fellow of the MHS is an honor bestowed by the Society on distinguished scholars and civic leaders. The Fellows are the legal governing body of the MHS, and therefore have the privilege of shaping the Society. Learn more about the MHS Fellows or renew your Fellow dues.



Join Us at an Upcoming Program

Special Event MHS Graduate Student Reception 18 September 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM All graduate students in American history and related subjects are invited to attend. Faculty ...

All graduate students in American history and related subjects are invited to attend. Faculty members in these fields are also welcome.

Begin the new academic year by meeting graduate students and faculty from other universities who are also working in your field. Enjoy refreshments, take a tour of MHS departments, and learn about the range of resources available to support your work, including MHS fellowship programs. Refreshments and networking begin at 6:00 p.m. and run throughout the evening. Program begins at 6:30 p.m.

No charge. RSVP required by September 17. Email kviens@masshist.org or phone 617-646-0568 with your name and affiliation. Indicate whether you are a graduate student or faculty member.

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Public Programbegins Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 26 September 2014.Friday, 8:30AM - 3:30PM This event will take place at the Framingham History Center. What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before ...

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation in 1776? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in Framingham and other nearby towns as the Americans attempted to create a new nation in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story. 

Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • discover what changed (or didn't change) for the inhabitants of the Framingham area as new government structures were implemented after the American Revolution.
  • discuss the concerns (both local and national) expressed by Massachusetts residents in various towns during the era of the Early Republic.
  • explore the ways in which geography, economy, and social/cultural practices influenced local concerns.
  • discover evidence of local concerns, and discussions of national policies, in primary sources held by the Framingham History Center and the Massachusetts Historical Society.
  •  explore new ways of engaging students and local communities in their history.

To Register
Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

details
Public Programends Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 27 September 2014.Saturday, 8:30AM - 3:30PM This event will take place at the Framingham History Center. What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before ...

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation in 1776? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in Framingham and other nearby towns as the Americans attempted to create a new nation in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story. 

Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • discover what changed (or didn't change) for the inhabitants of the Framingham area as new government structures were implemented after the American Revolution.
  • discuss the concerns (both local and national) expressed by Massachusetts residents in various towns during the era of the Early Republic.
  • explore the ways in which geography, economy, and social/cultural practices influenced local concerns.
  • discover evidence of local concerns, and discussions of national policies, in primary sources held by the Framingham History Center and the Massachusetts Historical Society.
  •  explore new ways of engaging students and local communities in their history.

To Register
Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

details
October
Public Program The Trials of Old New England Towns in a New Nation 1 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Mary Fuhrer, Independent Scholar We tend to think of New England towns in the first decades of the 19th century as peaceful, bucolic ...

Mary White, circa 1840. Courtesy Boylston Historical Society.We tend to think of New England towns in the first decades of the 19th century as peaceful, bucolic havens -- they were not. In this talk, Mary Babson Fuhrer will discuss the remarkable stories of conflict and transformation that reshaped local communities in the decades leading up to the Civil War. As people struggled to work out the promises of the Revolution on the personal level, contrary ideals of community identity and individual interests clashed, until, as one observer noted, "the most malignant passions of our depraved natures raged." The diaries, letters, and account books she draws on form the basis of her recent book, Crisis of Community: Trials and Transformation of a New England Town, 1815-1848.

Mary Babson Fuhrer is a public historian and independent scholar who lives in Littleton, Mass. Fuhrer provides research, interpretation, and programs for humanities associations, museums, historical societies, and educational institutions. She specializes in using primary sources to recover everyday lives from the past. Her scholarship has received generous support from the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, the Massachusetts Historical Society, the American Antiquarian Society, and the New England Regional Fellowship Consortium. Fuhrer was recently awarded the Massachusetts History Commendation for 2014 by the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities. She is currently pursuing research on the illness narratives of consumptives (tubercular patients) across gender, class, ethnicity, and race in antebellum New England.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

details
Public Program Katherine, Grace, and Mary: Archaeological Revelations of 17th and 18th Century Women from Boston's Big Dig 6 October 2014.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Joe Bagley, Boston City Archaeologist The archaeological surveys conducted prior to the beginning of Boston's infamous Big Dig resulted in ...

