Calendar of Events

Exhibition

Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country

Massachusetts Women in WWI. 12 June 2014 to 24 January 2015

Details

August

Brown Bag Character Detectives: Female Physiognomists in the Early American Republic 1 August 2014.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Rachel Walker, University of Maryland This project examines the fraught connection between female beauty, morality, and intelligence in ...

This project examines the fraught connection between female beauty, morality, and intelligence in the post-Enlightenment era. It examines how cultural ideas concerning these traits became intertwined by studying the 18th- and 19th-century “science” of physiognomy—a discipline rooted in the notion that an individual could discern a person’s moral and mental characteristics merely by examining his or her facial features. Early Americans discussed male and female physiognomy in distinct ways and used discussions about female appearance to distinguish between the moral and intellectual capacities of men and women. 

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 2 August 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Brown Bag The Labor of Self-Making in New England Mill Women's Poetry 4 August 2014.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Robin Smith, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill One of the most visible and publicly discussed moments in the history of American working women was ...

One of the most visible and publicly discussed moments in the history of American working women was the entrance of women into the industrial textile mills of New England in the 1830s and 1840s. The figure of the “female operative” or “Lowell mill girl” fostered an unprecedented public interest in the lives and labor of working women, and the mill women seized this opportunity to publicly challenge the obstacles that industrial labor posed to 19th century ideas of humanity and a coherent sense of self. Drawing upon poems and prose pieces written by women mill workers for publication in literary magazines such as The Lowell Offering, I will argue that for mill women, writing poetry was an important means of humanizing potentially dehumanizing labor; through the rhythms of poetry, they reclaimed control of time and in so doing, made space for fortifying their creative, coherent selves.

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Teacher Workshop, Public Programbegins Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 6 August 2014.Wednesday, 8:30AM - 3:30PM This event will take place in Searsport, Maine. What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before ...

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation in 1776? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in New England towns as the United States was attempting to form a new government in the 1780s and 1790s. We will discuss the truly participatory, well-informed conversations taking place in town halls and meeting places throughout the new colonies-turned-states. By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story.

Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • investigate what it was like to live in an old town in a new country and discover what changed for the inhabitants of different towns as new government structures were implemented.
  • discuss the concerns (both local and national) expressed by Massachusetts & New Hampshire residents in various towns while the American government was being created in the years after the revolution.
  • explore the ways in which geography, economy, and social/cultural practices influenced local concerns.
  • discover evidence of local concerns, and discussions of national policies, in primary sources held by local repositories and the Massachusetts Historical Society.
  • explore new ways of engaging students and local communities in their history.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

Additional two-day workshops will be held in Pepperell, Massachusetts & Milford, New Hampshire, July 30-31; in Falmouth, Massachusetts, August 13-14; and in Framingham, Massachusetts, September 26-27.

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Brown Bag "The Day of Sainthood Has Passed": American Abolitionists and the Golden Moment of the Civil War, 1861-1865 6 August 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Frank Cirillo, University of Virginia This project explores the divisions among American abolitionists over whether or not to support the ...

This project explores the divisions among American abolitionists over whether or not to support the Lincoln Administration and the Union war effort during the Civil War. The choices that longtime reformers made in confronting the changed landscape of wartime America, and the series of schisms within the movement that ensued, helps to explain how the Union war achieved both so much and so little in terms of black social and political rights.

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Teacher Workshop, Public Programends Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 7 August 2014.Thursday, 8:30AM - 3:30PM This event will take place in Searsport, Maine. What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before ...

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation in 1776? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in New England towns as the United States was attempting to form a new government in the 1780s and 1790s. We will discuss the truly participatory, well-informed conversations taking place in town halls and meeting places throughout the new colonies-turned-states. By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story.

Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • investigate what it was like to live in an old town in a new country and discover what changed for the inhabitants of different towns as new government structures were implemented.
  • discuss the concerns (both local and national) expressed by Massachusetts & New Hampshire residents in various towns while the American government was being created in the years after the revolution.
  • explore the ways in which geography, economy, and social/cultural practices influenced local concerns.
  • discover evidence of local concerns, and discussions of national policies, in primary sources held by local repositories and the Massachusetts Historical Society.
  • explore new ways of engaging students and local communities in their history.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

Additional two-day workshops will be held in Pepperell, Massachusetts & Milford, New Hampshire, July 30-31; in Falmouth, Massachusetts, August 13-14; and in Framingham, Massachusetts, September 26-27.

details
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 9 August 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

details
Teacher Workshop, Public Programbegins Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 13 August 2014.Wednesday, 8:30AM - 3:30PM This event will take place in Falmouth, Massachusetts. What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before ...

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation after the Revolution? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop -- offered in conjunction with the Falmouth Museums on the Green -- will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in New England towns like Falmouth as the United States was becoming a new nation in the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries.  By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story.

Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • investigate what it was like to live in an old town in a new country and discover what changed for the inhabitants of Falmouth and Cape Cod as new government structures were implemented.
  • discuss the concerns (both local and national) expressed by Massachusetts residents while the American government was being created in the years after the revolution.
  • explore the ways in which geography, economy, and social/cultural practices influenced local concerns.
  • discover evidence of local concerns, and discussions of national policies, in primary sources held by the Falmouth Historical Society and the Massachusetts Historical Society.
  • explore new ways of engaging students and local communities in their history.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

Additional two-day workshops will be held in Pepperell, Massachusetts & Milford, New Hampshire, July 30-31; in Searsport, Maine, August 6-7; and in Framingham, Massachusetts, September 26-27.

Image: Fracis Wicks House, c. 1790. Falmouth Museum on the Green.

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Brown Bag Military Wives in Eighteenth-Century Boston 13 August 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Serena Zabin, Carleton College When British troops came to Boston in 1768, hundreds of army wives and children came with them. At ...

When British troops came to Boston in 1768, hundreds of army wives and children came with them. At the time, Boston newspapers exclaimed in horror at the arrival of these army women, referring to them as the “dregs and refuse of all nations.” Yet tantalizing hints in the diaries of Massachusetts militia and provincial soldiers suggest that during the campaigns in 1745 to Louisburg and throughout the Seven Years War, women may have occasionally also accompanied Massachusetts troops. If so, some Boston women may themselves have once been military wives, a possibility that no historian has ever considered, and one that might explain some of the relationships that came to develop between British regulars and Boston civilians in the months preceding the Boston Massacre.

