Public Programs and Special Events

Exhibition

Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country

Massachusetts Women in WWI. 12 June 2014 to 24 January 2015

Details

The MHS offers many engaging programs and special events.

March

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Public Program Walking the Great Beach with a Volume of the MHS "Collections" in Hand 6 March 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 PM Peter Drummey, Massachusetts Historical Society Part of "The Object of History" series In Cape Cod, Henry David Thoreau describes using an early MHS publication as a sort of ...

In Cape Cod, Henry David Thoreau describes using an early MHS publication as a sort of antiquarian travel guide -- a way of looking back on the landscape he traversed as it had been described almost 50 years earlier. What did the founders of the MHS set out to print and what have later generations made of our early publications?

The Object of History
A series of chats with MHS Librarian Peter Drummey about what documents and artifacts from the collections can tell us about the characters, events, and issues of the past, as well as the role of MHS in documenting the rich history of our state and nation.

Registration Required. Fee $25/$15 (F/M); Free for MHS Fund Giving Circle members. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0557 / education@masshist.org.

Register for all three programs in “The Object of History” series and receive a registration discount! Series fee: $60/30 (F/M); Free for MHS Fund Circle members.

details
Public Program An Evening with Margaret Fuller in Italy 13 March 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   This event is SOLD OUT. Megan Marshall and Newpoli Part of the "New Books/New Looks: Revisiting the Past" series Prize-winning author and MHS Fellow Megan Marshall will read from Margaret Fuller: A New ...

Prize-winning author and MHS Fellow Megan Marshall will read from Margaret Fuller: A New American Life, her biography of the 19th-century heroine who spent her last years in Rome and Florence as a war correspondent covering the early stages of Italy’s Risorgimento. How should we remember this period in Fuller’s life, particularly given the scandal of her love affair with Giovanni Ossoli? Folk ensemble Newpoli will conjure the vibrant music that Fuller came to love as emblematic of Italy. Ms. Marshall is the author of The Peabody Sisters: Three Women Who Ignited American Romanticism, winner of the Francis Parkman Prize, the Mark Lynton History Prize, the Massachusetts Book Award, and a Pulitzer Prize finalist. Newpoli performs southern Italian folk music from the Middle Ages to the 19th century.

Reservations requested. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0560 / education@masshist.org.

details
Public Program “Our Fanaticism”: Garrison’s Antislavery Banners 15 March 2013.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Exhibition Spotlight Anne Bentley, Massachusetts Historical Society Curator of Art Anne Bentley will examine the nature and use of our set of William Lloyd ...

Curator of Art Anne Bentley will examine the nature and use of our set of William Lloyd Garrison’s banners, displayed circa 1840s to 1850s in local fairs and demonstrations sponsored by the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society.

details
Writing with Scissors Public Program Writing with Scissors: 19th-Century Activists & Their Scrapbooks 27 March 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 PM Ellen Gruber Garvey, New Jersey City University Part of the "New Books/New Looks: Revisiting the Past" series Men and women 150 years ago grappled with information overload by making scrapbooks—the ...

Writing with ScissorsMen and women 150 years ago grappled with information overload by making scrapbooks—the ancestors of Google and blogging. Mark Twain and Susan B. Anthony, abolitionists and Confederates, African American janitors and farmwomen cut out and pasted down their reading. Professor Garvey will discuss these various perspectives, covered in her recent book Writing with Scissors, including the findings she uncovered while doing research at the MHS. All scrapbook makers passed along their understanding that the press was not a simple record, but a set of voices and conversations.

Reservations requested. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0560 / education@masshist.org.

details
April
Public Program Massachusetts and the Civil War in Black and White: The Commonwealth’s Role in Secession, Emancipation, and Reconstruction 4 April 2013.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   John Stauffer, Harvard University Prof. Stauffer is a member of Harvard’s English Department and the chair of the ...

Prof. Stauffer is a member of Harvard’s English Department and the chair of the university’s graduate program on the History of American Civilization. He will speak on the contribution of the Bay State’s black and white abolitionists and political leaders to secession, freedom, and equality under the law. He will also discuss briefly how the state responded to the "counter-Revolution" that stripped away these new rights after Reconstruction. This lecture and the reception that will follow will be free and open to the public. This program is also the keynote address for the MHS conference Massachusetts and the Civil War: The Commonwealth and National Disunion.

details
Public Program Defiant Brides of the American Revolution 10 April 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 PM Nancy Rubin Stuart Part of the "New Books/New Looks: Revisiting the Past" series How did the marriages to Benedict Arnold and Henry Knox change the lives and personal development of ...