A mid-18th century porringer pot by Grace Parker found at the Three Cranes TavernThe archaeological surveys conducted prior to the beginning of Boston's infamous Big Dig resulted in the uncovering of mountains of historical data on Boston's deep history.  Three archaeological sites stand out for their contributions to Women's history in Boston. These include the late 17th century site of Katherine Nanny Naylor, the early 18th century site of Mary Long, and the mid-18th century site of Grace Parker.  Katherine was the first woman to legally divorce her husband in Puritan Massachusetts, Mary was the operator of the Three Cranes Tavern in Charlestown---the cultural and physical heart of the Charlestown community, and Grace owned and operated the most successful ceramic business in Boston producing wears with her distinctive brush strokes.  Together, these three women paint a complicated and nuanced history of Boston that goes far beyond what is typically known or written about women in these periods.  Join City Archaeologist Joe Bagley as he discusses the information uncovered about these three women and their contributions to the history and culture of Boston.

Joe Bagley is the City Archaeologist of Boston.  As a City employee, Joe executed archaeological surveys on city-owned land, reviewed construction and development projects that could impact archaeological sites, and promotes Boston's archaeology through public events and talks.  Joe received his BA in Archaeology from Boston University and his MA in Historical Archaeology from UMass Boston.  He has been conducting archaeological surveys in New England on historic and Native sites for over a dozen years.  He is also the live-in caretaker of the Dorchester Historical Society's William Clapp House where he lives with his wife Jen and his dog, Jack.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

http://www.cityofboston.gov/archaeology/

https://www.facebook.com/BostonArchaeologyProgram

details
Thomas Hutchinson Member Event, Special Event History Revealed: Thomas Hutchinson and the Stamp Act Riots 8 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   This event is open only to MHS Fellows and Members MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special evening at the Society as John W. Tyler, editor of ...

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special evening at the Society as John W. Tyler, editor of The Correspondence of Thomas Hutchinson: 1740-1766 (2014), relays the story of Lt. Gov. Thomas Hutchinson and how he came to be on the losing side of the American Revolution. His house was destroyed by a mob during the Stamp Act riots, a milestone in the series of acts of civil disobedience that made Boston notorious in the eyes of the British government. A pair of fire tongs salvaged from that evening and now in the collections of the MHS will be on display along with other objects related to Hutchinson and the coming of the American Revolution.

6:00 PM: Reception
6:30 PM: Remarks by John W. Tyler followed by a presentation of items from the Society's collections

Become a Member today!

details
Special Event, Public Program Opening Our Doors Open House 13 October 2014.Monday, 10:00AM - 3:00PM Join us as part of Opening Our Doors, Boston’s largest single day of free arts and cultural ...

Join us as part of Opening Our Doors, Boston’s largest single day of free arts and cultural events. Stop by to view Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in the First World War. This event is free and open to the public.

details
Public Program Rebels in Vermont!: The St. Albans Raid 15 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm J. Kevin Graffagnino, William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan On October 19, 1864, twenty-two Confederate soldiers under the command of Bennett H. Young attacked ...

Orleans County broadsideOn October 19, 1864, twenty-two Confederate soldiers under the command of Bennett H. Young attacked the village of St. Albans, Vermont.  They robbed the banks in town, tried to set fire to the downtown commercial district, shot and killed one person, and then fled north to Canada with $227,000 in their saddlebags.  The St. Albans Raid sent shock waves throughout the North.  A fraction of the stolen money made its way back to St. Albans, but a series of Canadian trials ended in the dismissal of all charges against Young and his men.  Kevin Graffagnino's "Rebels in Vermont!" presentation details the events of the raid and also looks at the lives and careers of the Confederate participants, providing more of a Southern perspective than most Northern versions of the story.

J. Kevin Graffagnino is Director of the William L. Clements Library of early American history at the University of Michigan.  In a long career, Kevin has been an antiquarian book dealer, special collections curator, library administrator, and Executive Director of the Vermont and Kentucky state historical societies.  He holds two degrees from the University of Vermont and a Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.  Kevin's publications on early American history and bibliophilic topics include 17 books, the most recent of which is The Vermont Difference: Perspectives from the Green Mountain State (2014)

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

details
Public Program Civil War Boston 21 October 2014.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Barbara Berenson Boston’s black and white abolitionists forged a second American revolution dedicated to ending ...