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Teacher Workshop, Public Programends Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 14 August 2014.Thursday, 8:30AM - 3:30PM This event will take place in Falmouth, Massachusetts. What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before ...

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation after the Revolution? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop -- offered in conjunction with the Falmouth Museums on the Green -- will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in New England towns like Falmouth as the United States was becoming a new nation in the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries.  By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story.

Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • investigate what it was like to live in an old town in a new country and discover what changed for the inhabitants of Falmouth and Cape Cod as new government structures were implemented.
  • discuss the concerns (both local and national) expressed by Massachusetts residents while the American government was being created in the years after the revolution.
  • explore the ways in which geography, economy, and social/cultural practices influenced local concerns.
  • discover evidence of local concerns, and discussions of national policies, in primary sources held by the Falmouth Historical Society and the Massachusetts Historical Society.
  • explore new ways of engaging students and local communities in their history.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

Additional two-day workshops will be held in Pepperell, Massachusetts & Milford, New Hampshire, July 30-31; in Searsport, Maine, August 6-7; and in Framingham, Massachusetts, September 26-27.

Image: Fracis Wicks House, c. 1790. Falmouth Museum on the Green.

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Brown Bag The Death and Transfiguration of New England Psalmody, ca. 1790-1860 15 August 2014.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Brenton Grom, Case Western Reserve University   The robust culture of psalm- and hymn-singing that flourished in Revolutionary New ...

 

The robust culture of psalm- and hymn-singing that flourished in Revolutionary New England became subject to Europeanizing reforms after the turn of the nineteenth century. Introducing these reform efforts as instances of political and theological ideology operating within a larger discourse of refinement, this presentation focuses on their surprisingly variable reception as revealed in copybooks and marginalia. It furthermore considers Victorian values of home, sentiment, and historical memory as masks for the retention of outmoded musical styles in later years.

 

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 16 August 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Brown Bag Operating Outside of Empire: Trade and Citizenship in the Atlantic World, 1756-1812 18 August 2014.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Mark Dragoni, Syracuse University This project examines merchants operating at the edge of empire and the competing discourses on  ...

This project examines merchants operating at the edge of empire and the competing discourses on trade, cosmopolitanism, and neutrality that statesmen, philosophers, and merchants mobilized. Under increasing demands for consumer goods, states were willing to bend supposedly strict mercantilist regulations to guarantee the steady supply of commodities in the metropole. This program will look at Samuel Cabot's and John and Jonathan Amory's participation in this often illicit, yet highly profitable transatlantic carrying trade during the foundational period for modern citizenship and increasing state regulation.

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Brown Bag Ten Years of Winter: The Cold Decade and Environmental Consciousness in the Early 19th Century 22 August 2014.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Sean Munger, University of Oregon Between 1810 and 1820, a series of volcanic eruptions around the world caused a temporary global ...

Between 1810 and 1820, a series of volcanic eruptions around the world caused a temporary global climate change with dramatic effects, the most famous of them being the "Year Without Summer" (1816). This research attempts to understand how people in the English-speaking world understood and evaluated these anomalies, and what their reactions tell us about the state of scientific thinking, environmental consciousness, and how their worlds—both global and local—were constructed.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 23 August 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Building Closed Labor Day 30 August 2014.Saturday, all day The MHS library and galleries will be closed Labor Day weekend.

The MHS library and galleries will be closed Labor Day weekend.

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September
Building Closed Labor Day 1 September 2014.Monday, all day The MHS library and galleries will be closed Labor Day weekend.

The MHS library and galleries will be closed Labor Day weekend.

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Notice Library Hours Changing: No Tuesday evening hours 2 September 2014.Tuesday, all day Beginning 2 September 2014 the MHS library will no longer be open on Tuesday evenings. The new ...

Beginning 2 September 2014 the MHS library will no longer be open on Tuesday evenings. The new library hours will be:

9:00 AM - 4:45 PM Mon. - Fri.
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM Sat.

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Brown Bag Unspeakable Loss: North America’s Invisible Throat Distemper Epidemic of 1735–1765 3 September 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Nicholas Bonneau, University of Notre Dame While the New England throat distemper epidemic never achieved the notoriety acquired by other more ...

While the New England throat distemper epidemic never achieved the notoriety acquired by other more notorious diseases of the colonial era, no single epidemic of that period proved more deadly to European settlers. This project asks why this epidemic escaped comment by contemporaries and past historians while raising interpretive questions informing our larger views of change, the priority of documentation, and the role of memory. 

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Brown Bag Sculpting the Citizen Soldier: Civil War Memory and the Life Cycle of Monuments 10 September 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Sarah Beetham, University of Delaware Do monuments hold their meaning over time? In this talk, Dr. Beetham will explore how Civil War ...

Do monuments hold their meaning over time? In this talk, Dr. Beetham will explore how Civil War citizen soldier monuments have factored into community life in the century and a half since the war’s end. Soldier monuments have been interpreted and interpreted, vandalized and hit by cars, amended and moved to new locations. How do these interventions affect our understanding of post-Civil War memory?

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Special Event MHS Graduate Student Reception 18 September 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM All graduate students in American history and related subjects are invited to attend. Faculty ...

All graduate students in American history and related subjects are invited to attend. Faculty members in these fields are also welcome.

Begin the new academic year by meeting graduate students and faculty from other universities who are also working in your field. Enjoy refreshments, take a tour of MHS departments, and learn about the range of resources available to support your work, including MHS fellowship programs. Refreshments and networking begin at 6:00 p.m. and run throughout the evening. Program begins at 6:30 p.m.

No charge. RSVP required by September 17. Email kviens@masshist.org or phone 617-646-0568 with your name and affiliation. Indicate whether you are a graduate student or faculty member.

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar The Importance of Place and Place-makers in the Life of a Los Angeles Community: What Gentrification Erases from Echo Park, 1950s-Present 23 September 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Natalia Molina, University of California - San Diego Comment: Judith Smith, University of Massachusetts - Boston This talk examines a Los Angeles neighborhood, Echo Park, and discusses its history, shaped by its ...

