A website from the Massachusetts Historical Society; founded 1791.
Adams Family Papers : An Electronic Archive

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Searched all words in all documents for The Weather has been and held so uncommonly cold ever since you left me

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John Adams autobiography, part 2, "Travels, and Negotiations," 1777-1778, sheet 26 of 37 [electronic edition]
... that of my Colleague Dr. Franklin. It is and always has been with great reluctance, that I have felt myself under the Necessity of stating any facts which may diminish the Reputation of this extraordinary Man, but the Truth is more sacred than any Character, and there is no reason that the Character of Mr. Lee and Mr. Izzard not to mention my own, should be sacrificed in unjust tenderness to ...
John Adams autobiography, part 2, "Travels, and Negotiations," 1777-1778, sheet 28 of 37 [electronic edition]
... Excellency to give such orders, relative to it, in all his Majestys Ports, as may regulate this, for the future. The Captain of the Ship of War the Ranger, belonging to the United States, has We understand, put his Prizes into the hands of the Intendant or Commandant at Brest, and no Account has been rendered of them, to the Public Agent or to Us. We are also given to understand, that in ...
Letter from John Adams to Abigail Adams, 6 July 1774, "Mobs are the trite Topick..." [electronic edition]
... . Verbal Scandal has been propagated in great Abundance by both Parties. But there is this Difference, that one Party have enjoyed almost all public Offices, and therefore their Deffamation has been spread among the People more secretly, more maliciously and more effectually. It has gone with greater Authority, and been scattered by Instruments more industrious. The ministerial News Papers have ...
John Adams autobiography, part 2, "Travels, and Negotiations," 1777-1778, sheet 17 of 37 [electronic edition]
... Stephen." Well, said the Marshall, rubbing his hand which was throbbing tingling with the Smart, "if it had been Stephen, you ought not to have struck so hard" and said no more upon the Subject. -- This Story I understood, because I had read something like it in Rousseau. Dined at home this day with Mr. Lee, who spent the day with me upon the public business. In the Evening We went to the ...
Letter from John Adams to Abigail Adams, 17 August 1782, "The Situation of my dear Brother . . ." [electronic edition]
... August 17. 1782 My dearest Friend The Situation of my dear Brother, at the date of yours 17 June, has allarmed me so much that I dread to hear any further News of him. An Affection for him has grown old with me as it commenced very early in Life has and has constantly increased. Mr. Smiths Letter of 6 of May did not surprise me so much because I had often known him in great ...
Letter from John Adams to Abigail Adams, 27 December 1796, "The inclosed extract of a Letter..." [electronic edition]
... blind Adoration and mysterious influence of a name." The Sting at the retiring Hero, hurts me. Science, in Some of its Branches, may not have been possessed in any eminent Degrees: but Talents of a very Superiour kind are his. I wish I had as good, and Science of himself and others, beyond almost any Man he has shewn all his Life. I never shall attain so much of that most necessary and Useful ...
Letter from John Adams to Abigail Adams, 10 September 1783, "The negotiation . . ." [electronic edition]
... at their School and the Farm in the Care of your Uncle Quincy, Dr. Tufts, your Father, Mr. Cranch or other good Friends. It will be attended how ever with Difficulties, and all is yet unsettled in Congress So that we shall probably have to go home together next Spring. I must leave if therefore to the advice of your Friends and your own Judgement to embark this fall or stay till Spring. If ...
Letter from John Adams to Abigail Adams, 29 June 1774, "This is the second day of the Term..." [electronic edition]
... York June 29. 1774 This is the second day of the Term at York: very little Business -- very hot weather. My Refreshment is a flight to B. Braintree to my Corn fields and Grass Plotts, my Gardens and Meadows. My Fancy runs about you perpetually. It is continually with you and in the Neighbourhood of you -- frequently takes a Walk with you, and your little prattling, Nabby ...
Letter from John Adams to Abigail Adams, 29 October 1775, "There is, in the human breast..." [electronic edition]
... sometimes, leads me to expose myself to just Ridicule. New England has in many Respects the Advantage of every other Colony in America, and indeed of every other Part of the World, that I know any Thing of. 1. The People are purer English Blood, less mixed with Scotch, Irish, Dutch, French, Danish, Sweedish &c. than any other; and descended from Englishmen too who left Europe, in purer ...
Letter from John Adams to Abigail Adams, 27 December 1796, "I received yours of the 14..." [electronic edition]
... well as Tenche Coxe. What a Puppy this last? He left his Card. I was at home when the other came and had a Conversation with him civilly enough. The Prospect before me, opens many Questions and Inquiries concerning House, Furniture, Equipage, Servants and many other Things which will give me trouble and occupation enough and the more because you will not be here. Luckily for you. I should ...

Searched all words in all documents for The Weather has been and held so uncommonly cold ever since you left me