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March 2015

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      • Brown BagJohn Quincy Adams and the Paradox of Anglo-American Relations in th...
        Brown BagJohn Quincy Adams and the Paradox of Anglo-American Relations in the Early Republic: The London Years, 1815-1817
        12:00PM - 1:00PM Robert Shimp, Boston University this event is free details
      • Public Program, Landscape Architecture SeriesCharles Eliot and the Modernization of Boston's Landscape
        Public Program, Landscape Architecture SeriesCharles Eliot and the Modernization of Boston's Landscape
        6:00PM - 7:00PM 6:00 program with 5:30 reception Anita Berrizbeitia, Professor of Landscape Architecture - Harvard Graduate School of Design $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members of the MHS, Mount Auburn Cemetery and the Nichols House Museum) Please RSVP   registration required details
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              • Public Program, Author Talk, Landscape Architecture SeriesThe Brookline Troika: Olmsted, Richardson, Sargent and the Planning...
                Public Program, Author Talk, Landscape Architecture SeriesThe Brookline Troika: Olmsted, Richardson, Sargent and the Planning of a “Model Community.”
                6:00PM - 7:00PM 6:00 program with 5:30 reception Keith Morgan, Director of Architectural Studies - Boston University $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members of the MHS, Mount Auburn Cemetery and the Nichols House Museum) Please RSVP   registration required details
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                      • Brown BagNetworks of Faith and Finance: Boston’s Scottish Exile Community ...
                        Brown BagNetworks of Faith and Finance: Boston’s Scottish Exile Community in the Later Seventeenth Century
                        12:00PM - 1:00PM Craig Gallagher, Boston College this event is free details
                      • Public Program, Author Talk, Landscape Architecture SeriesLandscape Architect Arthur Shurcliff
                        Public Program, Author Talk, Landscape Architecture SeriesLandscape Architect Arthur Shurcliff
                        6:00PM - 7:00PM 6:00 program with 5:30 reception Elizabeth Hope Cushing, independent author $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members of the MHS, Mount Auburn Cemetery and the Nichols House Museum) Please RSVP   registration required details
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                              • Public Program, Author Talk, Conversation, Lincoln and the Legacy of ConflictA Civil Conversation: James McPherson and Louis Masur
                                Public Program, Author Talk, Conversation, Lincoln and the Legacy of ConflictA Civil Conversation: James McPherson and Louis Masur
                                6:00PM - 7:00PM SOLD OUT! James McPherson, Princeton University; Louis Masur, Rutgers University Facilitated by Carol Bundy details
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                                    Exhibition God Save the People! From the Stamp Act to Bunker Hill 27 February 2015 to 4 September 2015 this event is free Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Boston Massacre Engraving

                                    To tell the story of the coming of the American Revolution in Boston, this exhibition follows the evolution of colonial thought and political action through the letters and diaries of men and women caught up in the conflict, together with political cartoons, newspapers, maps, artifacts, and portraits.

                                    Between 1765 and 1775, as imperial reforms encroached upon what colonists perceived to be their English liberties, Boston became a center of resistance and site of a series of spectacular events that undercut royal authority. Citizens of Massachusetts bonded together to reject the British administration over their activities and lives. Imposed customs duties and taxes -- such as the Stamp Act and Tea Act -- were successfully overturned due to well-ordered and systematic mob violence.

                                    Along with celebrated Sons and Daughters of Liberty, this is the story of forgotten patriots who died for a country-to-be, brothers who served against each other in the courtroom, propagandists and war profiteers, merchants whose enterprise was threatened by political chaos and young lovers divided by battle lines.


                                    If you are unable to visit the exhibition in person, you can explore the coming of the American Revolution through the following online displays.

                                    Perspectives of the Boston Massacre is an interactive website that allows visitors to examine materials offering a range of perspectives related to the events of 5 March 1765.

                                    The Siege of Boston presents more than one dozen accounts written by individuals personally engaged in or affected by the siege, which occurred from April 1775 to March 1776.

