Public Programs and Special Events

Exhibition

Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country

Massachusetts Women in WWI. 12 June 2014 to 24 January 2015

Details

The MHS offers many engaging programs and special events.

March

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Writing with Scissors Public Program Writing with Scissors: 19th-Century Activists & Their Scrapbooks 27 March 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 PM Ellen Gruber Garvey, New Jersey City University Part of the "New Books/New Looks: Revisiting the Past" series Men and women 150 years ago grappled with information overload by making scrapbooks—the ...

Writing with ScissorsMen and women 150 years ago grappled with information overload by making scrapbooks—the ancestors of Google and blogging. Mark Twain and Susan B. Anthony, abolitionists and Confederates, African American janitors and farmwomen cut out and pasted down their reading. Professor Garvey will discuss these various perspectives, covered in her recent book Writing with Scissors, including the findings she uncovered while doing research at the MHS. All scrapbook makers passed along their understanding that the press was not a simple record, but a set of voices and conversations.

Reservations requested. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0560 / education@masshist.org.

details
April
Public Program Massachusetts and the Civil War in Black and White: The Commonwealth’s Role in Secession, Emancipation, and Reconstruction 4 April 2013.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   John Stauffer, Harvard University Prof. Stauffer is a member of Harvard’s English Department and the chair of the ...

Prof. Stauffer is a member of Harvard’s English Department and the chair of the university’s graduate program on the History of American Civilization. He will speak on the contribution of the Bay State’s black and white abolitionists and political leaders to secession, freedom, and equality under the law. He will also discuss briefly how the state responded to the "counter-Revolution" that stripped away these new rights after Reconstruction. This lecture and the reception that will follow will be free and open to the public. This program is also the keynote address for the MHS conference Massachusetts and the Civil War: The Commonwealth and National Disunion.

details
Public Program Defiant Brides of the American Revolution 10 April 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 PM Nancy Rubin Stuart Part of the "New Books/New Looks: Revisiting the Past" series How did the marriages to Benedict Arnold and Henry Knox change the lives and personal development of ...

How did the marriages to Benedict Arnold and Henry Knox change the lives and personal development of their brides, Peggy Shippen and Lucy Knox? Nancy Rubin Stuart’s talk reveals the contradictory paths two young women followed subsequent to their passionate marriages to patriotic men during the American Revolution and the early Federal era. Using historical correspondence and historical drawings and portraits, Ms. Stuart will shed light on how these defiant brides affected the course of the Revolution. Ms. Stuart is an award-winning author and journalist who specializes in women and social history.

Reservations requested. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0560 / education@masshist.org.

details
Special Event, Member Event Historical Happy Hour 10 April 2013.Wednesday, 7:30PM - 8:30PM Special event for MHS Associate Members MHS Associate Members are invited to the second Historical Happy Hour. Following the talk by Nancy ...

MHS Associate Members are invited to the second Historical Happy Hour. Following the talk by Nancy Rubin Stuartwe will continue the conversation while enjoying a cocktail at The Back Bay Social Club located at 867 Boylston Street.

Associate Members and their guests will receive priority admission to the program as well as complimentary appetizers and a drink at the Happy Hour. A cash bar will also be available. The program is open to the public, but the Historical Happy Hour is only for Associate Members and their guests.

Registration is required. Please contact Katy Capó at 617-646-0518 with any questions. 


Evening Lecture

Defiant Brides of the American Revolution
6:00 PM
Nancy Rubin Stuart

How did the marriages to Benedict Arnold and Henry Knox change the lives and personal development of their brides, Peggy Shippen and Lucy Knox? Nancy Rubin Stuart’s talk reveals the contradictory paths two young women followed subsequent to their passionate marriages to patriotic men during the American Revolution and the early Federal era. Using historical correspondence and historical drawings and portraits, Ms. Stuart will shed light on how these defiant brides affected the course of the Revolution. Ms. Stuart is an award-winning author and journalist who specializes in women and social history.

details
Public Program “You Know I Dislike Slavery”: Lincoln before the Presidency 12 April 2013.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Exhibition Spotlight Elaine Grublin, Massachusetts Historical Society Focusing on the text of the August 1855 letter Lincoln wrote to his friend Joshua Fry Speed, Elaine ...

