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Beehive series: Today @MHS

This Week @ MHS

May is arrived! With it comes a full month of programs taking place here at the Society for public consumption. Kicking off the month, we have

- Tuesday, 3 May, 5:15PM : "'They bid me speak what I thought he would give': The Commodification of Captive People During King Phillip's War" is an Early American History seminar event presented by Joanne Jahnke Wegner from the University of Minnesota. Wegner's essay addresses the systems of human trafficking that circulated both Native American and English captives during King Phillip's War. Kate Grandjean of Wellesley College provides comment. Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP requiredSubscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.

- Wednesday, 4 May, 12:00PM : Join us at noon for our next Brown Bag lunch talk, this time featuring Michael Zakim of Tel Aviv University and the Charles Warren Center. "Fear and Loathing at the Crystal Palace: the Failure of America's First World's Fair" examines how an enthusiastic group of New Yorkers, hoping to repeat the success of London's 1851 Exhibition, ended up stoking ongoing American debate over the changing meaning of industry in these years of the Industrial Revolution. This talk is free and open to the public. 

- Saturday, 7 May, 10:00AM : Stop by for The History and Collections of the MHSa docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.orgWhile you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition.

- Satuday, 7 May, 5:00PM : "Mad for Glory: The True Story of Two Americans and the Fate of the Pacific World" is an author talk with Robert Booth. This book tells a story set amidst the confusion of the War of 1812 in which two charismatic Americans played out an astonishing drama of nation-building and imperialism in the Pacific. This talk is open to the public, registration required for $10 (no charge for MHS Members and Fellows). A pre-talk reception begins at 4:30PM. 

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 1 May, 2016, 12:00 AM

This Week @ MHS

Here are the public programs on-tap for this ultimate week of April:

- Tuesday, 26 April, 5:15PM : The next installment in the Immigration and Urban History seminar series, featuring Rebecca Marchiel of the University of Mississippi, is called "Communities Must Be Vigilant: The Financial Turn in National Urban Policy." This chapter from Marchiel's book project explores the mixed results of 1970s efforts to revitalize neighborhoods through community-bank partnerships. Davarian Baldwin, Trinity College, provides comment. Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP requiredSubscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.

- Wednesday, 27 April, 12:00PM : Pack a lunch and stopy by on Wednesday for another Brown Bag lunch talk. This time, short-term fellow Christina Carrick, Boston University, presents "Among Strangers in a Distant Climate: Loyalist Exiles Define Empire and Nation, 1775-1783." Carrick's project uses Loyalist correspondence networks to examine how exiles crafted and empowered new identities and in the process helped to reshape the British Empire and the United States. This talk is free and open to the public. All are welcome!

- Wednesday, 27 April, 6:00PM : Also on Wednesday is a special author talk titled "'Most Blessed of the Patriarchs' Thomas Jefferson and the Empire of the Imagination." This talk features Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Annette Gordon-Reed of Harvard Law School and University of Virginia's Peter S. Onuf, the country's leading Jefferson scholar, as they discuss their absorbing and revealing character study which clarifies the philosophy of Thomas Jefferson. This event is sold out. 

- Saturday, 30 April, 10:00AM : The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition.

 

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 24 April, 2016, 12:00 AM

This Week @ MHS

The Society is CLOSED on Monday, 18 April, in observance of Patriot's Day. But despite a shortened week, we still have these programs on tap:

- Tuesday, 19 April, 1:00PM : Looking for something fun to do during school vacation week? Look no further! Join us for "Comic History - Making Your Own Comic Explaining the Stamp Act." This family program features noted historian J.L. Bell and the Boston Comics Roundtable who will engage participants in the history of the Stamp Act through stories of 18th century children and then assist and inspire young historians to create their own comic based on the events. The workshops are free, although space is limited and prior registration is required, please RSVP. The program and the comic book have been made possible through the support of the Society of the Cincinnati and the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

- Wednesday 20 April, 9:00AM : "Teaching Thomas Jefferson" is an interdisiplinary workshop which introduces participants to the Society's collection of Jeffeson manuscripts. This program is open to educators and history enthusiasts for a fee of $25 per person (to cover materials and lunch). Educators can earn 22.5 PDPs or one graduate credit (for an additional fee). To Register / For more information: complete this registration form, or contact the education department ateducation@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

- Wednesday, 20 April, 6:00PM : "The Citizen Poets of Boston: A Collection of Forgotten Poems, 1789-1820" is a public author talk featuring Paul Lewis of Boston College. Lewis and his research team completed a 3-year project at Boston College to review about 4,500 poems published in 59 different literary magazines. These mostly forgotten works have been brought back to light in this publication. Mr. Lewis and members of the research team will discuss the project and read from the book. This talk is open to the public, registration required. There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30PM and the talk begins at 6:00PM.