                                    The Annotated Newspapers of Harbottle Dorr, Jr., presents the complete four-volume set of Revolutionary-era Boston newspapers and pamphlets assembled, annotated, and indexed by Harbottle Dorr, Jr., a shopkeeper in Boston.

                                    Discover the fears, friction, and turmoil that shaped these times with The Coming of the American Revolution, a web display of newspapers, official documents, and personal correspondence arranged into fifteen key topics.

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                                    Early American History Seminar Degrees of Britishness: The People of Albany, New York, and Questions of Cultural Community Membership, 1763-1775 3 March 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                    Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                    Elizabeth M. Covart, Boston, Massachusetts Comment: Lisa Wilson, Connecticut College

                                    Following the French and Indian War, Albanians believed themselves to be British, but visiting Britons did not recognize them as fellow countrymen. New World Dutch architecture, the Albany Dutch dialect, and the Dutch Reformed Church contributed to the British view of the Albanians as inter-imperial foreigners: subjects who lived within the British empire, but stood outside of the British cultural community. This paper, drawn from Covart’s larger book project, explores the Albanians’ response, which ranged from rebuilding efforts to public protest.

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                                    Brown Bag John Quincy Adams and the Paradox of Anglo-American Relations in the Early Republic: The London Years, 1815-1817 4 March 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Robert Shimp, Boston University

                                    This talk will center on how John Quincy Adams’s experiences in London and Ealing as Minister Plenipotentiary to Great Britain came to influence his subsequent domestic career. Shimp argues that this period in Adams’s career can provide us with important insights into the paradoxical relationship that Adams and the United States maintained with Great Britain through the early national period. Such connections were significant for the second party system in the United States.

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                                    Public Program, Landscape Architecture Series Charles Eliot and the Modernization of Boston's Landscape 4 March 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   registration required 6:00 program with 5:30 reception Anita Berrizbeitia, Professor of Landscape Architecture - Harvard Graduate School of Design $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members of the MHS, Mount Auburn Cemetery and the Nichols House Museum) Landscape Architects Series

                                    Landscape Architects Series
                                    Program 1

                                    Charles Eliot was the son of Harvard President Charles William Eliot, a visionary landscape architect, and protégé of Frederick Law Olmsted. He inspired the 1891 Trustees of Public Reservations — what is now the oldest regional land trust in the world — and had a central role in shaping the Boston Metropolitan Park System. He was the guiding vision behind the transformation of the banks of Charles River in Cambridge and, although he did not live to see his plans reach fruition, his work accelerated the rescue of the Charles from a virtual sewer to one of the most picturesque features of region’s landscape. Professor Berizbeitia will talk about Eliot’s work and his legacy in landscape design.

                                    Anita Berrizbeitia is Professor of Landscape Architecture and Director of the Master in Landscape Architecture Degree Programs at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. Her research focuses on design theories of modern and contemporary landscape architecture, the productive aspects of landscapes, and Latin American cities and landscapes. Berrizbeitia has taught design theory and studio, most recently at the University of Pennsylvania School of Design, where she was Associate Chair of the Department of Landscape Architecture. Her studios investigate innovative approaches to the conceptualization of public space, especially on sites where urbanism, globalization, and local cultural conditions intersect. From 1987 to 1993, she practiced with Child Associates, Inc., in Boston, where she collaborated on many award-winning projects. She was awarded the 2005/2006 Prince Charitable Trusts Rome Prize Fellowship in Landscape Architecture. A native of Caracas, Venezuela, she studied architecture at the Universidad Simon Bolivar before receiving a BA from Wellesley College and an MLA from the GSD.


                                    Landscape Architects Series

                                    Enjoy a series of programs on some of New England’s most distinguished landscape architects. Charles Eliot and the Modernization of Boston's Landscape with Anita Berrizbeitia is the first program in the series. The Brookline Troika with Keith Morgan will take place on Wednesday, March 11 and Landscape Architect Arthur Shurcliff with Elizabeth Hope Cushing will take place on Wednesday, March 18. The Landscape Architects series has been made possible by the generous underwriting of Stephen Stimson Associates Landscape Architects and is cosponsored by the Mount Auburn Cemetery and the Nichols House Museum. 