This talk examines a Los Angeles neighborhood, Echo Park, and discusses its history, shaped by its Leftist, Communist, and gay residents.  Beginning in the 1950s and 60s, this neighborhood’s history of progressive politics left a legacy for a wave of Mexican immigrants, allowing them to create a community that reached across social boundaries. The paper looks at Echo Park today to examine this gentrifying area and ask what the role of history is in the neighborhood’s evolving identity.

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Teacher Workshop, Public Programbegins Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 26 September 2014.Friday, 8:30AM - 3:30PM This event will take place at the Framingham History Center. What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before ...

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation in 1776? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in Framingham and other nearby towns as the Americans attempted to create a new nation in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story.

Presenters include Jayne Gordon and Kathleen Barker of the Massachusetts Historical Society  Department of Education and Public Programs; Dean Eastman, educational consultant and co-creator of primaryresearch.org; Kevin Swope, FHC Board Chair; local storyteller Libby Franck and others…

To Register
Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

details
Teacher Workshop, Public Programends Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 27 September 2014.Saturday, 8:30AM - 3:30PM This event will take place at the Framingham History Center. What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before ...

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation in 1776? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in Framingham and other nearby towns as the Americans attempted to create a new nation in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story.

Presenters include Jayne Gordon and Kathleen Barker of the Massachusetts Historical Society  Department of Education and Public Programs; Dean Eastman, educational consultant and co-creator of primaryresearch.org; Kevin Swope, FHC Board Chair; local storyteller Libby Franck and others…

To Register
Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 27 September 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. It begins at 10:00AM. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in World War I." 

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October
Brown Bag Reading Locke on the Plantation 1 October 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Sean Moore, University of New Hampshire This talk will extend into book history Edmund Morgan’s articulation of the well-known paradox ...

This talk will extend into book history Edmund Morgan’s articulation of the well-known paradox that some early Americans were asserting their own desire for freedom from Britain while simultaneously enslaving others. Considering Locke’s political theory, it will examine how the African diaspora underwrote the dissemination of books of British literature and philosophy, and how Jefferson, Washington, and others bartered slave-produced goods for books through the London agents with whom they did business.

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Public Program, Author Talk The Trials of Old New England Towns in a New Nation 1 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Mary Fuhrer, Independent Scholar We tend to think of New England towns in the first decades of the 19th century as peaceful, bucolic ...

Mary White, circa 1840. Courtesy Boylston Historical Society.We tend to think of New England towns in the first decades of the 19th century as peaceful, bucolic havens -- they were not. In this talk, Mary Babson Fuhrer will discuss the remarkable stories of conflict and transformation that reshaped local communities in the decades leading up to the Civil War. As people struggled to work out the promises of the Revolution on the personal level, contrary ideals of community identity and individual interests clashed, until, as one observer noted, "the most malignant passions of our depraved natures raged." The diaries, letters, and account books she draws on form the basis of her recent book, Crisis of Community: Trials and Transformation of a New England Town, 1815-1848.

Mary Babson Fuhrer is a public historian and independent scholar who lives in Littleton, Mass. Fuhrer provides research, interpretation, and programs for humanities associations, museums, historical societies, and educational institutions. She specializes in using primary sources to recover everyday lives from the past. Her scholarship has received generous support from the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, the Massachusetts Historical Society, the American Antiquarian Society, and the New England Regional Fellowship Consortium. Fuhrer was recently awarded the Massachusetts History Commendation for 2014 by the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities. She is currently pursuing research on the illness narratives of consumptives (tubercular patients) across gender, class, ethnicity, and race in antebellum New England.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

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History of Women and Gender Seminar Enslaved Women and the Politics of Self-Liberation in Revolutionary North America 2 October 2014.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Location: Schlesinger Library Barbara Krauthamer, University of Massachusetts - Amherst Comment: Kate Masur, Northwestern University This paper examines enslaved women's strategies for gaining freedom through escape. It focuses on ...

This paper examines enslaved women's strategies for gaining freedom through escape. It focuses on enslaved women's escapes from bondage and their concomitant movements to various sites in the Americas from the Revolutionary era through the early decades of the nineteenth century. It also considers the ways in which both enslaved women and slaveholders made sense of the changing political landscape in the late eighteenth-century British Atlantic and African Diaspora.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 4 October 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in World War I."

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Public Program Katherine, Grace, and Mary: Archaeological Revelations of 17th and 18th Century Women from Boston's Big Dig 6 October 2014.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Joe Bagley, Boston City Archaeologist The archaeological surveys conducted prior to the beginning of Boston's infamous Big Dig resulted in ...

A mid-18th century porringer pot by Grace Parker found at the Three Cranes TavernThe archaeological surveys conducted prior to the beginning of Boston's infamous Big Dig resulted in the uncovering of mountains of historical data on Boston's deep history.  Three archaeological sites stand out for their contributions to Women's history in Boston. These include the late 17th century site of Katherine Nanny Naylor, the early 18th century site of Mary Long, and the mid-18th century site of Grace Parker.  Katherine was the first woman to legally divorce her husband in Puritan Massachusetts, Mary was the operator of the Three Cranes Tavern in Charlestown---the cultural and physical heart of the Charlestown community, and Grace owned and operated the most successful ceramic business in Boston producing wears with her distinctive brush strokes.  Together, these three women paint a complicated and nuanced history of Boston that goes far beyond what is typically known or written about women in these periods.  Join City Archaeologist Joe Bagley as he discusses the information uncovered about these three women and their contributions to the history and culture of Boston.

Joe Bagley is the City Archaeologist of Boston.  As a City employee, Joe executed archaeological surveys on city-owned land, reviewed construction and development projects that could impact archaeological sites, and promotes Boston's archaeology through public events and talks.  Joe received his BA in Archaeology from Boston University and his MA in Historical Archaeology from UMass Boston.  He has been conducting archaeological surveys in New England on historic and Native sites for over a dozen years.  He is also the live-in caretaker of the Dorchester Historical Society's William Clapp House where he lives with his wife Jen and his dog, Jack.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

http://www.cityofboston.gov/archaeology/

https://www.facebook.com/BostonArchaeologyProgram

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Early American History Seminar Thomas Jefferson, Lawyer: Property and Personhood in the Law of Slavery 7 October 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required David Konig, Washington University in St. Louis Comment: Malick Ghachem, MIT This paper analyzes the complex relationship between Thomas Jefferson’s legal career and his ...