How did the marriages to Benedict Arnold and Henry Knox change the lives and personal development of their brides, Peggy Shippen and Lucy Knox? Nancy Rubin Stuart’s talk reveals the contradictory paths two young women followed subsequent to their passionate marriages to patriotic men during the American Revolution and the early Federal era. Using historical correspondence and historical drawings and portraits, Ms. Stuart will shed light on how these defiant brides affected the course of the Revolution. Ms. Stuart is an award-winning author and journalist who specializes in women and social history.

Reservations requested. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0560 / education@masshist.org.

details
Special Event, Member Event Historical Happy Hour 10 April 2013.Wednesday, 7:30PM - 8:30PM Special event for MHS Associate Members MHS Associate Members are invited to the second Historical Happy Hour. Following the talk by Nancy ...

MHS Associate Members are invited to the second Historical Happy Hour. Following the talk by Nancy Rubin Stuartwe will continue the conversation while enjoying a cocktail at The Back Bay Social Club located at 867 Boylston Street.

Associate Members and their guests will receive priority admission to the program as well as complimentary appetizers and a drink at the Happy Hour. A cash bar will also be available. The program is open to the public, but the Historical Happy Hour is only for Associate Members and their guests.

Registration is required. Please contact Katy Capó at 617-646-0518 with any questions. 


Evening Lecture

Defiant Brides of the American Revolution
6:00 PM
Nancy Rubin Stuart

How did the marriages to Benedict Arnold and Henry Knox change the lives and personal development of their brides, Peggy Shippen and Lucy Knox? Nancy Rubin Stuart’s talk reveals the contradictory paths two young women followed subsequent to their passionate marriages to patriotic men during the American Revolution and the early Federal era. Using historical correspondence and historical drawings and portraits, Ms. Stuart will shed light on how these defiant brides affected the course of the Revolution. Ms. Stuart is an award-winning author and journalist who specializes in women and social history.

details
Public Program “You Know I Dislike Slavery”: Lincoln before the Presidency 12 April 2013.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Exhibition Spotlight Elaine Grublin, Massachusetts Historical Society Focusing on the text of the August 1855 letter Lincoln wrote to his friend Joshua Fry Speed, Elaine ...

Focusing on the text of the August 1855 letter Lincoln wrote to his friend Joshua Fry Speed, Elaine Grublin, MHS Head of Reader Services, will discuss Lincoln’s early thoughts on slavery in America and his reaction to the rise of the American (“Know-Nothing”) Party.

details
Special Event Bus Trip to the Museum of World War II 26 April 2013.Friday, 11:00AM - 5:00PM Special event for Members of the MHS Fund Paine through Adams Circles This special event is open to Members of the MHS Fund Paine through Adams Circles. Enjoy a special ...

This special event is open to Members of the MHS Fund Paine through Adams Circles. Enjoy a special lunch and behind-the-scenes tour of the Museum of World War II with Founder and Director Kenneth Rendell. The museum houses the most comprehensive collection of WWII artifacts on display anywhere in the world. A bus will leave from the MHS at 11 AM and return by 5 PM.  Space is limited. RSVP required. Fee: $50. Part of the MHS Local Travel Series.

For more information or to register, contact Katy Capó at kcapo@masshist.org or 617-646-0518.

details
Public Program Authors & Abolitionists 28 April 2013.Sunday, 2:00PM - 4:30PM Please RSVP   Location: Concord, Mass. Jayne Gordon, Massachusetts Historical Society Slavery was the great social and moral issue of the 19th century, and Concord was a hotbed of ...