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                                    MHS Tour History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 7 March 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

                                    The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

                                    While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, ""God Save the People!” which explores events leading up to the American Revolution."

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                                    Environmental History Seminar Fear of an Open Beach: The Privatization of the Connecticut Shore and the Fate of Coastal America 10 March 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                    Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                    Andrew W. Kahrl, University of Virginia Comment: Karl Haglund, Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation

                                    This essay traces the rise of private beaches along the Connecticut shore and the efforts of municipalities to protect exclusionary laws from the effects of civil rights movements. It argues that overdeveloped coastlines have been the product of racial and class segregation; thus, the battle over public access to the nation’s shoreline during the 1970s sheds light on the roots of the environmental crisis facing America’s coast.

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                                    Public Program, Author Talk, Landscape Architecture Series The Brookline Troika: Olmsted, Richardson, Sargent and the Planning of a “Model Community.” 11 March 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   registration required 6:00 program with 5:30 reception Keith Morgan, Director of Architectural Studies - Boston University $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members of the MHS, Mount Auburn Cemetery and the Nichols House Museum) Landscape Architects Series

                                    Landscape Architects Series
                                    Program 2

                                    Derived from the recently publish book, Community by Design:  The Olmsted Office and the Making of Brookline, Massachusetts, this lecture will explore the close and dynamic relationship of the country’s leading landscape architect, architect, and horticulturalist in the evolution of Boston’s premier suburb. These three men lived within easy walking distance of each other in the Green Hill section of Brookline and used their private residences and landscapes as teaching and professional spaces as well.  Their friendships and (occasional) conflicts informed the character of the suburban development for a community that called itself “the richest town in the world” and believed that its model was worthy of emulation.

                                    Keith N. Morgan is a Professor of the History of Art & Architecture and American & New England Studies at Boston University, where he has taught since 1980. He currently direct BU’s Architectural Studies Program and is a former national president of the Society of Architectural Historians. Written in collaboration with Elizabeth Hope Cushing and Roger Reed, Community by Design was published in 2013 by the University of Massachusetts Press for the Library of American Landscape History and received the Ruth Emery Prize of the Victorian Society in America.


                                    Landscape Architects Series

                                    Enjoy a series of programs on some of New England’s most distinguished landscape architects. The Brookline Troika is the second program in the series. Landscape Architect Arthur Shurcliff with Elizabeth Hope Cushing will take place on Wednesday, March 18. The Landscape Architects series has been made possible by the generous underwriting of Stephen Stimson Associates Landscape Architects and is cosponsored by the Mount Auburn Cemetery and the Nichols House Museum.

                                    close
                                    MHS Tour History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 14 March 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

                                    The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

                                    While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "God Save the People!” which explores events leading up to the American Revolution. 

                                    close
                                    Environmental History Seminar An Enervating Environment: Altered Bodies in the Lowcountry and the British West Indies 17 March 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                    Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                    Katherine Johnston, Columbia University Conevery Bolton Valencius, University of Massachusetts - Boston

                                    Rescheduled from February 10.

                                    This paper examines the interactions between humans and the environment in the eighteenth century. Both Britons and creoles believed in a close connection between bodies and place, and colonists tried to change the environment based on those perceptions. That interaction created concern for Caribbean inhabitants who attempted to manage the environment to promote their health while noting the environmental changes their actions caused.

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                                    Brown Bag Networks of Faith and Finance: Boston’s Scottish Exile Community in the Later Seventeenth Century 18 March 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Craig Gallagher, Boston College

                                    Many Scots fled their native country to escape persecution at the hands of their monarch Charles II for their adherence to the Presbyterian faith. A significant number sought refuge in Boston, a city whose leaders they knew to be sympathetic to their plight and in which they spied a commercial opportunity. Between 1660 and 1689, they cultivated networks of faith and finance. Through their patrons in the Dutch and English Atlantic Worlds, these Scots were well placed to capitalize on political opportunities that emerged after the Glorious Revolution.