Boston and the Civil War book coverBoston’s black and white abolitionists forged a second American revolution dedicated to ending slavery and honoring the promise of liberty made in the Declaration of Independence. Before the war, Bostonians were bitterly divided between those who supported the Union and those opposed to its endorsement of slavery. The Fugitive Slave Act brought the horrors of slavery close to home and led many to join the abolitionists. March to war with Boston’s brave soldiers, including the grandson of Patriot Paul Revere and the Fighting Irish. The all-black Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Regiment battled against both slavery and discrimination, while Boston’s women fought tirelessly against slavery and for their own right to be full citizens of the Union. Join local historian and author Barbara F. Berenson on a thrilling and memorable journey through Civil War Boston. 

Barbara F. Berenson is the author of Walking Tours of Civil War Boston: Hub of Abolitionism (2011, 2nd ed. 2014) and co-editor of Breaking Barriers: The Unfinished Story of Women Lawyers and Judges in Massachusetts (2012). A graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School, Barbara works as a senior attorney at the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court.

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More events
Special Event MHS Graduate Student Reception 18 September 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM this event is free

All graduate students in American history and related subjects are invited to attend. Faculty members in these fields are also welcome.

Begin the new academic year by meeting graduate students and faculty from other universities who are also working in your field. Enjoy refreshments, take a tour of MHS departments, and learn about the range of resources available to support your work, including MHS fellowship programs. Refreshments and networking begin at 6:00 p.m. and run throughout the evening. Program begins at 6:30 p.m.

No charge. RSVP required by September 17. Email kviens@masshist.org or phone 617-646-0568 with your name and affiliation. Indicate whether you are a graduate student or faculty member.

close
Public Program Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 26 September 2014 to 27 September 2014 registration required This event will take place at the Framingham History Center.

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation in 1776? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in Framingham and other nearby towns as the Americans attempted to create a new nation in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story. 

Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • discover what changed (or didn't change) for the inhabitants of the Framingham area as new government structures were implemented after the American Revolution.
  • discuss the concerns (both local and national) expressed by Massachusetts residents in various towns during the era of the Early Republic.
  • explore the ways in which geography, economy, and social/cultural practices influenced local concerns.
  • discover evidence of local concerns, and discussions of national policies, in primary sources held by the Framingham History Center and the Massachusetts Historical Society.
  •  explore new ways of engaging students and local communities in their history.

To Register
Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

close
Public Program The Trials of Old New England Towns in a New Nation 1 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Mary Fuhrer, Independent Scholar

Mary White, circa 1840. Courtesy Boylston Historical Society.We tend to think of New England towns in the first decades of the 19th century as peaceful, bucolic havens -- they were not. In this talk, Mary Babson Fuhrer will discuss the remarkable stories of conflict and transformation that reshaped local communities in the decades leading up to the Civil War. As people struggled to work out the promises of the Revolution on the personal level, contrary ideals of community identity and individual interests clashed, until, as one observer noted, "the most malignant passions of our depraved natures raged." The diaries, letters, and account books she draws on form the basis of her recent book, Crisis of Community: Trials and Transformation of a New England Town, 1815-1848.

Mary Babson Fuhrer is a public historian and independent scholar who lives in Littleton, Mass. Fuhrer provides research, interpretation, and programs for humanities associations, museums, historical societies, and educational institutions. She specializes in using primary sources to recover everyday lives from the past. Her scholarship has received generous support from the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, the Massachusetts Historical Society, the American Antiquarian Society, and the New England Regional Fellowship Consortium. Fuhrer was recently awarded the Massachusetts History Commendation for 2014 by the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities. She is currently pursuing research on the illness narratives of consumptives (tubercular patients) across gender, class, ethnicity, and race in antebellum New England.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

close
Public Program Katherine, Grace, and Mary: Archaeological Revelations of 17th and 18th Century Women from Boston's Big Dig 6 October 2014.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Joe Bagley, Boston City Archaeologist

A mid-18th century porringer pot by Grace Parker found at the Three Cranes TavernThe archaeological surveys conducted prior to the beginning of Boston's infamous Big Dig resulted in the uncovering of mountains of historical data on Boston's deep history.  Three archaeological sites stand out for their contributions to Women's history in Boston. These include the late 17th century site of Katherine Nanny Naylor, the early 18th century site of Mary Long, and the mid-18th century site of Grace Parker.  Katherine was the first woman to legally divorce her husband in Puritan Massachusetts, Mary was the operator of the Three Cranes Tavern in Charlestown---the cultural and physical heart of the Charlestown community, and Grace owned and operated the most successful ceramic business in Boston producing wears with her distinctive brush strokes.  Together, these three women paint a complicated and nuanced history of Boston that goes far beyond what is typically known or written about women in these periods.  Join City Archaeologist Joe Bagley as he discusses the information uncovered about these three women and their contributions to the history and culture of Boston.