Slavery was the great social and moral issue of the 19th century, and Concord was a hotbed of abolitionist sentiment. Residents Emerson, Thoreau, and the Alcotts confronted slavery head-on in their writings and actions, as indignation turned to outrage. This leisurely two-mile walking tour explores the involvement of these authors and their neighbors in antislavery efforts in Concord and beyond. It begins and ends at the Concord train depot (an easy ride out from Boston and Cambridge) and is coordinated with the Sunday train schedule. Walk leader Jayne Gordon, MHS Director of Education and Public Programs, is a resident of Concord who has worked at most of the town’s historic sites. She teaches the Concord history course required for all town guides.

Registration Required. Fee $25/$15 (F/M); Free for MHS Fund Giving Circle members. Light refreshments included. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 508-577-4599 / education@masshist.org.

details
More events
Public Program Walking the Great Beach with a Volume of the MHS "Collections" in Hand 6 March 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 PM Peter Drummey, Massachusetts Historical Society Part of "The Object of History" series

In Cape Cod, Henry David Thoreau describes using an early MHS publication as a sort of antiquarian travel guide -- a way of looking back on the landscape he traversed as it had been described almost 50 years earlier. What did the founders of the MHS set out to print and what have later generations made of our early publications?

The Object of History
A series of chats with MHS Librarian Peter Drummey about what documents and artifacts from the collections can tell us about the characters, events, and issues of the past, as well as the role of MHS in documenting the rich history of our state and nation.

Registration Required. Fee $25/$15 (F/M); Free for MHS Fund Giving Circle members. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0557 / education@masshist.org.

Register for all three programs in “The Object of History” series and receive a registration discount! Series fee: $60/30 (F/M); Free for MHS Fund Circle members.

close
Public Program An Evening with Margaret Fuller in Italy 13 March 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  registration closed This event is SOLD OUT. Megan Marshall and Newpoli Part of the "New Books/New Looks: Revisiting the Past" series

Prize-winning author and MHS Fellow Megan Marshall will read from Margaret Fuller: A New American Life, her biography of the 19th-century heroine who spent her last years in Rome and Florence as a war correspondent covering the early stages of Italy’s Risorgimento. How should we remember this period in Fuller’s life, particularly given the scandal of her love affair with Giovanni Ossoli? Folk ensemble Newpoli will conjure the vibrant music that Fuller came to love as emblematic of Italy. Ms. Marshall is the author of The Peabody Sisters: Three Women Who Ignited American Romanticism, winner of the Francis Parkman Prize, the Mark Lynton History Prize, the Massachusetts Book Award, and a Pulitzer Prize finalist. Newpoli performs southern Italian folk music from the Middle Ages to the 19th century.

Reservations requested. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0560 / education@masshist.org.

close
Public Program “Our Fanaticism”: Garrison’s Antislavery Banners 15 March 2013.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM this event is free Exhibition Spotlight Anne Bentley, Massachusetts Historical Society

Curator of Art Anne Bentley will examine the nature and use of our set of William Lloyd Garrison’s banners, displayed circa 1840s to 1850s in local fairs and demonstrations sponsored by the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society.

close
Public Program Writing with Scissors: 19th-Century Activists & Their Scrapbooks 27 March 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 PM Ellen Gruber Garvey, New Jersey City University Part of the "New Books/New Looks: Revisiting the Past" series Writing with Scissors

Writing with ScissorsMen and women 150 years ago grappled with information overload by making scrapbooks—the ancestors of Google and blogging. Mark Twain and Susan B. Anthony, abolitionists and Confederates, African American janitors and farmwomen cut out and pasted down their reading. Professor Garvey will discuss these various perspectives, covered in her recent book Writing with Scissors, including the findings she uncovered while doing research at the MHS. All scrapbook makers passed along their understanding that the press was not a simple record, but a set of voices and conversations.

Reservations requested. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0560 / education@masshist.org.

close
Public Program Massachusetts and the Civil War in Black and White: The Commonwealth’s Role in Secession, Emancipation, and Reconstruction 4 April 2013.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost John Stauffer, Harvard University

Prof. Stauffer is a member of Harvard’s English Department and the chair of the university’s graduate program on the History of American Civilization. He will speak on the contribution of the Bay State’s black and white abolitionists and political leaders to secession, freedom, and equality under the law. He will also discuss briefly how the state responded to the "counter-Revolution" that stripped away these new rights after Reconstruction. This lecture and the reception that will follow will be free and open to the public. This program is also the keynote address for the MHS conference Massachusetts and the Civil War: The Commonwealth and National Disunion.