Focusing on the text of the August 1855 letter Lincoln wrote to his friend Joshua Fry Speed, Elaine Grublin, MHS Head of Reader Services, will discuss Lincoln’s early thoughts on slavery in America and his reaction to the rise of the American (“Know-Nothing”) Party.

details
Special Event Bus Trip to the Museum of World War II 26 April 2013.Friday, 11:00AM - 5:00PM Special event for Members of the MHS Fund Paine through Adams Circles This special event is open to Members of the MHS Fund Paine through Adams Circles. Enjoy a special ...

This special event is open to Members of the MHS Fund Paine through Adams Circles. Enjoy a special lunch and behind-the-scenes tour of the Museum of World War II with Founder and Director Kenneth Rendell. The museum houses the most comprehensive collection of WWII artifacts on display anywhere in the world. A bus will leave from the MHS at 11 AM and return by 5 PM.  Space is limited. RSVP required. Fee: $50. Part of the MHS Local Travel Series.

For more information or to register, contact Katy Capó at kcapo@masshist.org or 617-646-0518.

details
Public Program Authors & Abolitionists 28 April 2013.Sunday, 2:00PM - 4:30PM Please RSVP   Location: Concord, Mass. Jayne Gordon, Massachusetts Historical Society Slavery was the great social and moral issue of the 19th century, and Concord was a hotbed of ...

Slavery was the great social and moral issue of the 19th century, and Concord was a hotbed of abolitionist sentiment. Residents Emerson, Thoreau, and the Alcotts confronted slavery head-on in their writings and actions, as indignation turned to outrage. This leisurely two-mile walking tour explores the involvement of these authors and their neighbors in antislavery efforts in Concord and beyond. It begins and ends at the Concord train depot (an easy ride out from Boston and Cambridge) and is coordinated with the Sunday train schedule. Walk leader Jayne Gordon, MHS Director of Education and Public Programs, is a resident of Concord who has worked at most of the town’s historic sites. She teaches the Concord history course required for all town guides.

Registration Required. Fee $25/$15 (F/M); Free for MHS Fund Giving Circle members. Light refreshments included. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 508-577-4599 / education@masshist.org.

details
May
Public Program Bunker Hill: A City, A Siege, A Revolution 1 May 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Location: Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard St., Brookline Nathaniel Philbrick Nathaniel Philbrick, the bestselling author of In the Heart of the Sea and ...

Nathaniel Philbrick, the bestselling author of In the Heart of the Sea and Mayflower, brings his prodigious talents to the story of the first major battle of the American Revolution. Boston in 1775 is an island city occupied by British troops after a series of incendiary incidents by patriots who range from sober citizens to thuggish vigilantes. After the Boston Tea Party, British and American soldiers and Massachusetts residents have warily maneuvered around each other until 19 April, when violence finally erupts at Lexington and Concord. In June, however, with the city cut off from supplies by a British blockade and Patriot militia poised in siege, skirmishes give way to outright war in the Battle of Bunker Hill. It would be the bloodiest battle of the Revolution to come, and the point of no return for the rebellious colonists.

Nathaniel Philbrick is the New York Times bestselling author of National Book Award winner In the Heart of the Sea, Pulitzer Prize finalist Mayflower, Sea of Glory, and The Last Stand. He is also the author of Why Read Moby- Dick? and Away Off Shore. He lives on Nantucket.

Tickets

  • Tickets will go on sale on Monday, April 8, 2013.
  • Tickets are $5 per person and are available from Brookline Booksmith.
  • Please visit brooklinebooksmith.com/tickets or call 617-566-6660 to reserve your space!
  • When you purchase the book, you receive one free ticket and the option to purchase a second ticket for $5.

This event is co-sponsored with Brookline Booksmith and will take place at the Coolidge Corner Theater in Brookline. For directions, please visit http://www.coolidge.org/. 

details
Public Program The Three Lives of Anthony Burns 3 May 2013.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Exhibition Spotlight Peter Drummey, Massachusetts Historical Society The rendition of Anthony Burns—his return from Boston to slavery in 1854—was a turning ...

The rendition of Anthony Burns—his return from Boston to slavery in 1854—was a turning point in the Abolitionist struggle. But who was Anthony Burns? A fugitive slave? A symbol of the antislavery cause in Boston? What happened to him after he was freed and his celebrity faded? We will explore the heroic, and tragic, life of Anthony Burns through documents on display at the Society.

details
Public Program New Perspectives on Jefferson's Monticello: House, Landscape, and Family 8 May 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 PM Susan R. Stein, Monticello Annual Jefferson Lecture The wide lens of this talk will focus on recent restoration and interpretive efforts including ...