This paper analyzes the complex relationship between Thomas Jefferson’s legal career and his ownership of slaves. Jefferson used the law to manage people as his property, but he never repudiated their essential personhood. The governmental structure of the day made open political assault on slavery inconceivable, but Jefferson as a lawyer was able to use the legal system to mitigate its harshest features and to lay the foundation for an expanded antislavery jurisprudence in the future.

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Thomas Hutchinson Member Event, Special Event History Revealed: Thomas Hutchinson and the Stamp Act Riots 8 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT. If you would like to be placed on the waiting list, please call 617-646-0518. MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special evening at the Society as John W. Tyler, editor of ...

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special evening at the Society as John W. Tyler, editor of The Correspondence of Thomas Hutchinson: 1740-1766 (2014), relays the story of Lt. Gov. Thomas Hutchinson and how he came to be on the losing side of the American Revolution. His house was destroyed by a mob during the Stamp Act riots, a milestone in the series of acts of civil disobedience that made Boston notorious in the eyes of the British government. A pair of fire tongs salvaged from that evening and now in the collections of the MHS will be on display along with other objects related to Hutchinson and the coming of the American Revolution.

6:00 PM: Reception
6:30 PM: Remarks by John W. Tyler followed by a presentation of items from the Society's collections

Become a Member today!

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Public Program, Author Talk 1914-1918: The War Within the War 9 October 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Adam Hochschild, University of California Berkeley As we mark the centenary of the First World War, this epochal event is usually remembered as a ...

As we mark the centenary of the First World War, this epochal event is usually remembered as a bloody conflict between rival alliances of nations. But there was another struggle within most of those countries: between people who regarded the war as a noble and necessary crusade, and a brave minority who felt it was tragic madness and who refused to fight. Writer Adam Hochschild describes this battle in an illustrated talk, focusing on the country where that tension was sharpest, Great Britain.

Adam HochschildAdam Hochschild’s writing has focused on human rights and social justice. His seven books include King Leopold's Ghost: a Story of Greed, Terror and Heroism in Colonial Africa, which won a J. Anthony Lukas award in the United States, and the Duff Cooper Prize in England. Bury the Chains: Prophets and Rebels in the Fight to Free an Empire’s Slaves was a finalist for the 2005 National Book Award and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. His To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 won the Dayton Literary Peace Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. For the body of his work, he has received awards from the Lannan Foundation, the American Historical Association, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He teaches at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley.

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Special Event, Public Program, Notice MHS Open House - Galleries Open 13 October 2014.Monday, 10:00AM - 3:00PM Join us as part of Opening Our Doors, Boston’s largest single day of free arts and cultural ...

Join us as part of Opening Our Doors, Boston’s largest single day of free arts and cultural events. Stop by to view Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in the First World War. This event is free and open to the public.

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Library Closed, Special Event Columbus Day 13 October 2014.Monday, all day The MHS library is closed on Columbus Day. The exhibition galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 3 ...

The MHS library is closed on Columbus Day. The exhibition galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM.

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Environmental History Seminar Finding Meaning and Debating Value in a Historical Landscape 14 October 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required David Benac, Western Michigan University Victoria Cain, Northeastern University Rural Oregon has shifted from an emphasis on resource extraction to a reliance on ecotourism.   ...

Rural Oregon has shifted from an emphasis on resource extraction to a reliance on ecotourism.  This transition exacerbated a clash of opposing visions of the value of history and the natural world. Competing interpretations of landscape as a resource or as a haven is an old dichotomy in environmental history. This paper adds nuance by employing a third category that intermingles the others: historical significance.

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Brown Bag The Role of the Military within Imperial Security Policy, 1685-1689. 15 October 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Rachael Abbiss, University of Chester The Dominion of New England was established in 1686 by James VII & II. James’s ...

The Dominion of New England was established in 1686 by James VII & II. James’s colonial policy was the first substantial attempt to unite colonies under royal military authority and permanently station regular soldiers in New England. There is limited research pertaining to the military purpose of James’s imperial design, in particular the role, function and contribution of regular troops in controlling and securing New England. This project examines the army and military policy in North America between 1686 and 1689. 

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Public Program Rebels in Vermont!: The St. Albans Raid 15 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm J. Kevin Graffagnino, William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan On October 19, 1864, twenty-two Confederate soldiers under the command of Bennett H. Young attacked ...

Orleans County broadsideOn October 19, 1864, twenty-two Confederate soldiers under the command of Bennett H. Young attacked the village of St. Albans, Vermont.  They robbed the banks in town, tried to set fire to the downtown commercial district, shot and killed one person, and then fled north to Canada with $227,000 in their saddlebags.  The St. Albans Raid sent shock waves throughout the North.  A fraction of the stolen money made its way back to St. Albans, but a series of Canadian trials ended in the dismissal of all charges against Young and his men.  Kevin Graffagnino's "Rebels in Vermont!" presentation details the events of the raid and also looks at the lives and careers of the Confederate participants, providing more of a Southern perspective than most Northern versions of the story.

J. Kevin Graffagnino is Director of the William L. Clements Library of early American history at the University of Michigan.  In a long career, Kevin has been an antiquarian book dealer, special collections curator, library administrator, and Executive Director of the Vermont and Kentucky state historical societies.  He holds two degrees from the University of Vermont and a Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.  Kevin's publications on early American history and bibliophilic topics include 17 books, the most recent of which is The Vermont Difference: Perspectives from the Green Mountain State (2014)

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 18 October 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in World War I."

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Public Program, Author Talk Civil War Boston 21 October 2014.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Barbara Berenson Boston’s black and white abolitionists forged a second American revolution dedicated to ending ...

Boston and the Civil War book coverBoston’s black and white abolitionists forged a second American revolution dedicated to ending slavery and honoring the promise of liberty made in the Declaration of Independence. Before the war, Bostonians were bitterly divided between those who supported the Union and those opposed to its endorsement of slavery. The Fugitive Slave Act brought the horrors of slavery close to home and led many to join the abolitionists. March to war with Boston’s brave soldiers, including the grandson of Patriot Paul Revere and the Fighting Irish. The all-black Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Regiment battled against both slavery and discrimination, while Boston’s women fought tirelessly against slavery and for their own right to be full citizens of the Union. Join local historian and author Barbara F. Berenson on a thrilling and memorable journey through Civil War Boston. 