close
Public Program Defiant Brides of the American Revolution 10 April 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 PM Nancy Rubin Stuart Part of the "New Books/New Looks: Revisiting the Past" series

How did the marriages to Benedict Arnold and Henry Knox change the lives and personal development of their brides, Peggy Shippen and Lucy Knox? Nancy Rubin Stuart’s talk reveals the contradictory paths two young women followed subsequent to their passionate marriages to patriotic men during the American Revolution and the early Federal era. Using historical correspondence and historical drawings and portraits, Ms. Stuart will shed light on how these defiant brides affected the course of the Revolution. Ms. Stuart is an award-winning author and journalist who specializes in women and social history.

Reservations requested. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0560 / education@masshist.org.

close
Special Event, Member Event Historical Happy Hour 10 April 2013.Wednesday, 7:30PM - 8:30PM registration required at no cost Special event for MHS Associate Members

MHS Associate Members are invited to the second Historical Happy Hour. Following the talk by Nancy Rubin Stuartwe will continue the conversation while enjoying a cocktail at The Back Bay Social Club located at 867 Boylston Street.

Associate Members and their guests will receive priority admission to the program as well as complimentary appetizers and a drink at the Happy Hour. A cash bar will also be available. The program is open to the public, but the Historical Happy Hour is only for Associate Members and their guests.

Registration is required. Please contact Katy Capó at 617-646-0518 with any questions. 


Evening Lecture

Defiant Brides of the American Revolution
6:00 PM
Nancy Rubin Stuart

How did the marriages to Benedict Arnold and Henry Knox change the lives and personal development of their brides, Peggy Shippen and Lucy Knox? Nancy Rubin Stuart’s talk reveals the contradictory paths two young women followed subsequent to their passionate marriages to patriotic men during the American Revolution and the early Federal era. Using historical correspondence and historical drawings and portraits, Ms. Stuart will shed light on how these defiant brides affected the course of the Revolution. Ms. Stuart is an award-winning author and journalist who specializes in women and social history.

close
Public Program “You Know I Dislike Slavery”: Lincoln before the Presidency 12 April 2013.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM this event is free Exhibition Spotlight Elaine Grublin, Massachusetts Historical Society

Focusing on the text of the August 1855 letter Lincoln wrote to his friend Joshua Fry Speed, Elaine Grublin, MHS Head of Reader Services, will discuss Lincoln’s early thoughts on slavery in America and his reaction to the rise of the American (“Know-Nothing”) Party.

close
Special Event Bus Trip to the Museum of World War II 26 April 2013.Friday, 11:00AM - 5:00PM registration required Special event for Members of the MHS Fund Paine through Adams Circles

This special event is open to Members of the MHS Fund Paine through Adams Circles. Enjoy a special lunch and behind-the-scenes tour of the Museum of World War II with Founder and Director Kenneth Rendell. The museum houses the most comprehensive collection of WWII artifacts on display anywhere in the world. A bus will leave from the MHS at 11 AM and return by 5 PM.  Space is limited. RSVP required. Fee: $50. Part of the MHS Local Travel Series.

For more information or to register, contact Katy Capó at kcapo@masshist.org or 617-646-0518.

close
Public Program Authors & Abolitionists 28 April 2013.Sunday, 2:00PM - 4:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Location: Concord, Mass. Jayne Gordon, Massachusetts Historical Society

Slavery was the great social and moral issue of the 19th century, and Concord was a hotbed of abolitionist sentiment. Residents Emerson, Thoreau, and the Alcotts confronted slavery head-on in their writings and actions, as indignation turned to outrage. This leisurely two-mile walking tour explores the involvement of these authors and their neighbors in antislavery efforts in Concord and beyond. It begins and ends at the Concord train depot (an easy ride out from Boston and Cambridge) and is coordinated with the Sunday train schedule. Walk leader Jayne Gordon, MHS Director of Education and Public Programs, is a resident of Concord who has worked at most of the town’s historic sites. She teaches the Concord history course required for all town guides.

Registration Required. Fee $25/$15 (F/M); Free for MHS Fund Giving Circle members. Light refreshments included. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 508-577-4599 / education@masshist.org.

close

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