The wide lens of this talk will focus on recent restoration and interpretive efforts including Monticello's work spaces beneath the house, public rooms, and upper floors as well as Mulberry Row, the plantation's principal street. The discussion will also describe Monticello's free and enslaved community. Susan R. Stein is the longtime Richard Gilder Senior Curator and Vice President for Museum Programs.

Reservations requested. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0560 / education@masshist.org.

details
More events
Public Program Writing with Scissors: 19th-Century Activists & Their Scrapbooks 27 March 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 PM Ellen Gruber Garvey, New Jersey City University Part of the "New Books/New Looks: Revisiting the Past" series Writing with Scissors

Writing with ScissorsMen and women 150 years ago grappled with information overload by making scrapbooks—the ancestors of Google and blogging. Mark Twain and Susan B. Anthony, abolitionists and Confederates, African American janitors and farmwomen cut out and pasted down their reading. Professor Garvey will discuss these various perspectives, covered in her recent book Writing with Scissors, including the findings she uncovered while doing research at the MHS. All scrapbook makers passed along their understanding that the press was not a simple record, but a set of voices and conversations.

Reservations requested. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0560 / education@masshist.org.

close
Public Program Massachusetts and the Civil War in Black and White: The Commonwealth’s Role in Secession, Emancipation, and Reconstruction 4 April 2013.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost John Stauffer, Harvard University

Prof. Stauffer is a member of Harvard’s English Department and the chair of the university’s graduate program on the History of American Civilization. He will speak on the contribution of the Bay State’s black and white abolitionists and political leaders to secession, freedom, and equality under the law. He will also discuss briefly how the state responded to the "counter-Revolution" that stripped away these new rights after Reconstruction. This lecture and the reception that will follow will be free and open to the public. This program is also the keynote address for the MHS conference Massachusetts and the Civil War: The Commonwealth and National Disunion.

close
Public Program Defiant Brides of the American Revolution 10 April 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 PM Nancy Rubin Stuart Part of the "New Books/New Looks: Revisiting the Past" series

How did the marriages to Benedict Arnold and Henry Knox change the lives and personal development of their brides, Peggy Shippen and Lucy Knox? Nancy Rubin Stuart’s talk reveals the contradictory paths two young women followed subsequent to their passionate marriages to patriotic men during the American Revolution and the early Federal era. Using historical correspondence and historical drawings and portraits, Ms. Stuart will shed light on how these defiant brides affected the course of the Revolution. Ms. Stuart is an award-winning author and journalist who specializes in women and social history.

Reservations requested. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0560 / education@masshist.org.

close
Special Event, Member Event Historical Happy Hour 10 April 2013.Wednesday, 7:30PM - 8:30PM registration required at no cost Special event for MHS Associate Members

MHS Associate Members are invited to the second Historical Happy Hour. Following the talk by Nancy Rubin Stuartwe will continue the conversation while enjoying a cocktail at The Back Bay Social Club located at 867 Boylston Street.

Associate Members and their guests will receive priority admission to the program as well as complimentary appetizers and a drink at the Happy Hour. A cash bar will also be available. The program is open to the public, but the Historical Happy Hour is only for Associate Members and their guests.

Registration is required. Please contact Katy Capó at 617-646-0518 with any questions. 


Evening Lecture

Defiant Brides of the American Revolution
6:00 PM
Nancy Rubin Stuart

How did the marriages to Benedict Arnold and Henry Knox change the lives and personal development of their brides, Peggy Shippen and Lucy Knox? Nancy Rubin Stuart’s talk reveals the contradictory paths two young women followed subsequent to their passionate marriages to patriotic men during the American Revolution and the early Federal era. Using historical correspondence and historical drawings and portraits, Ms. Stuart will shed light on how these defiant brides affected the course of the Revolution. Ms. Stuart is an award-winning author and journalist who specializes in women and social history.

close
Public Program “You Know I Dislike Slavery”: Lincoln before the Presidency 12 April 2013.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM this event is free Exhibition Spotlight Elaine Grublin, Massachusetts Historical Society

Focusing on the text of the August 1855 letter Lincoln wrote to his friend Joshua Fry Speed, Elaine Grublin, MHS Head of Reader Services, will discuss Lincoln’s early thoughts on slavery in America and his reaction to the rise of the American (“Know-Nothing”) Party.

close
Special Event Bus Trip to the Museum of World War II 26 April 2013.Friday, 11:00AM - 5:00PM registration required Special event for Members of the MHS Fund Paine through Adams Circles

This special event is open to Members of the MHS Fund Paine through Adams Circles. Enjoy a special lunch and behind-the-scenes tour of the Museum of World War II with Founder and Director Kenneth Rendell. The museum houses the most comprehensive collection of WWII artifacts on display anywhere in the world. A bus will leave from the MHS at 11 AM and return by 5 PM.  Space is limited. RSVP required. Fee: $50. Part of the MHS Local Travel Series.