Joe Bagley is the City Archaeologist of Boston.  As a City employee, Joe executed archaeological surveys on city-owned land, reviewed construction and development projects that could impact archaeological sites, and promotes Boston's archaeology through public events and talks.  Joe received his BA in Archaeology from Boston University and his MA in Historical Archaeology from UMass Boston.  He has been conducting archaeological surveys in New England on historic and Native sites for over a dozen years.  He is also the live-in caretaker of the Dorchester Historical Society's William Clapp House where he lives with his wife Jen and his dog, Jack.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

http://www.cityofboston.gov/archaeology/

https://www.facebook.com/BostonArchaeologyProgram

close
Member Event, Special Event History Revealed: Thomas Hutchinson and the Stamp Act Riots 8 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost This event is open only to MHS Fellows and Members Thomas Hutchinson

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special evening at the Society as John W. Tyler, editor of The Correspondence of Thomas Hutchinson: 1740-1766 (2014), relays the story of Lt. Gov. Thomas Hutchinson and how he came to be on the losing side of the American Revolution. His house was destroyed by a mob during the Stamp Act riots, a milestone in the series of acts of civil disobedience that made Boston notorious in the eyes of the British government. A pair of fire tongs salvaged from that evening and now in the collections of the MHS will be on display along with other objects related to Hutchinson and the coming of the American Revolution.

6:00 PM: Reception
6:30 PM: Remarks by John W. Tyler followed by a presentation of items from the Society's collections

Become a Member today!

close
Special Event, Public Program Opening Our Doors Open House 13 October 2014.Monday, 10:00AM - 3:00PM this event is free

Join us as part of Opening Our Doors, Boston’s largest single day of free arts and cultural events. Stop by to view Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in the First World War. This event is free and open to the public.

close
Public Program Rebels in Vermont!: The St. Albans Raid 15 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm J. Kevin Graffagnino, William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan

Orleans County broadsideOn October 19, 1864, twenty-two Confederate soldiers under the command of Bennett H. Young attacked the village of St. Albans, Vermont.  They robbed the banks in town, tried to set fire to the downtown commercial district, shot and killed one person, and then fled north to Canada with $227,000 in their saddlebags.  The St. Albans Raid sent shock waves throughout the North.  A fraction of the stolen money made its way back to St. Albans, but a series of Canadian trials ended in the dismissal of all charges against Young and his men.  Kevin Graffagnino's "Rebels in Vermont!" presentation details the events of the raid and also looks at the lives and careers of the Confederate participants, providing more of a Southern perspective than most Northern versions of the story.

J. Kevin Graffagnino is Director of the William L. Clements Library of early American history at the University of Michigan.  In a long career, Kevin has been an antiquarian book dealer, special collections curator, library administrator, and Executive Director of the Vermont and Kentucky state historical societies.  He holds two degrees from the University of Vermont and a Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.  Kevin's publications on early American history and bibliophilic topics include 17 books, the most recent of which is The Vermont Difference: Perspectives from the Green Mountain State (2014)

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

close
Public Program Civil War Boston 21 October 2014.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Barbara Berenson

Boston and the Civil War book coverBoston’s black and white abolitionists forged a second American revolution dedicated to ending slavery and honoring the promise of liberty made in the Declaration of Independence. Before the war, Bostonians were bitterly divided between those who supported the Union and those opposed to its endorsement of slavery. The Fugitive Slave Act brought the horrors of slavery close to home and led many to join the abolitionists. March to war with Boston’s brave soldiers, including the grandson of Patriot Paul Revere and the Fighting Irish. The all-black Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Regiment battled against both slavery and discrimination, while Boston’s women fought tirelessly against slavery and for their own right to be full citizens of the Union. Join local historian and author Barbara F. Berenson on a thrilling and memorable journey through Civil War Boston. 

Barbara F. Berenson is the author of Walking Tours of Civil War Boston: Hub of Abolitionism (2011, 2nd ed. 2014) and co-editor of Breaking Barriers: The Unfinished Story of Women Lawyers and Judges in Massachusetts (2012). A graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School, Barbara works as a senior attorney at the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court.

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