Barbara F. Berenson is the author of Walking Tours of Civil War Boston: Hub of Abolitionism (2011, 2nd ed. 2014) and co-editor of Breaking Barriers: The Unfinished Story of Women Lawyers and Judges in Massachusetts (2012). A graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School, Barbara works as a senior attorney at the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court.

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Early American History Seminar Popular U.S. Enthusiasm for Latin American Independence, 1810-1825 21 October 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Caitlin A. Fitz, Northwestern University Comment: John Bezis-Selfa, Wheaton College This paper explores the reactions of those in the United States to the independence movements of ...

This paper explores the reactions of those in the United States to the independence movements of Latin American nations in the 1800s. In general, U.S. observers were overjoyed by these movements; however, Massachusetts citizens were less thrilled. This presentation will analyze the national trend and the commonwealth’s deviation from it.

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George Washington portrait by Gullager Exhibitionbegins The Father of His Country Returns to Boston, October 24, 1789 24 October 2014.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Two hundred twenty-five years ago, during his first year in office, President George Washington ...

Two hundred twenty-five years ago, during his first year in office, President George Washington embarked on a month-long tour of New England. Young John Quincy Adams observed the great excitement of people everywhere:

At the present moment they indulge themselves in sentiments of joy, arising/resulting . . . from the gratification of their affection in beholding personally among them, the friend, the benefactor, the father of his Country.

In Boston the president was met by a great procession that paraded beneath a triumphal arch designed by Charles Bulfinch. The MHS holds six portraits of Washington, including a life study by Christian Gullager painted during the New England tour.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 25 October 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led ...

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in World War I."

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar At the Crossroads: Charros, Cowboys, and Capitalists in San Antonio, Texas 28 October 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Laura Barraclough, Yale University Comment: Desirée J. Garcia, Arizona State University This paper examines the practice of charrería (Mexican rodeo) among Mexican immigrant ...

This paper examines the practice of charrería (Mexican rodeo) among Mexican immigrant men in San Antonio from the late 1940s through the early 1970s. The charros claimed an active place for Mexicans in the history of the Southwest – as well as its future. At the same time, however, they reinscribed a gendered and classed vision of ethnic Mexican inclusion: one that privileged middle-class, socially conservative men while marginalizing other, more transformative visions.

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Brown Bag The Power of Women’s Words in Puritan New England: Gossip, Rumor, and Reputation in a Culture of Surveillance 29 October 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Melissa Johnson, University of Michigan This project interrogates the role of gossip and rumor in seventeenth-century New England. It ...

This project interrogates the role of gossip and rumor in seventeenth-century New England. It focuses on words spoken either by or about women as a way to understand both the gendered nature of reputation and the ways in which women’s words shaped a politics of knowledge in early New England. It asks how reputation reflected and defined boundaries of the community and shows that women participated actively in defining Puritan religious culture. This project mines not only the content of rumors but also the networks through which it spread. This approach uncovers the ways that women’s networks constituted alternate sites of community definition and how different kinds of information and modes of transmission were gendered as either “gossip” or “news.”

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Public Program, Special Event Honoring Pauline Maier (1938–2013) 29 October 2014.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   The evening will begin with a reception at 5:30, followed by the talk at 6:00 Gordon S. Wood, Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus, Brown University Professor Pauline Maier’s contributions to the study of American history and to the life of ...

Professor Pauline Maier’s contributions to the study of American history and to the life of the MHS were both of tremendous value to this community. A distinguished historian who authored significant works on the Revolutionary era, Maier shaped—and will continue to shape—the way generations of students and readers view the foundation of American democracy. Join us as Professor Gordon S. Wood pays tribute to a great historian, teacher, and author who was committed to making American history vivid and accessible to all.

Please call 617-646-0560 or click here to register.

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Brown Bag Character Detectives: Female Physiognomists in the Early American Republic 1 August 2014.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Rachel Walker, University of Maryland

This project examines the fraught connection between female beauty, morality, and intelligence in the post-Enlightenment era. It examines how cultural ideas concerning these traits became intertwined by studying the 18th- and 19th-century “science” of physiognomy—a discipline rooted in the notion that an individual could discern a person’s moral and mental characteristics merely by examining his or her facial features. Early Americans discussed male and female physiognomy in distinct ways and used discussions about female appearance to distinguish between the moral and intellectual capacities of men and women. 

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 2 August 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Brown Bag The Labor of Self-Making in New England Mill Women's Poetry 4 August 2014.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Robin Smith, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

One of the most visible and publicly discussed moments in the history of American working women was the entrance of women into the industrial textile mills of New England in the 1830s and 1840s. The figure of the “female operative” or “Lowell mill girl” fostered an unprecedented public interest in the lives and labor of working women, and the mill women seized this opportunity to publicly challenge the obstacles that industrial labor posed to 19th century ideas of humanity and a coherent sense of self. Drawing upon poems and prose pieces written by women mill workers for publication in literary magazines such as The Lowell Offering, I will argue that for mill women, writing poetry was an important means of humanizing potentially dehumanizing labor; through the rhythms of poetry, they reclaimed control of time and in so doing, made space for fortifying their creative, coherent selves.

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Teacher Workshop, Public Program Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 6 August 2014 to 7 August 2014 registration required This event will take place in Searsport, Maine.

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation in 1776? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in New England towns as the United States was attempting to form a new government in the 1780s and 1790s. We will discuss the truly participatory, well-informed conversations taking place in town halls and meeting places throughout the new colonies-turned-states. By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story.

Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • investigate what it was like to live in an old town in a new country and discover what changed for the inhabitants of different towns as new government structures were implemented.
  • discuss the concerns (both local and national) expressed by Massachusetts & New Hampshire residents in various towns while the American government was being created in the years after the revolution.
  • explore the ways in which geography, economy, and social/cultural practices influenced local concerns.
  • discover evidence of local concerns, and discussions of national policies, in primary sources held by local repositories and the Massachusetts Historical Society.
  • explore new ways of engaging students and local communities in their history.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

Additional two-day workshops will be held in Pepperell, Massachusetts & Milford, New Hampshire, July 30-31; in Falmouth, Massachusetts, August 13-14; and in Framingham, Massachusetts, September 26-27.