For more information or to register, contact Katy Capó at kcapo@masshist.org or 617-646-0518.

close
Public Program Authors & Abolitionists 28 April 2013.Sunday, 2:00PM - 4:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Location: Concord, Mass. Jayne Gordon, Massachusetts Historical Society

Slavery was the great social and moral issue of the 19th century, and Concord was a hotbed of abolitionist sentiment. Residents Emerson, Thoreau, and the Alcotts confronted slavery head-on in their writings and actions, as indignation turned to outrage. This leisurely two-mile walking tour explores the involvement of these authors and their neighbors in antislavery efforts in Concord and beyond. It begins and ends at the Concord train depot (an easy ride out from Boston and Cambridge) and is coordinated with the Sunday train schedule. Walk leader Jayne Gordon, MHS Director of Education and Public Programs, is a resident of Concord who has worked at most of the town’s historic sites. She teaches the Concord history course required for all town guides.

Registration Required. Fee $25/$15 (F/M); Free for MHS Fund Giving Circle members. Light refreshments included. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 508-577-4599 / education@masshist.org.

close
Public Program Bunker Hill: A City, A Siege, A Revolution 1 May 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM registration required Location: Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard St., Brookline Nathaniel Philbrick

Nathaniel Philbrick, the bestselling author of In the Heart of the Sea and Mayflower, brings his prodigious talents to the story of the first major battle of the American Revolution. Boston in 1775 is an island city occupied by British troops after a series of incendiary incidents by patriots who range from sober citizens to thuggish vigilantes. After the Boston Tea Party, British and American soldiers and Massachusetts residents have warily maneuvered around each other until 19 April, when violence finally erupts at Lexington and Concord. In June, however, with the city cut off from supplies by a British blockade and Patriot militia poised in siege, skirmishes give way to outright war in the Battle of Bunker Hill. It would be the bloodiest battle of the Revolution to come, and the point of no return for the rebellious colonists.

Nathaniel Philbrick is the New York Times bestselling author of National Book Award winner In the Heart of the Sea, Pulitzer Prize finalist Mayflower, Sea of Glory, and The Last Stand. He is also the author of Why Read Moby- Dick? and Away Off Shore. He lives on Nantucket.

Tickets

  • Tickets will go on sale on Monday, April 8, 2013.
  • Tickets are $5 per person and are available from Brookline Booksmith.
  • Please visit brooklinebooksmith.com/tickets or call 617-566-6660 to reserve your space!
  • When you purchase the book, you receive one free ticket and the option to purchase a second ticket for $5.

This event is co-sponsored with Brookline Booksmith and will take place at the Coolidge Corner Theater in Brookline. For directions, please visit http://www.coolidge.org/. 

close
Public Program The Three Lives of Anthony Burns 3 May 2013.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM this event is free Exhibition Spotlight Peter Drummey, Massachusetts Historical Society

The rendition of Anthony Burns—his return from Boston to slavery in 1854—was a turning point in the Abolitionist struggle. But who was Anthony Burns? A fugitive slave? A symbol of the antislavery cause in Boston? What happened to him after he was freed and his celebrity faded? We will explore the heroic, and tragic, life of Anthony Burns through documents on display at the Society.

close
Public Program New Perspectives on Jefferson's Monticello: House, Landscape, and Family 8 May 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 PM Susan R. Stein, Monticello Annual Jefferson Lecture

The wide lens of this talk will focus on recent restoration and interpretive efforts including Monticello's work spaces beneath the house, public rooms, and upper floors as well as Mulberry Row, the plantation's principal street. The discussion will also describe Monticello's free and enslaved community. Susan R. Stein is the longtime Richard Gilder Senior Curator and Vice President for Museum Programs.

Reservations requested. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0560 / education@masshist.org.

close

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