This Month at the MHS

Exhibition

Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country

Massachusetts Women in WWI. 12 June 2014 to 24 January 2015

Details
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October 2014

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      • Member Event, Special EventHistory Revealed: Thomas Hutchinson and the Stamp Act Riots
        Member Event, Special EventHistory Revealed: Thomas Hutchinson and the Stamp Act Riots
        6:00PM - 7:30PM THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT. If you would like to be placed on the waiting list, please call 617-646-0518. registration required at no cost details
      • Public Program, Author Talk1914-1918: The War Within the War
        Public Program, Author Talk1914-1918: The War Within the War
        6:00PM - 7:30PM Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Adam Hochschild, University of California Berkeley Please RSVP   registration required details
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                            • Brown BagThe Power of Women’s Words in Puritan New England: Gossip, Rumor,...
                              Brown BagThe Power of Women’s Words in Puritan New England: Gossip, Rumor, and Reputation in a Culture of Surveillance
                              12:00PM - 1:00PM Melissa Johnson, University of Michigan this event is free details
                            • Public Program, Special EventHonoring Pauline Maier (1938–2013)
                              Public Program, Special EventHonoring Pauline Maier (1938–2013)
                              5:30PM - 7:30PM The evening will begin with a reception at 5:30, followed by the talk at 6:00 Gordon S. Wood, Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus, Brown University Please RSVP   registration required at no cost details
                                Exhibition Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in the First World War 12 June 2014 to 24 January 2015 this event is free Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Hall at Ecury

                                To commemorate the centennial of the outbreak of World War I, the MHS has organized the exhibition Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in the First World War focusing on two of the hundreds of women from the Commonwealth who went to France as members of the U.S. armed forces, the Red Cross, and other war relief organizations.

                                From the Society’s extraordinary collection of women’s recollections, this exhibition features photographs, letters, diaries, and memorabilia related to Margaret Hall and Eleanor (Nora) Saltonstall, Red Cross volunteers in France. The exhibition will highlight Hall’s large-format photographs of the battlefront on loan from the Cohasset Historical Society. Both women were keen observers of the climactic months of the war and depicted what they witnessed in vivid detail.

                                The exhibition celebrates the forthcoming MHS publication Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: The World War I Memoir of Margaret Hall.

                                You can view all of the photographs from Margaret Hall's memoir on our companion website.

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                                Brown Bag Reading Locke on the Plantation 1 October 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Sean Moore, University of New Hampshire

                                This talk will extend into book history Edmund Morgan’s articulation of the well-known paradox that some early Americans were asserting their own desire for freedom from Britain while simultaneously enslaving others. Considering Locke’s political theory, it will examine how the African diaspora underwrote the dissemination of books of British literature and philosophy, and how Jefferson, Washington, and others bartered slave-produced goods for books through the London agents with whom they did business.

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                                Public Program, Author Talk The Trials of Old New England Towns in a New Nation 1 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Mary Fuhrer, Independent Scholar

                                Mary White, circa 1840. Courtesy Boylston Historical Society.We tend to think of New England towns in the first decades of the 19th century as peaceful, bucolic havens -- they were not. In this talk, Mary Babson Fuhrer will discuss the remarkable stories of conflict and transformation that reshaped local communities in the decades leading up to the Civil War. As people struggled to work out the promises of the Revolution on the personal level, contrary ideals of community identity and individual interests clashed, until, as one observer noted, "the most malignant passions of our depraved natures raged." The diaries, letters, and account books she draws on form the basis of her recent book, Crisis of Community: Trials and Transformation of a New England Town, 1815-1848.

                                Mary Babson Fuhrer is a public historian and independent scholar who lives in Littleton, Mass. Fuhrer provides research, interpretation, and programs for humanities associations, museums, historical societies, and educational institutions. She specializes in using primary sources to recover everyday lives from the past. Her scholarship has received generous support from the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, the Massachusetts Historical Society, the American Antiquarian Society, and the New England Regional Fellowship Consortium. Fuhrer was recently awarded the Massachusetts History Commendation for 2014 by the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities. She is currently pursuing research on the illness narratives of consumptives (tubercular patients) across gender, class, ethnicity, and race in antebellum New England.

