This Month at the MHS

Exhibition

Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country

Massachusetts Women in WWI. 12 June 2014 to 24 January 2015

Details
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            • Walking Tour, Public ProgramCreated Equal
              Walking Tour, Public ProgramCreated Equal: Walking Tour of Boston Black Heritage Trail
              10:00AM - 12:00PM Boston African American National Historic Site registration required at no cost details
            • MHS TourMHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS
              MHS TourMHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS
              10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free details
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                  • Public Program, Brown BagLouisa Catherine Adams
                    Public Program, Brown BagLouisa Catherine Adams: One Woman, Many Voices
                    12:00PM - 1:00PM Moderator: Beth Luey Panelists: Judith Graham, Margaret Hogan, David Michelmore this event is free details
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                                    Exhibition Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial 21 February 2014 to 23 May 2014 this event is free Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington


                                    In commemoration of the Civil War battle of Fort Wagner led by Colonel Robert Gould Shaw and the men of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment and in cooperation with the Massachusetts Historical Society, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. has organized the exhibition Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ Shaw Memorial.

                                    The exhibition celebrates Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ magisterial Shaw Memorial (1883–1900). When Saint-Gaudens created the monument, he based his likeness of Shaw on photographs of the colonel, but for his depiction of the other soldiers, he hired African American men to pose in his studio. This exhibition seeks to make real the soldiers of the 54th represented anonymously in the memorial. It brings together vintage photographic portraits of members of the regiment and of the men and women who recruited, nursed, taught, and guided them.

                                    Throughout the run of the exhibition special programs are planned in cooperation with the Museum of African American History, the Boston African American National Historic Site, the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment Company A, and the Friends of the Public Garden.

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                                    Early American History Seminar Through Novanglus’s Eyes: Forms of Empire in India 6 May 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                    Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                    Hari Vishwanadha, Santa Monica College Comment: Eliga H. Gould, University of New Hampshire

                                    Yankee merchants in the India trade successfully negotiated the competing claims of Indian society and the British Raj. As the empire flourished, the merchants prospered. The experiences of two prominent men, Henry Lee and Charles Eliot Norton, are representative of the rich and complex relationship among the three peoples and their cultures and served as a template for subsequent merchants engaged in the India trade during the nineteenth century.

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                                    Notice Library Closing @ 2:30 PM 7 May 2014.Wednesday, all day close
                                    Brown Bag The Poor Always with You: Poverty in an Age of Emancipation, 1833-1879 7 May 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Chris Florio, Princeton University

                                    Poverty and slavery are monumental problems – but today we assume they are separate problems. In the mid-nineteenth century, however, American and British observers struggled to distinguish the poor from the slave. Tracing a key shift in the moral imagination, my dissertation explores how the boundaries of poverty and slavery blurred during the so-called “age of emancipation.” I ask: how did poverty and slavery, as political categories and social conditions, entangle with one another in locations spanning the United States and the British Empire?

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                                    Member Event, Special Event John F. Kennedy Medal Presentation 7 May 2014.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 7:00PM registration required at no cost SOLD OUT

                                    The event is sold out. If you would like to be placed on the waiting list, please call 617-646-0552.

                                    MHS Fellows and Members are invited to attend the presentation of The John F. Kennedy Medal to David McCullough.

                                    5:30 PM: reception

                                    6:00 PM: presentation of the medal with remarks by David McCullough

                                    Seating is limited.

                                    Kennedy Medal

                                     

                                     

                                     

                                     

                                     

                                     

                                    The John F. Kennedy Medal is awarded by the Massachusetts Historical Society to persons who have rendered distinguished service to the cause of history. It is not limited to any field of history or to any particular kind of service to history.

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                                    Public Program The Adams Portraits & Other Treats: 18th-Century Artist Benjamin Blyth 8 May 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm Bettina A. Norton

                                    Benjamin Blyth, the Salem artist of the Society’s iconic portraits of John and Abigail Adams, also left a large, delightful number of other portraits of local families, merchants, and participants in the American Revolution. His brother Samuel, a jack-of-all trades in the construction and home-decorating trades, was far more successful. But because of Benjamin’s flight from Salem to Virginia in 1782, he and his brother seemed to swap careers. Therein lies the tale.

