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Adams Family Papers : An Electronic Archive

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Searched all words in Autobiography of John Adams for The Weather has been and held so uncommonly cold ever since you left me

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John Adams autobiography, part 2, "Travels, and Negotiations," 1777-1778, sheet 21 of 37 [electronic edition]
... . Such a disposition, in any Traveller, in any Country, I should esteem a Mark of a littleness of Mind: but in a Person situated as I am, and sustaining the public trust, that has been committed to me, I should hold it, not only an Absurdity, but a Misdemeanor. The Gentleman you allude to, I hope has been more upon his guard, because from a long Acquaintance, with his Character and conduct, I know he has ...
John Adams autobiography, part 3, "Peace," 1779-1780, sheet 17 of 18 [electronic edition]
... of the same agreable Acquaintance, which has ever subsisted between Us, and wish you to believe me, with esteem your Friend and humble Servant John Adams. Jonathan Williams Esqr. at Nantes. Paris Feb. 15. 1780 Dear Sir I have the pleasure to inclose to you, two Letters, from your Friends at Boston, who are all well except Mr. Gray your Brother, who is not probably now living ...
John Adams autobiography, part 1, "John Adams," through 1776, sheet 6 of 53 [electronic edition]
... little not of much consequence at the time, and have never been able to account for since. Mr. Putnam should have presented me, to the Court of Common Pleas in Worcester, and a Certificate of my Oath and Admission, before that Court would have been a sufficient Ground, to justify the Court of Common Pleas in Suffolk, on receiving me there. This was however omitted, and I removed to Braintree ...
John Adams autobiography, part 2, "Travels, and Negotiations," 1777-1778, sheet 19 of 37 [electronic edition]
... a Year since, and you have not performed that promise. The Disappointment has been very inconvenient to Us. Probably it was occasioned by your not receiving the Remittances you expected. However, We think you should have foreborne entering into any fresh contracts and Embarrassments; especially, as it was not required or expected of you, by the Committee, as appears by their Letter to you of Decr ...
John Adams autobiography, part 1, "John Adams," through 1776, sheet 51 of 53 [electronic edition]
... of some part of New England, but seldom any thing of the Kind about any other Part of the Continent. You complain of the popular Plan of raising the new Army. But if you make the plan as unpopular, as you please, you will not mend the matter. If you leave the Appointment of Officers to the General, or to the Congress, it will not be so well done, as if left to the Assemblies ...
John Adams autobiography, part 2, "Travels, and Negotiations," 1777-1778, sheet 23 of 37 [electronic edition]
... ? and what has been your Employment? A Taylor.... You never stole a Horse before I suppose in your Life? Never.... [line] What Business had you with Horse Stealing? Why did not you content yourself with your Cabbage? May 21. Thursday 1778. Dined at Home The disputes between the Parties had by this time become so well known to me, and their violence had arisen ...
John Adams autobiography, part 1, "John Adams," through 1776, sheet 47 of 53 [electronic edition]
... , of Independence, was the Result of long and cool deliberation. That it had been made by Congress, after long and great Reluctance, in Obedience to the possitive Instructions of their Constituents; every Assembly upon the Continent, having instructed their Delegates to this Purpose, and since the Declaration has been made And published, it has been solemnly ratified and confirmed by the Assemblies: so ...
John Adams autobiography, part 1, "John Adams," through 1776, sheet 43 of 53 [electronic edition]
... said I had read his Letters to Dr. Cooper in which he had advanced, that Nobody ever got cold by going into a cold Church, or any other cold Air: but the Theory was so little consistent with my experience, that I thought it a Paradox: However I had so much curiosity to hear his reasons, that I would run the risque of a cold. The Doctor then began an harrangue, upon Air and cold and Respiration ...
John Adams autobiography, part 2, "Travels, and Negotiations," 1777-1778, sheet 20 of 37 [electronic edition]
... had attained any maturity in Age, Reading and reflection had I imbibed any general Prejudice against Kings, or in favour of them. It appeared to me then as it has done ever since, that there is a State of Society in which a Republican Government is the best, and in America the only one which ought to be adopted or thought of, because the morals of the People and Circumstances of the Country ...
John Adams autobiography, part 1, "John Adams," through 1776, sheet 3 of 53 [electronic edition]
... There Child, said he is a dictionary, and there a Gramar, andthere Paper, Pen and Ink, and you may take your own time. This was joyfull news to me and I then thought my Admission safe. The Latin was soon made, and I was declared Admitted and a Theme given me, to write on in the Vacation. I was as light when I came home as I had been heavy when I went: my Master was well pleased ...

Searched all words in Autobiography of John Adams for The Weather has been and held so uncommonly cold ever since you left me