                                There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

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                                History of Women and Gender Seminar Enslaved Women and the Politics of Self-Liberation in Revolutionary North America 2 October 2014.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                Location: Schlesinger Library Barbara Krauthamer, University of Massachusetts - Amherst Comment: Kate Masur, Northwestern University

                                This paper examines enslaved women's strategies for gaining freedom through escape. It focuses on enslaved women's escapes from bondage and their concomitant movements to various sites in the Americas from the Revolutionary era through the early decades of the nineteenth century. It also considers the ways in which both enslaved women and slaveholders made sense of the changing political landscape in the late eighteenth-century British Atlantic and African Diaspora.

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                                MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 4 October 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

                                The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

                                While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in World War I."

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                                Public Program Katherine, Grace, and Mary: Archaeological Revelations of 17th and 18th Century Women from Boston's Big Dig 6 October 2014.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Joe Bagley, Boston City Archaeologist

                                A mid-18th century porringer pot by Grace Parker found at the Three Cranes TavernThe archaeological surveys conducted prior to the beginning of Boston's infamous Big Dig resulted in the uncovering of mountains of historical data on Boston's deep history.  Three archaeological sites stand out for their contributions to Women's history in Boston. These include the late 17th century site of Katherine Nanny Naylor, the early 18th century site of Mary Long, and the mid-18th century site of Grace Parker.  Katherine was the first woman to legally divorce her husband in Puritan Massachusetts, Mary was the operator of the Three Cranes Tavern in Charlestown---the cultural and physical heart of the Charlestown community, and Grace owned and operated the most successful ceramic business in Boston producing wears with her distinctive brush strokes.  Together, these three women paint a complicated and nuanced history of Boston that goes far beyond what is typically known or written about women in these periods.  Join City Archaeologist Joe Bagley as he discusses the information uncovered about these three women and their contributions to the history and culture of Boston.

                                Joe Bagley is the City Archaeologist of Boston.  As a City employee, Joe executed archaeological surveys on city-owned land, reviewed construction and development projects that could impact archaeological sites, and promotes Boston's archaeology through public events and talks.  Joe received his BA in Archaeology from Boston University and his MA in Historical Archaeology from UMass Boston.  He has been conducting archaeological surveys in New England on historic and Native sites for over a dozen years.  He is also the live-in caretaker of the Dorchester Historical Society's William Clapp House where he lives with his wife Jen and his dog, Jack.

                                There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

                                http://www.cityofboston.gov/archaeology/

                                https://www.facebook.com/BostonArchaeologyProgram

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                                Early American History Seminar Thomas Jefferson, Lawyer: Property and Personhood in the Law of Slavery 7 October 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                David Konig, Washington University in St. Louis Comment: Malick Ghachem, MIT

                                This paper analyzes the complex relationship between Thomas Jefferson’s legal career and his ownership of slaves. Jefferson used the law to manage people as his property, but he never repudiated their essential personhood. The governmental structure of the day made open political assault on slavery inconceivable, but Jefferson as a lawyer was able to use the legal system to mitigate its harshest features and to lay the foundation for an expanded antislavery jurisprudence in the future.

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                                Member Event, Special Event History Revealed: Thomas Hutchinson and the Stamp Act Riots 8 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM registration required at no cost THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT. If you would like to be placed on the waiting list, please call 617-646-0518. Thomas Hutchinson

                                MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special evening at the Society as John W. Tyler, editor of The Correspondence of Thomas Hutchinson: 1740-1766 (2014), relays the story of Lt. Gov. Thomas Hutchinson and how he came to be on the losing side of the American Revolution. His house was destroyed by a mob during the Stamp Act riots, a milestone in the series of acts of civil disobedience that made Boston notorious in the eyes of the British government. A pair of fire tongs salvaged from that evening and now in the collections of the MHS will be on display along with other objects related to Hutchinson and the coming of the American Revolution.

                                6:00 PM: Reception
                                6:30 PM: Remarks by John W. Tyler followed by a presentation of items from the Society's collections

                                Become a Member today!

