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Beehive series: Today @MHS

This Week @ MHS

The MHS is CLOSED on Monday, 20 February, for Presidents' Day. 

Despite the holiday-shortened week, there is quite a bit of activity at the Society. Here's is what we have the calendar for the final full week of February:

- POSTPONED : "Harvest for War: Fruits, Nuts, Imperialism, and Gas Mask Manufacture in the United States During World War I," originally scheduled for Tuesday, 21 February, is postponed to Tuesday, 9 May, 5:15PM. 

- Wednesday, 22 February to Thursday, 23 February : "Women in the Ear of the American Revolution" is a two-day teacher workshop open to K-12 educators. Participants will explore the daily lives of revolutionary women, including those who served as soldiers and secret agents, or followed the army as cooks and laundresses. The program fee includes a visit to the Museum of Fine Arts. Please email education@masshist.org or call 617-646-0557 for more information or to register.

- Wednesday, 22 February, 12:00PM : Stop by at lunchtime for a Brown Bag talk with Emily C. Burns of Auburn University. Her talk, "Constructing American Belatedness: The Archives of American Artists in Late Nineteenth-Century Paris" culls archival materials to understand how American culture collectively became defined through internatioanl mobility as belated and innocent. This talk is free and open to the public. 

- Wednesday, 22 February, 6:00PM : "MIT: History and Architecture," is a public talk with Douglass Shand-Tucci, author of the recently published MIT: The Campus Guide. This talk focuses on the way MIT and Harvard, now universally ranked among the top five seats of higher learning in the world, reflected Boston 19th century Unitarian tradtion and framed its Brahmin Ascendancy. Registration is required for this program with a fee of $10 (no charge for MHS Fellows or Members). Pre-talk reception begins at 5:30PM followed by the speaking program at 6:00PM. 

- Thursday, 23 February, 5:30PM : Please join us for a conversation with the authors of two important new books in the history of sexuality. "Sexuality of History, History of Sexuality" is part of the History of Women and Gender seminar series.  This wide-ranging discussion, with Sue Lanser of Brandeis  University and Jim Downs of Connecticut College, will explore the relationship between lesbian and gay male histories, literary and historical methods, representation and political mobilization of people and communities. Jen Manion of Amherst College moderates the discussion. Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP requiredSubscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers. Please note that there are no precirculated essays for this session. This program takes place at Radcliffe, Fay House, Sheerr Room, 10 Garden St. in Cambridge.

- Saturday, 25 February, 9:00AM : "Abraham Lincoln & Emancipation" is a teacher workshop open to K-12 educators. MHS staff and participants will use primary sources from the Society's collection to discuss and debate Lincoln's grounds for opposing slavery and his thoughts on colonization, abolition, and gradual emancipation. The group will be joined by Kevin M. Levin, author of Civil War Memory. Registration is required with a fee of $25. Please email education@masshist.org or call 617-646-0557 for more information or to register. This workshop was originally scheduled for Saturday, 11 February.

- Saturday, 25 February, 1:00PM : "Begin at the Beginning: Mapping New England - a visual story." Join MHS librarian Peter Drummey in investigating the world of early New England maps: how they were created; what they included and what they omitted; the images their creators choose and the messages they conveyed. Were early maps designed to encourage emigrants, or aids to navigation? Did they chart colonial-Native American conflict or paint an idyllic garden scene? Find out how these non-textual artifacts communicated the world of 17th-century New England. Registration is required at no cost. Please RSVP 

NOTE: This meeting is a discussion, not a lecture. Come prepared to examine maps, raise questions, and make your points! No expertise required, just a willingness to engage with primary material, talk to fellow attendees, and enjoy yourself.

- Saturday, 25 February, 10:00AM-4:00PM : This is your last chance to view our current exhibition, Turning Points in American History, which ends on 2/25

There is no public tour this week.

 

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 19 February, 2017, 12:00 AM

This Week @ MHS

Coming back after a couple of snow days, we have a quiet week ahead here at the Society. Please be sure to check our website and calendar in the coming weeks to be aware of weather closures. 

- Thursday, 16 February, 6:00PM : Of Arms and Artists: The American Revolution Through Painters' Eyes contains the stories of five artists - Peale, Copley, Trumbull, West, and Stuart - who interacted continually with the nation's Founders. Each story opens a fresh window on the Revolutionary era, making more human the figures we have long honored as our Founders, and deepening our understanding of the whirlwind out of hw hich the United STates emereged. Join us for a talk with Paul Staiti of Mount Holyoke College who authored the book. This talk is open to the public but registration is required with a fee of $10 (no charge for MHS Members or Fellows). A pre-talk reception begins at 5:30PM and the program starts at 6:00PM. 

- Saturday, 18 February, 10:00AM : The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: Turning Points in American History.

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 12 February, 2017, 12:00 AM

This Week @ MHS

Here are the events scheduled for the week ahead:

- Tuesday, 7 February, 5:15PM : First up this week is a seminar from the Early American History series. "The Coromantee War in Jamaica: Charting the Course of an Atlantic Slave Revolt" is presented by Vincent Brown of Harvard University and discusses the African diasporic warfare in the Americas. The talk is drawn from Brown's current book project which puts the Jamaican Revolt of 1760-1761 in the context of a dramatic series of 17th- and 18th-century revolts and conspiracies that were staged by enslaved Africans from the Gold Coast, known widely as "Coromantees." Malick Ghachem of MIT provides comment. Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP requiredSubscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.