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Brown Bag "The Day of Sainthood Has Passed": American Abolitionists and the Golden Moment of the Civil War, 1861-1865 6 August 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Frank Cirillo, University of Virginia

This project explores the divisions among American abolitionists over whether or not to support the Lincoln Administration and the Union war effort during the Civil War. The choices that longtime reformers made in confronting the changed landscape of wartime America, and the series of schisms within the movement that ensued, helps to explain how the Union war achieved both so much and so little in terms of black social and political rights.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 9 August 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Teacher Workshop, Public Program Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 13 August 2014 to 14 August 2014 registration required This event will take place in Falmouth, Massachusetts.

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation after the Revolution? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop -- offered in conjunction with the Falmouth Museums on the Green -- will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in New England towns like Falmouth as the United States was becoming a new nation in the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries.  By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story.

Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • investigate what it was like to live in an old town in a new country and discover what changed for the inhabitants of Falmouth and Cape Cod as new government structures were implemented.
  • discuss the concerns (both local and national) expressed by Massachusetts residents while the American government was being created in the years after the revolution.
  • explore the ways in which geography, economy, and social/cultural practices influenced local concerns.
  • discover evidence of local concerns, and discussions of national policies, in primary sources held by the Falmouth Historical Society and the Massachusetts Historical Society.
  • explore new ways of engaging students and local communities in their history.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

Additional two-day workshops will be held in Pepperell, Massachusetts & Milford, New Hampshire, July 30-31; in Searsport, Maine, August 6-7; and in Framingham, Massachusetts, September 26-27.

Image: Fracis Wicks House, c. 1790. Falmouth Museum on the Green.

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Brown Bag Military Wives in Eighteenth-Century Boston 13 August 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Serena Zabin, Carleton College

When British troops came to Boston in 1768, hundreds of army wives and children came with them. At the time, Boston newspapers exclaimed in horror at the arrival of these army women, referring to them as the “dregs and refuse of all nations.” Yet tantalizing hints in the diaries of Massachusetts militia and provincial soldiers suggest that during the campaigns in 1745 to Louisburg and throughout the Seven Years War, women may have occasionally also accompanied Massachusetts troops. If so, some Boston women may themselves have once been military wives, a possibility that no historian has ever considered, and one that might explain some of the relationships that came to develop between British regulars and Boston civilians in the months preceding the Boston Massacre.

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Brown Bag The Death and Transfiguration of New England Psalmody, ca. 1790-1860 15 August 2014.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Brenton Grom, Case Western Reserve University

 

The robust culture of psalm- and hymn-singing that flourished in Revolutionary New England became subject to Europeanizing reforms after the turn of the nineteenth century. Introducing these reform efforts as instances of political and theological ideology operating within a larger discourse of refinement, this presentation focuses on their surprisingly variable reception as revealed in copybooks and marginalia. It furthermore considers Victorian values of home, sentiment, and historical memory as masks for the retention of outmoded musical styles in later years.

 

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 16 August 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Brown Bag Operating Outside of Empire: Trade and Citizenship in the Atlantic World, 1756-1812 18 August 2014.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Mark Dragoni, Syracuse University

This project examines merchants operating at the edge of empire and the competing discourses on trade, cosmopolitanism, and neutrality that statesmen, philosophers, and merchants mobilized. Under increasing demands for consumer goods, states were willing to bend supposedly strict mercantilist regulations to guarantee the steady supply of commodities in the metropole. This program will look at Samuel Cabot's and John and Jonathan Amory's participation in this often illicit, yet highly profitable transatlantic carrying trade during the foundational period for modern citizenship and increasing state regulation.

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Brown Bag Ten Years of Winter: The Cold Decade and Environmental Consciousness in the Early 19th Century 22 August 2014.Friday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Sean Munger, University of Oregon

Between 1810 and 1820, a series of volcanic eruptions around the world caused a temporary global climate change with dramatic effects, the most famous of them being the "Year Without Summer" (1816). This research attempts to understand how people in the English-speaking world understood and evaluated these anomalies, and what their reactions tell us about the state of scientific thinking, environmental consciousness, and how their worlds—both global and local—were constructed.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 23 August 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Building Closed Labor Day 30 August 2014.Saturday, all day

The MHS library and galleries will be closed Labor Day weekend.

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Building Closed Labor Day 1 September 2014.Monday, all day

The MHS library and galleries will be closed Labor Day weekend.

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Notice Library Hours Changing: No Tuesday evening hours 2 September 2014.Tuesday, all day

Beginning 2 September 2014 the MHS library will no longer be open on Tuesday evenings. The new library hours will be:

9:00 AM - 4:45 PM Mon. - Fri.
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM Sat.

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Brown Bag Unspeakable Loss: North America’s Invisible Throat Distemper Epidemic of 1735–1765 3 September 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Nicholas Bonneau, University of Notre Dame

While the New England throat distemper epidemic never achieved the notoriety acquired by other more notorious diseases of the colonial era, no single epidemic of that period proved more deadly to European settlers. This project asks why this epidemic escaped comment by contemporaries and past historians while raising interpretive questions informing our larger views of change, the priority of documentation, and the role of memory. 

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Brown Bag Sculpting the Citizen Soldier: Civil War Memory and the Life Cycle of Monuments 10 September 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Sarah Beetham, University of Delaware

Do monuments hold their meaning over time? In this talk, Dr. Beetham will explore how Civil War citizen soldier monuments have factored into community life in the century and a half since the war’s end. Soldier monuments have been interpreted and interpreted, vandalized and hit by cars, amended and moved to new locations. How do these interventions affect our understanding of post-Civil War memory?

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Special Event MHS Graduate Student Reception 18 September 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM this event is free

All graduate students in American history and related subjects are invited to attend. Faculty members in these fields are also welcome.

Begin the new academic year by meeting graduate students and faculty from other universities who are also working in your field. Enjoy refreshments, take a tour of MHS departments, and learn about the range of resources available to support your work, including MHS fellowship programs. Refreshments and networking begin at 6:00 p.m. and run throughout the evening. Program begins at 6:30 p.m.

No charge. RSVP required by September 17. Email kviens@masshist.org or phone 617-646-0568 with your name and affiliation. Indicate whether you are a graduate student or faculty member.