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                                    Public Program, Author Talk, Landscape Architecture Series Landscape Architect Arthur Shurcliff 18 March 2015.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Please RSVP   registration required 6:00 program with 5:30 reception Elizabeth Hope Cushing, independent author $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members of the MHS, Mount Auburn Cemetery and the Nichols House Museum) Landscape Architects Series

                                    Landscape Architects Series
                                    Program 3

                                    In 1928 Boston landscape architect Arthur A. Shurcliff began what became one of the most important examples of the American Colonial Revival landscape—Colonial Williamsburg, a project that stretched into the 1940s and included town and highway planning as well as residential and institutional gardens. A graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1894, Shurcliff immediately went back to school at Harvard University where his mentor, Charles Eliot, helped him piece together a program in the Art History Department, the Lawrence Scientific School and the Bussey Institute. Upon graduation with a second Bachelor of Science, he worked in Frederick Law Olmsted’s office for eight years, acquiring a broad and sophisticated knowledge of the profession. When he opened his practice in 1904, Shurcliff emphasized his expertise in town planning. Two decades later, when he was tapped to be Chief Landscape Architect at Colonial Williamsburg, he was a seasoned professional whose commissions included his Boston work, campus design, town planning, and a robust practice in private domestic design.  How he utilized the skills he acquired over the years, and how his professional expertise intermingled with his avocational interests in history, craftsmanship, and design is the subject of Cushing’s biography—a story that inexorably sweeps him to his work in the restoration and recreation at Colonial Williamsburg.

                                    Elizabeth Hope Cushing, Ph.D., is the author of a newly published book about Boston landscape architect Arthur A. Shurcliff (1870–1957), based on her doctoral dissertation for the American and New England Studies program at Boston University. She is also a coauthor, with Keith N. Morgan and Roger Reed, of  Community by Design, released in 2013.  Cushing is a practicing landscape historian who consults, writes, and lectures on landscape matters. She has written cultural landscape history reports for the Taft Art Museum in Cincinnati, The National Park Service, the Department of Conservation and Recreation of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and other institutions and agencies. Her contributor credits include Pioneers of American Landscape Design (McGraw Hill Companies, 2000), Design with Culture: Claiming America’s Landscape Heritage (University of Virginia Press, 2005), Shaping the American Landscape (University of Virginia Press, 2009), and Drawing Toward Home (Historic New England, 2010). She has received a grant from the Gill Family Foundation to write a biography of Frederick Law Olmsted Jr., which she is currently researching.


                                    Landscape Architects Series

                                     

                                    Enjoy a series of programs on some of New England’s most distinguished landscape architects. Landscape Architect Arthur Shurcliff is the final program in the series. The Landscape Architects series has been made possible by the generous underwriting of Stephen Stimson Associates Landscape Architects and is cosponsored by the Mount Auburn Cemetery and the Nichols House Museum.

                                    close
                                    MHS Tour History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 21 March 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

                                    The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

                                    While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "God Save the People!” which explores events leading up to the American Revolution. 

                                    close
                                    Immigration and Urban History Seminar Remaking Boston's Chinatown: Race, Place, and Redevelopment after World War II 24 March 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                    Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                    Thomas Chen, Brown University Comment: Jim Vrabel, author of A People's History of the New Boston

                                    This paper examines how Boston’s Chinese American community confronted urban change in the decades after World War II. Focusing on contests over Chinatown space and place, it explores how postwar formations of Chinese American identity and community were intertwined with the urban transformation that Boston and other American cities underwent in this period.

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                                    Brown Bag Allegiance and Protection: The Problem of Subjecthood in the Glorious Revolution, 1680-95 25 March 2015.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Alex Jablonski, State University of New York at Binghamton

                                    This project explores the ways in which people in the British Isles and the American colonies struggled to define their status as subjects of the English king in a decade whose political, religious, and cultural turmoil frustrated any simple answer. At its heart, this debate unfolded over the nature of obedience owed to a sovereign power, and as a result spilled from the narrow banks of legal theory onto a far broader plain of concerns about character and identity in a quite large and diverse empire.