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                                Public Program, Author Talk 1914-1918: The War Within the War 9 October 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Adam Hochschild, University of California Berkeley

                                As we mark the centenary of the First World War, this epochal event is usually remembered as a bloody conflict between rival alliances of nations. But there was another struggle within most of those countries: between people who regarded the war as a noble and necessary crusade, and a brave minority who felt it was tragic madness and who refused to fight. Writer Adam Hochschild describes this battle in an illustrated talk, focusing on the country where that tension was sharpest, Great Britain.

                                Adam HochschildAdam Hochschild’s writing has focused on human rights and social justice. His seven books include King Leopold's Ghost: a Story of Greed, Terror and Heroism in Colonial Africa, which won a J. Anthony Lukas award in the United States, and the Duff Cooper Prize in England. Bury the Chains: Prophets and Rebels in the Fight to Free an Empire’s Slaves was a finalist for the 2005 National Book Award and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. His To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 won the Dayton Literary Peace Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. For the body of his work, he has received awards from the Lannan Foundation, the American Historical Association, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He teaches at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley.

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                                Special Event, Public Program, Notice MHS Open House - Galleries Open 13 October 2014.Monday, 10:00AM - 3:00PM

                                Join us as part of Opening Our Doors, Boston’s largest single day of free arts and cultural events. Stop by to view Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in the First World War. This event is free and open to the public.

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                                Library Closed, Special Event Columbus Day 13 October 2014.Monday, all day

                                The MHS library is closed on Columbus Day. The exhibition galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM.

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                                Environmental History Seminar Finding Meaning and Debating Value in a Historical Landscape 14 October 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                David Benac, Western Michigan University Victoria Cain, Northeastern University

                                Rural Oregon has shifted from an emphasis on resource extraction to a reliance on ecotourism.  This transition exacerbated a clash of opposing visions of the value of history and the natural world. Competing interpretations of landscape as a resource or as a haven is an old dichotomy in environmental history. This paper adds nuance by employing a third category that intermingles the others: historical significance.

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                                Brown Bag The Role of the Military within Imperial Security Policy, 1685-1689. 15 October 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Rachael Abbiss, University of Chester

                                The Dominion of New England was established in 1686 by James VII & II. James’s colonial policy was the first substantial attempt to unite colonies under royal military authority and permanently station regular soldiers in New England. There is limited research pertaining to the military purpose of James’s imperial design, in particular the role, function and contribution of regular troops in controlling and securing New England. This project examines the army and military policy in North America between 1686 and 1689. 

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                                Public Program Rebels in Vermont!: The St. Albans Raid 15 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm J. Kevin Graffagnino, William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan

                                Orleans County broadsideOn October 19, 1864, twenty-two Confederate soldiers under the command of Bennett H. Young attacked the village of St. Albans, Vermont.  They robbed the banks in town, tried to set fire to the downtown commercial district, shot and killed one person, and then fled north to Canada with $227,000 in their saddlebags.  The St. Albans Raid sent shock waves throughout the North.  A fraction of the stolen money made its way back to St. Albans, but a series of Canadian trials ended in the dismissal of all charges against Young and his men.  Kevin Graffagnino's "Rebels in Vermont!" presentation details the events of the raid and also looks at the lives and careers of the Confederate participants, providing more of a Southern perspective than most Northern versions of the story.

                                J. Kevin Graffagnino is Director of the William L. Clements Library of early American history at the University of Michigan.  In a long career, Kevin has been an antiquarian book dealer, special collections curator, library administrator, and Executive Director of the Vermont and Kentucky state historical societies.  He holds two degrees from the University of Vermont and a Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.  Kevin's publications on early American history and bibliophilic topics include 17 books, the most recent of which is The Vermont Difference: Perspectives from the Green Mountain State (2014)

                                There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

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                                MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 18 October 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

                                The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

                                While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in World War I."