- Wednesday, 8 February, 6:00PM : Join us for a talk with Kenneth Rendell of the Museum of World War II, a noted collector and dealer of historical documents and artifacts. The collection, open to the public and dedicated to preserving and exhibiting the reality of World War II, is made up of over 7,000 artifacts and more that 500,000 documents and photographs. In this program, "Collecting the World at War, 1919-1946," Rendell discusses the challenges he's faced in the past 58 yeras of collection, globally, the most cataclysmic event of modern times. This talk is open to the public; registraiton is required at a fee of $20 (no charge for MHS Fellows or Members). A pre-talk reception begins at 5:30PM and the talk starts at 6:00PM.

- Saturday, 11 February, 9:00AM : "Abraham Lincoln & Emancipation" is a teacher workshop open to K-12 educators. MHS staff and participants will use primary sources from the Society's collection to discuss and debate Lincoln's grounds for opposing slavery and his thoughts on colonization, abolition, and gradual emancipation. The group will be joined by Kevin M. Levin, author of Civil War Memory. Registration is required with a fee of $25. Please email education@masshist.org or call 617-646-0557 for more information or to register.

There is no public tour this week.

Rembember to stop by to view our current exhibition, Turning Points in American History. The exhibit is free and open to the public Monday-Saturday, 10:00AM-4:00PM. Your last chance to view this exhibit is on Saturday, 25 February, its final day.

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 5 February, 2017, 12:00 AM

This Week @ MHS

February starts slowly at the MHS. As we leave January behind it is a fairly quiet week here at the MHS. Here is what is to come:

- Wednesday, 1 February, 12:00PM : Pack a lunch and come by for a Brown Bag talk with Andrea Gray of George Mason University and the Thomas Jefferson Foundation. "'Leaving their callings': Retirement in the Early Republic" looks at elderly men in the early national period who voluntarily left their public careers and permanently returned to domestic life. By examining their motives, how they spent their retired years, and the impression they made on their fellow Americans, we gain important insights into the relationship between aging, work and public service, gender, and republican civic virtue. This talk is free and open to the public. 

- Saturday, 4 February, 10:00AM : The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: Turning Points in American History. This exhibition ends on Saturday, 25 February, so don't wait!

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 29 January, 2017, 12:00 AM

This Week @ MHS

It's a pretty busy week ahead for programs at the Society. Here is what's on tap:

- Monday, 23 January, 12:00PM : Come on in at lunchtime for a Brown Bag talk. "'Faraway Women' and the Atlantic Monthly" discusses Ellery Sedgwick, editor of the Atlantic Monthly from 1908-1938, and the "Faraway Women" who were viewed as a defining feature of his career: women who published in the Atlantic accounts of unusual life experiences in Europe, Asia, the American South, and, most especially, the American West. The talk is presented by Cathryn Halverson of the University of Groningen. This talk is free and open to the public. 

- Tuesday, 24 January, 5:15PM : This week's seminar is from the Modern American Society and Culture series and is a panel discussion. "Urban History on the Digital Frontier" features Vivek Bald of MIT, Jack A. Dougherty of Trinity College, and Marilynn S. Johnson of Boston College. Bald is working on a transmedia project that includes a digital oral history website; Dougherty and his students are writing an open-access book which features interactive maps and oral history videos; Johnson's Global Boston is a public history website combining student research, oral history, and a curated selection of digitized primary sources, images and maps documenting the local immigrant experience. The discussion is moderated by Douglas O'Reagan of MIT. Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP requiredSubscribe to receive advance copies of the seminar papers.

- Thursday, 26 January, 6:00PM : Please join us for a special author talk which will feature a discussion between Stephen Kinzer of the Boston Globe, and Emmy Award-winning host of Here and Now, Robin Young. The discussion focuses on Kinzer's latest book, The True Flag: Theodore Roosevelt, Mark Twain, and the Birth of American Empire. In asking how the United States should act in the world, Kinzer reveals a piece of forgotten history and transports us to the dawn of the 20th century, when the United States first found itself with the chance to dominate faraway lands. This talk is open to the public, registration required with a fee of $20 (No charge for MHS Fellows or Members). There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30PM and the program begins at 6:00PM. 

- Saturday, 28 January, 10:00AM : The History and Collections of the MHS is a 90-minute docent-led walk through the public rooms of the Society's home on Boylston Street. The tour is free and open to the public with no reservations needed for individuals or small groups. Larger parties (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley in advance at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org. While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition: Turning Points in American History.

- Saturday, 28 January, 1:00PM : The next installment of our Begin at the Beginning series looks at Medical and Surgical Care in Puritan New England. From bloodletting to powders made from roasted toads, medical care in early New England was of uncertain value to the patient. In this discussion of primary documents led by Sid Levitsky of Harvard Medical School, we’ll explore the foundations of 17th century English medicine and surgery and the practice of medicine in New England. Please RSVP. This event is done in cooperation with the Partnership of Historic Bostons. 

comments: 0 | permalink | Published: Sunday, 22 January, 2017, 12:00 AM

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