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar The Importance of Place and Place-makers in the Life of a Los Angeles Community: What Gentrification Erases from Echo Park, 1950s-Present 23 September 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Natalia Molina, University of California - San Diego Comment: Judith Smith, University of Massachusetts - Boston

This talk examines a Los Angeles neighborhood, Echo Park, and discusses its history, shaped by its Leftist, Communist, and gay residents.  Beginning in the 1950s and 60s, this neighborhood’s history of progressive politics left a legacy for a wave of Mexican immigrants, allowing them to create a community that reached across social boundaries. The paper looks at Echo Park today to examine this gentrifying area and ask what the role of history is in the neighborhood’s evolving identity.

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Teacher Workshop, Public Program Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 26 September 2014 to 27 September 2014 registration required This event will take place at the Framingham History Center.

What was it like to live in a town that had existed for years (if not a full century or more) before becoming part of a new nation in 1776? Designed for educators and local history enthusiasts, this workshop will explore some of the social, cultural, economic, and political concerns expressed in Framingham and other nearby towns as the Americans attempted to create a new nation in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. By turning an eye towards local politics and events we will rediscover the ways in which “ordinary people” contributed to America’s creation story.

Presenters include Jayne Gordon and Kathleen Barker of the Massachusetts Historical Society  Department of Education and Public Programs; Dean Eastman, educational consultant and co-creator of primaryresearch.org; Kevin Swope, FHC Board Chair; local storyteller Libby Franck and others…

To Register
Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Richard Saltonstall Charitable Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 27 September 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. It begins at 10:00AM. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in World War I." 

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Brown Bag Reading Locke on the Plantation 1 October 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Sean Moore, University of New Hampshire

This talk will extend into book history Edmund Morgan’s articulation of the well-known paradox that some early Americans were asserting their own desire for freedom from Britain while simultaneously enslaving others. Considering Locke’s political theory, it will examine how the African diaspora underwrote the dissemination of books of British literature and philosophy, and how Jefferson, Washington, and others bartered slave-produced goods for books through the London agents with whom they did business.

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Public Program, Author Talk The Trials of Old New England Towns in a New Nation 1 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Mary Fuhrer, Independent Scholar

Mary White, circa 1840. Courtesy Boylston Historical Society.We tend to think of New England towns in the first decades of the 19th century as peaceful, bucolic havens -- they were not. In this talk, Mary Babson Fuhrer will discuss the remarkable stories of conflict and transformation that reshaped local communities in the decades leading up to the Civil War. As people struggled to work out the promises of the Revolution on the personal level, contrary ideals of community identity and individual interests clashed, until, as one observer noted, "the most malignant passions of our depraved natures raged." The diaries, letters, and account books she draws on form the basis of her recent book, Crisis of Community: Trials and Transformation of a New England Town, 1815-1848.

Mary Babson Fuhrer is a public historian and independent scholar who lives in Littleton, Mass. Fuhrer provides research, interpretation, and programs for humanities associations, museums, historical societies, and educational institutions. She specializes in using primary sources to recover everyday lives from the past. Her scholarship has received generous support from the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, the Massachusetts Historical Society, the American Antiquarian Society, and the New England Regional Fellowship Consortium. Fuhrer was recently awarded the Massachusetts History Commendation for 2014 by the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities. She is currently pursuing research on the illness narratives of consumptives (tubercular patients) across gender, class, ethnicity, and race in antebellum New England.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

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History of Women and Gender Seminar Enslaved Women and the Politics of Self-Liberation in Revolutionary North America 2 October 2014.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Location: Schlesinger Library Barbara Krauthamer, University of Massachusetts - Amherst Comment: Kate Masur, Northwestern University

This paper examines enslaved women's strategies for gaining freedom through escape. It focuses on enslaved women's escapes from bondage and their concomitant movements to various sites in the Americas from the Revolutionary era through the early decades of the nineteenth century. It also considers the ways in which both enslaved women and slaveholders made sense of the changing political landscape in the late eighteenth-century British Atlantic and African Diaspora.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 4 October 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in World War I."

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Public Program Katherine, Grace, and Mary: Archaeological Revelations of 17th and 18th Century Women from Boston's Big Dig 6 October 2014.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required There is a pre-talk reception at 5:30 Joe Bagley, Boston City Archaeologist

A mid-18th century porringer pot by Grace Parker found at the Three Cranes TavernThe archaeological surveys conducted prior to the beginning of Boston's infamous Big Dig resulted in the uncovering of mountains of historical data on Boston's deep history.  Three archaeological sites stand out for their contributions to Women's history in Boston. These include the late 17th century site of Katherine Nanny Naylor, the early 18th century site of Mary Long, and the mid-18th century site of Grace Parker.  Katherine was the first woman to legally divorce her husband in Puritan Massachusetts, Mary was the operator of the Three Cranes Tavern in Charlestown---the cultural and physical heart of the Charlestown community, and Grace owned and operated the most successful ceramic business in Boston producing wears with her distinctive brush strokes.  Together, these three women paint a complicated and nuanced history of Boston that goes far beyond what is typically known or written about women in these periods.  Join City Archaeologist Joe Bagley as he discusses the information uncovered about these three women and their contributions to the history and culture of Boston.

Joe Bagley is the City Archaeologist of Boston.  As a City employee, Joe executed archaeological surveys on city-owned land, reviewed construction and development projects that could impact archaeological sites, and promotes Boston's archaeology through public events and talks.  Joe received his BA in Archaeology from Boston University and his MA in Historical Archaeology from UMass Boston.  He has been conducting archaeological surveys in New England on historic and Native sites for over a dozen years.  He is also the live-in caretaker of the Dorchester Historical Society's William Clapp House where he lives with his wife Jen and his dog, Jack.

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

http://www.cityofboston.gov/archaeology/

https://www.facebook.com/BostonArchaeologyProgram

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Early American History Seminar Thomas Jefferson, Lawyer: Property and Personhood in the Law of Slavery 7 October 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
David Konig, Washington University in St. Louis Comment: Malick Ghachem, MIT

This paper analyzes the complex relationship between Thomas Jefferson’s legal career and his ownership of slaves. Jefferson used the law to manage people as his property, but he never repudiated their essential personhood. The governmental structure of the day made open political assault on slavery inconceivable, but Jefferson as a lawyer was able to use the legal system to mitigate its harshest features and to lay the foundation for an expanded antislavery jurisprudence in the future.