                                    Bettina A. Norton is a retired museum professional. She has published widely in her field, American historical prints. In later years, she was editor and publisher of The Beacon Hill Chronicle and is currently Editor Emerita of the Boston Musical Intelligencer. She is author of Edwin Whitefield: Nineteenth-Century North American Scenery; History of the Boston Naval Shipyard, 1800-1974; Trinity Church: The Story of an Episcopal Parish in the City of Boston; ‘To Create and Foster Architecture: History of the Boston Architectural Center; Prints at the Essex Institute; and over 60 articles on American graphic arts, architecture, and social history. She has lived with her family in a house on Beacon Hill since 1941, and in 1967 she founded Hill House, its community center.

                                    To Reserve: Click here to register online, or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

                                    Image: Abigail Adams. Portrait, pastel on paper by Benjamin Blyth, circa 1766.

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                                    Brown Bag Classroom Currents: Childhood Education Reforms in Nineteenth-Century Boston and Buenos Aires 9 May 2014.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Carolina Zumaglini, Florida International University

                                    This project traces the origins and evolution of nineteenth-century public educational theories and their significance to nation-building processes within the Americas. Focusing on the Atlantic seaboard cities of Boston in the United States and Buenos Aires in Argentina as case studies, it analyzes how educational ideas traveled and were reshaped by local conditions. The similarities in the nature and scope—and ultimately, the differences in the implementation—of educational policies in each city supports a larger analysis on the transformation of politics and the shaping of distinct national identities in the nineteenth-century Americas.

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                                    Walking Tour, Public Program Created Equal: Walking Tour of Boston Black Heritage Trail 10 May 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 12:00PM registration required at no cost Boston African American National Historic Site

                                    Series participants are invited on a walking tour of Boston’s Black Heritage Trail offered in conjunction with the Created Equal Film & Discussion Series. The tour is presented by our partner organization, Boston African American National Historic Site.

                                    For more information, please call 617-646-0557 or e-mail education@masshist.org.

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                                    MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 10 May 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

                                    Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

                                    The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

                                    Free and open to the public.

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                                    Brown Bag The Performance of Miracles: Alexander Graham Bell's Mission to Save the Deaf 12 May 2014.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Katie Booth, University of Pittsburgh

                                    Alexander Graham Bell believed that his most important contribution was not the telephone, but his work to liberate the deaf by destroying their community. He came to Boston in 1871 to teach deaf children through oralism, a method that forbade the use of Sign Language and instead taught deaf children to speak. He quickly became an international leader of the oralist movement, but for the deaf who believed he was robbing them of their language, he became the culture’s greatest enemy.

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                                    Public Program, Special Event An Historical Look at the Goodridge Same Sex Marriage Decision 15 May 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm Chief Justice Margaret H. Marshall

                                    Same-sex marriage in Massachusetts began on May 17, 2004, as a result of the ruling in Goodridge v. Department of Public Health, which stated that it was unconstitutional under the Massachusetts Constitution to allow only opposite-sex couples to marry. Chief Justice Marshall will talk about this landmark decision.

                                    Chief Justice Marshall is a former Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, having retired from the Court in December 2010. Appointed to the position in 1999 by Governor A. Paul Cellucci, Chief Justice Marshall was the first woman to serve as Chief Justice, and the second woman appointed to serve as an Associate Justice in the Court's then three hundred and four year history when she was first appointed to the bench in 1996 by Governor William F. Weld.

                                    To Reserve: There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Click here to register online, or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

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                                    Public Program, Brown Bag Louisa Catherine Adams: One Woman, Many Voices 16 May 2014.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Moderator: Beth Luey Panelists: Judith Graham, Margaret Hogan, David Michelmore

                                    Louisa Catherine Adams wrote in several genres, including letters, diaries, poetry, and memoirs. Bring your lunch and join us for a conversation with the editors who have prepared her work for publication, and a biographer who has used it. They will discuss what we can learn about Louisa by listening to her different voices.

                                    To Reserve: This event is free and open to the public.

                                    Image: Louisa Catherine Johnson. Miniature oil portrait, circa 1792.

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                                    MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 17 May 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

                                    Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

                                    The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

                                    Free and open to the public.