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                                Public Program, Author Talk Civil War Boston 21 October 2014.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Barbara Berenson

                                Boston and the Civil War book coverBoston’s black and white abolitionists forged a second American revolution dedicated to ending slavery and honoring the promise of liberty made in the Declaration of Independence. Before the war, Bostonians were bitterly divided between those who supported the Union and those opposed to its endorsement of slavery. The Fugitive Slave Act brought the horrors of slavery close to home and led many to join the abolitionists. March to war with Boston’s brave soldiers, including the grandson of Patriot Paul Revere and the Fighting Irish. The all-black Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Regiment battled against both slavery and discrimination, while Boston’s women fought tirelessly against slavery and for their own right to be full citizens of the Union. Join local historian and author Barbara F. Berenson on a thrilling and memorable journey through Civil War Boston. 

                                Barbara F. Berenson is the author of Walking Tours of Civil War Boston: Hub of Abolitionism (2011, 2nd ed. 2014) and co-editor of Breaking Barriers: The Unfinished Story of Women Lawyers and Judges in Massachusetts (2012). A graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School, Barbara works as a senior attorney at the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court.

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                                Early American History Seminar Popular U.S. Enthusiasm for Latin American Independence, 1810-1825 21 October 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                Caitlin A. Fitz, Northwestern University Comment: John Bezis-Selfa, Wheaton College

                                This paper explores the reactions of those in the United States to the independence movements of Latin American nations in the 1800s. In general, U.S. observers were overjoyed by these movements; however, Massachusetts citizens were less thrilled. This presentation will analyze the national trend and the commonwealth’s deviation from it.

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                                Exhibition The Father of His Country Returns to Boston, October 24, 1789 24 October 2014 to 31 December 2014 this event is free Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM George Washington portrait by Gullager

                                Two hundred twenty-five years ago, during his first year in office, President George Washington embarked on a month-long tour of New England. Young John Quincy Adams observed the great excitement of people everywhere:

                                At the present moment they indulge themselves in sentiments of joy, arising/resulting . . . from the gratification of their affection in beholding personally among them, the friend, the benefactor, the father of his Country.

                                In Boston the president was met by a great procession that paraded beneath a triumphal arch designed by Charles Bulfinch. The MHS holds six portraits of Washington, including a life study by Christian Gullager painted during the New England tour.

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                                MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 25 October 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

                                The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

                                While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in World War I."

                                close
                                Immigration and Urban History Seminar At the Crossroads: Charros, Cowboys, and Capitalists in San Antonio, Texas 28 October 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                Laura Barraclough, Yale University Comment: Desirée J. Garcia, Arizona State University

                                This paper examines the practice of charrería (Mexican rodeo) among Mexican immigrant men in San Antonio from the late 1940s through the early 1970s. The charros claimed an active place for Mexicans in the history of the Southwest – as well as its future. At the same time, however, they reinscribed a gendered and classed vision of ethnic Mexican inclusion: one that privileged middle-class, socially conservative men while marginalizing other, more transformative visions.

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                                Brown Bag The Power of Women’s Words in Puritan New England: Gossip, Rumor, and Reputation in a Culture of Surveillance 29 October 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Melissa Johnson, University of Michigan

                                This project interrogates the role of gossip and rumor in seventeenth-century New England. It focuses on words spoken either by or about women as a way to understand both the gendered nature of reputation and the ways in which women’s words shaped a politics of knowledge in early New England. It asks how reputation reflected and defined boundaries of the community and shows that women participated actively in defining Puritan religious culture. This project mines not only the content of rumors but also the networks through which it spread. This approach uncovers the ways that women’s networks constituted alternate sites of community definition and how different kinds of information and modes of transmission were gendered as either “gossip” or “news.”

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                                Public Program, Special Event Honoring Pauline Maier (1938–2013) 29 October 2014.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost The evening will begin with a reception at 5:30, followed by the talk at 6:00 Gordon S. Wood, Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus, Brown University

                                Professor Pauline Maier’s contributions to the study of American history and to the life of the MHS were both of tremendous value to this community. A distinguished historian who authored significant works on the Revolutionary era, Maier shaped—and will continue to shape—the way generations of students and readers view the foundation of American democracy. Join us as Professor Gordon S. Wood pays tribute to a great historian, teacher, and author who was committed to making American history vivid and accessible to all.

                                Please call 617-646-0560 or click here to register.

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