- Saturday, 23 April, 10:00AM : Our Saturday tour returns! After a few weeks off, we are back with The History and Collections of the MHS, a docent-led tour through the public spaces in our building on Boylston St. This tour is free and open to the public, no reservations required for small groups or individuals. Larger parties of 8 or more should contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley in advance at abentley@masshist.org or 617-646-0508.

 

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 17 April, 2016, 12:00 AM

This Week @ MHS

It's that time again. Here are the events coming in the week ahead:

- Monday, 11 April, 6:00PM : On Monday evening is a public program featuring former transportation secretary Frederick Salvucci, MIT, who discusses the impact and legacy of the Big Dig. Registration is required with a cost of $20 (no charge for MHS Members and Fellows). A pre-talk reception begins at 5:30PM and the talk begins at 6:00PM.

- Tuesday, 12 April, 5:15PM : Join us on Tuesday evening for an Environmental History seminar. This time, Jennifer Thomson of Bucknell University presents "Surviving the 1970s: The Case of the Friends of the Earth." The project examines environmental politics amidst de-regulation, economic crisis, and nativism in the 1970s. Chad Montrie of the University of Massachusetts - Lowell provides comment. Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP requiredSubscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.

- Thursday, 14 April, 5:30PM : The second seminar of the week is from the History of Women and Gender series and is presented by Katherine Marino of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, with Harvard's Kristen Weld providing comment. The talk is called "The Origins of 'Women's Rights are Human Rights' : Pan-American Feminism and the 1945 United Nations Charter" and examines what "women's rights" and "human rights" meant to a group of Latin American activists and how a movement of transnational, Pan-American feminism shaped their ideas and activism.

- Friday, 15 April, 2:00PM : Curator of Art and Artifacts, Anne Bentley, gives a gallery talk titled "The Conservation of the Notes on the State of Virginia," an item on dispaly at the Society as part of the current exhibition, The Private Jefferson. This talk is free and open to the public.  

There is no Saturday tour scheduled this week. 

Please note that the MHS is closed on Monday, 18 April, in observance of Patriot's Day. 

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 10 April, 2016, 1:38 PM

This Week @ MHS

This coming week is a busy one here at the MHS. Please note that the library closes at 1:00PM on Friday, 8 April. Now, here is the weekly round-up of events ahead:

- Tuesday, 5 April, 5:15PM : Join us for an Early American History seminar featuring past MHS research fellow Jared Hardesty of Western Washington University. During this session he presents "Constructing Castle William: An Intimate History of Labor and Empire in Provincial America," which explores a five-year project fraught with corruption, labor strife, ineptitude, and supply shortages. Eliga H. Gould of the University of New  Hampshire provides comment. Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP requiredSubscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.

- Wednesday, 6 April, 12:00PM :  "The Elusive Quest: African-American Emigration to Haiti and the Struggle for Full Citizenship in the United States, 1815-1865" is a Brown Bag lunch talk presented by MHS research fellow Westenley Alcenat of Columbia Univeristy and MIT. The project explores the exprience and radicalism of the African-American settlers who emigrated to Haiti throughout the nineteenth century and how the migration influenced African-American and Haitian political thought before and during the American Civil War. This talk is free and open to the public. 

- Wednesday, 6 April, 6:00PM : "Louisa: The Extraordinary Life of Mrs. Adams" is an author talk featuring Louisa Thomas. The story of Louisa Catherine Adams is one of a woman who forged a sense of self. As the country her husband led found its place in the world, she found a voice. That voice resonates still. Registration is required for this event at a cost of $20 (no charge for MHS Fellows and Members). A pre-talk reception starts at 5:30PM and the talk begins at 6:00PM.

- Thursday, 7 April, 5:30PM : The latest installment of the New England Biography Seminar series is here. "BioFictions - Turning 'Real' People into Fictional Characters" is a discussion, moderated by Megan Marshall of Emerson College, among novelists Geraldine Brooks, Matthew Pearl, and Alice Hoffman, in which the participants talk about the process, where they draw the line between fact and fiction, and what inspires them to make fiction out of history.  THIS EVENT IS NOW FILLED. Email seminars@masshist.org to be placed on a wait list. You will be contacted in the event of a cancellation.

- Saturday, 9 April, 10:00AMThe History and Collections of the MHS is a docent-led walk through the public spaces in the Society's home on Boylston Street. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition. The exhibition galleries are open to the public free of charge, Monday-Friday, 10:00AM-4:00PM.

- Saturday, 9 April, 1:00PM : "Begin at the Beginning: Daniel Gookin, Praying Indians, and America's Bloodiest War." Join independent historian Dwight Mackerron and those who love 17th-century history to talk about King Philip's War. How New England descended into this violence is the subject of our conversation. Participants are invited to share their own knowledge of the war. Registration is required for this event at no cost. This event is co-hosted with the Partnership of Historic Bostons, www.historicbostons.org.

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 3 April, 2016, 12:00 AM

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