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                                    Brown Bag Postponed:
                                    POSTPONED - NEW DATE TBA Securing the Spanish Main: British Subjecthood and the Peace of 1763
                                    21 May 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Bryan Rosenblithe, Columbia University

                                    This talk examines the ways that political, economic, and military contests in the Floridas and Honduras during the era of the Seven Years War shaped imperial notions of British subjecthood. It also explores how questions related to who counted as a subject influenced British strategic thinking during a time of widely perceived Bourbon revanchism.  

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                                    Public Program Celebrating the 90th Anniversary of the U.S. Foreign Service 23 May 2014.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free HdG, Dna. Maria St. Catherine McConnell

                                    Bring your lunch and join us as we celebrate the 90th Anniversary of the 1924 U.S. Foreign Service Act ("The Rogers Act"), which created the US Foreign Service. We will explore the role of Massachusetts statesmen and diplomats in establishing the U.S. Foreign Service and in pioneering America's diplomatic history and tradition. The Rogers Act was authored by Massachusetts Congressman, John Jacob Rogers (1912-1925) of Lowell, Massachusetts, supported in the US Senate by Henry Cabot Lodge, Chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee (1893-1924), and signed into law by former Massachusetts Governor, President Calvin Coolidge (1923-1929). Men from Massachusetts have also played important roles in America's diplomatic corps, from Boston-born American envoy Benjamin Franklin (America's first diplomat at the father of American diplomacy) to our current Secretary of State, former Massachusetts Senator John Kerry.

                                    HdG, Dna. Maria St. Catherine McConnell is a U.S.-, U.N.-, Vatican-trained & Oxford-educated diplomatic scholar formerly with The American Academy of Diplomacy, and a member of the American Foreign Service Association. She heads the Franklin-Rogers MA Public Commission on American Diplomacy & The U.S. Foreign Service, whose mission includes the promotion of knowledge and appreciation of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as "the birth-state of American diplomacy."

                                    Reservation requested: (617) 646-0557 or education@masshist.

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                                    Library Closed Memorial Day 24 May 2014.Saturday, all day

                                    The library at the MHS is closed for the Memorial Day weekend.

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                                    Building Closed Memorial Day 26 May 2014.Monday, all day

                                    The MHS is closed for Memorial Day.

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                                    Brown Bag Circulating Counterfeits: Making Money and Its Meanings in the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic 28 May 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Katherine Smoak, The Johns Hopkins University

                                    Counterfeiting was a ubiquitous problem in the eighteenth-century British Atlantic, encouraged by the unstandardized and various nature of eighteenth-century currency. Counterfeiters formed regional and trans-Atlantic networks to produce and circulate debased and forged coin, both British and foreign, and faked reproductions of newly available paper notes.  Reconstructing these networks, I argue that counterfeiters shaped imperial economies in unexpected ways, impacting everything from daily economic practices to the course of economic development, and prompted complex discussions about value, worth and trust in an expanding commercial empire.

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                                    Public Program, Author Talk The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941–1942 28 May 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm Nigel Hamilton

                                    Based on years of archival research and interviews with the last surviving aides and Roosevelt family members, Nigel Hamilton offers a definitive account of FDR’s masterful—and underappreciated—command of the Allied war effort. Hamilton takes readers inside FDR’s White House Oval Study—his personal command center—and into the meetings where he battled with Churchill about strategy and tactics and overrode the near mutinies of his own generals and secretary of war.

                                    Time and again, FDR was proven right and his allies and generals were wrong. When the generals wanted to attack the Nazi-fortified coast of France, FDR knew the Allied forces weren’t ready. When Churchill insisted his Far East colonies were loyal and would resist the Japanese, Roosevelt knew it was a fantasy. As Hamilton’s account reaches its climax with the Torch landings in North Africa in late 1942, the tide of war turns in the Allies’ favor and FDR’s genius for psychology and military affairs is clear.

                                    Nigel Hamilton is a bestselling and award-winning biographer of President John F. Kennedy, General Bernard “Monty” Montgomery, and President Bill Clinton, among other subjects. He is a Senior Fellow in the McCormack Graduate School, University of Massachusetts-Boston, and first president of the Biographers International Organization (BIO).

                                    To Reserve: There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Click here to register online, or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

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