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                                    Public Program, Author Talk, Conversation, Lincoln and the Legacy of Conflict A Civil Conversation: James McPherson and Louis Masur 26 March 2015.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM SOLD OUT! James McPherson, Princeton University; Louis Masur, Rutgers University Facilitated by Carol Bundy Lincoln Series

                                    Lincoln & the Legacy of Conflict Series
                                    Program 1

                                    On the eve of the 150th anniversary of the assassination of President Lincoln, two eminent Civil War historians will discuss the cause of the war, the abolition of slavery, how the aftermath of the war weighed on Lincoln, and what the Civil War means to America today. Their conversation will spring, in part, from their new books, McPherson’s The War that Forged a Nation and Masur’s Lincoln’s Last Speech.

                                    James M. McPherson is a renowned historian of the American Civil War, and is the George Henry Davis '86 Professor Emeritus of United States History at Princeton University. He is the author of many works of history, including Battle Cry of Freedom, which won the 1989 Pulitzer Prize and has sold over half a million copies.

                                    Louis P. Masur is Distinguished Professor of American Studies and History at Rutgers University. He is the author of many books, including The Civil War: A Concise History and Lincoln's Hundred Days: The Emancipation Proclamation and the War for the Union. Masur’s essays and reviews have appeared in the New York Times, Boston Globe, Chicago Tribune, and Los Angeles Times. 


                                    Lincoln and the Legacy of Conflict Series

                                    The MHS will commemorate the sesquicentennial of the end of the Civil War and the assassination of Pres. Abraham Lincoln with a series of programs. Renowned authors and historians will explore the war, the president, and the legacy this conflict has left. A Civil Conversation with James McPherson and Louis Masur is the first program in the series. Founders' Son: A Life of Abraham Lincoln with Richard Brookhiser will take place on Wednesday, 1 April. Mourning Lincoln with Martha Hodes will take place on Wednesday, 8 April. Mourning Lincoln & Racial Equality with John Stauffer will take place on Wednesday, 15 April.

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                                    Teacher Workshop, Public Program, Lincoln and the Legacy of Conflict Canceled:
                                    Emancipation & Assassination: Remembering Abraham Lincoln
                                    28 March 2015.Saturday, 9:00AM - 3:00PM Please RSVP   registration required

                                    How did the people of Massachusetts react to Lincoln’s presidential politics? How did they mourn his death in 1865? Using documents and artifacts from the Society’s collections, participants will explore Lincoln’s legacy in his own time, and debate what his legacy is – or should be – in the twenty-first century. This program is open to all K-12 educators, as well as history enthusiasts. Teachers can earn 5 PDPs for the workshop (and additional PDPs for attending related programs).

                                    Fee: $25 per person (includes lunch and materials)

                                    For more information: contact the education department at education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

                                    To register: Complete our Registration Form and send it to the education department at education@masshist.org.

                                    Program Highlights

                                    • Learn more about new digital resources available from the MHS and Ford's Theatre.
                                    • View Lincoln-related treasures from the Society’s collections.
                                    • Discover methods for teaching Lincoln's life and legacy.
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                                    MHS Tour History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society 28 March 2015.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

                                    The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

                                    While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "God Save the People!” which explores events leading up to the American Revolution. 

                                    close
                                    Early American History Seminar Frontiers and Geopolitics of Early America 31 March 2015.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                    Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                    Patrick Spero, Williams College Comment: Kate Grandjean, Wellesley College

                                    This essay investigates the use of the term “frontier” in its colonial context to show that the word conveyed a potent message that affected the political development of British North America. More than just an etymological exercise, the research shows how governmental and social understandings of frontiers and their specific locations influenced official policies and settler action. It argues that a disagreement over the location and treatment of the imperial frontier in the 1760s created a crisis of empire in the years preceding Independence. The essay ends with an examination of changes to the word’s meaning within American society in the early national period.

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