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Member Event, Special Event History Revealed: Thomas Hutchinson and the Stamp Act Riots 8 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM registration required at no cost THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT. If you would like to be placed on the waiting list, please call 617-646-0518. Thomas Hutchinson

MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special evening at the Society as John W. Tyler, editor of The Correspondence of Thomas Hutchinson: 1740-1766 (2014), relays the story of Lt. Gov. Thomas Hutchinson and how he came to be on the losing side of the American Revolution. His house was destroyed by a mob during the Stamp Act riots, a milestone in the series of acts of civil disobedience that made Boston notorious in the eyes of the British government. A pair of fire tongs salvaged from that evening and now in the collections of the MHS will be on display along with other objects related to Hutchinson and the coming of the American Revolution.

6:00 PM: Reception
6:30 PM: Remarks by John W. Tyler followed by a presentation of items from the Society's collections

Become a Member today!

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Public Program, Author Talk 1914-1918: The War Within the War 9 October 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm Adam Hochschild, University of California Berkeley

As we mark the centenary of the First World War, this epochal event is usually remembered as a bloody conflict between rival alliances of nations. But there was another struggle within most of those countries: between people who regarded the war as a noble and necessary crusade, and a brave minority who felt it was tragic madness and who refused to fight. Writer Adam Hochschild describes this battle in an illustrated talk, focusing on the country where that tension was sharpest, Great Britain.

Adam HochschildAdam Hochschild’s writing has focused on human rights and social justice. His seven books include King Leopold's Ghost: a Story of Greed, Terror and Heroism in Colonial Africa, which won a J. Anthony Lukas award in the United States, and the Duff Cooper Prize in England. Bury the Chains: Prophets and Rebels in the Fight to Free an Empire’s Slaves was a finalist for the 2005 National Book Award and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. His To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 won the Dayton Literary Peace Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. For the body of his work, he has received awards from the Lannan Foundation, the American Historical Association, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He teaches at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley.

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Special Event, Public Program, Notice MHS Open House - Galleries Open 13 October 2014.Monday, 10:00AM - 3:00PM

Join us as part of Opening Our Doors, Boston’s largest single day of free arts and cultural events. Stop by to view Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in the First World War. This event is free and open to the public.

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Library Closed, Special Event Columbus Day 13 October 2014.Monday, all day

The MHS library is closed on Columbus Day. The exhibition galleries will be open from 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM.

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Environmental History Seminar Finding Meaning and Debating Value in a Historical Landscape 14 October 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
David Benac, Western Michigan University Victoria Cain, Northeastern University

Rural Oregon has shifted from an emphasis on resource extraction to a reliance on ecotourism.  This transition exacerbated a clash of opposing visions of the value of history and the natural world. Competing interpretations of landscape as a resource or as a haven is an old dichotomy in environmental history. This paper adds nuance by employing a third category that intermingles the others: historical significance.

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Brown Bag The Role of the Military within Imperial Security Policy, 1685-1689. 15 October 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Rachael Abbiss, University of Chester

The Dominion of New England was established in 1686 by James VII & II. James’s colonial policy was the first substantial attempt to unite colonies under royal military authority and permanently station regular soldiers in New England. There is limited research pertaining to the military purpose of James’s imperial design, in particular the role, function and contribution of regular troops in controlling and securing New England. This project examines the army and military policy in North America between 1686 and 1689. 

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Public Program Rebels in Vermont!: The St. Albans Raid 15 October 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30pm J. Kevin Graffagnino, William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan

Orleans County broadsideOn October 19, 1864, twenty-two Confederate soldiers under the command of Bennett H. Young attacked the village of St. Albans, Vermont.  They robbed the banks in town, tried to set fire to the downtown commercial district, shot and killed one person, and then fled north to Canada with $227,000 in their saddlebags.  The St. Albans Raid sent shock waves throughout the North.  A fraction of the stolen money made its way back to St. Albans, but a series of Canadian trials ended in the dismissal of all charges against Young and his men.  Kevin Graffagnino's "Rebels in Vermont!" presentation details the events of the raid and also looks at the lives and careers of the Confederate participants, providing more of a Southern perspective than most Northern versions of the story.

J. Kevin Graffagnino is Director of the William L. Clements Library of early American history at the University of Michigan.  In a long career, Kevin has been an antiquarian book dealer, special collections curator, library administrator, and Executive Director of the Vermont and Kentucky state historical societies.  He holds two degrees from the University of Vermont and a Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.  Kevin's publications on early American history and bibliophilic topics include 17 books, the most recent of which is The Vermont Difference: Perspectives from the Green Mountain State (2014)

There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617- 646-0560 or click here to register.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 18 October 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in World War I."

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Public Program, Author Talk Civil War Boston 21 October 2014.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Barbara Berenson

Boston and the Civil War book coverBoston’s black and white abolitionists forged a second American revolution dedicated to ending slavery and honoring the promise of liberty made in the Declaration of Independence. Before the war, Bostonians were bitterly divided between those who supported the Union and those opposed to its endorsement of slavery. The Fugitive Slave Act brought the horrors of slavery close to home and led many to join the abolitionists. March to war with Boston’s brave soldiers, including the grandson of Patriot Paul Revere and the Fighting Irish. The all-black Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Regiment battled against both slavery and discrimination, while Boston’s women fought tirelessly against slavery and for their own right to be full citizens of the Union. Join local historian and author Barbara F. Berenson on a thrilling and memorable journey through Civil War Boston. 

Barbara F. Berenson is the author of Walking Tours of Civil War Boston: Hub of Abolitionism (2011, 2nd ed. 2014) and co-editor of Breaking Barriers: The Unfinished Story of Women Lawyers and Judges in Massachusetts (2012). A graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School, Barbara works as a senior attorney at the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court.

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Early American History Seminar Popular U.S. Enthusiasm for Latin American Independence, 1810-1825 21 October 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Caitlin A. Fitz, Northwestern University Comment: John Bezis-Selfa, Wheaton College

This paper explores the reactions of those in the United States to the independence movements of Latin American nations in the 1800s. In general, U.S. observers were overjoyed by these movements; however, Massachusetts citizens were less thrilled. This presentation will analyze the national trend and the commonwealth’s deviation from it.

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Exhibition The Father of His Country Returns to Boston, October 24, 1789 24 October 2014 to 31 December 2014 this event is free Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM George Washington portrait by Gullager

Two hundred twenty-five years ago, during his first year in office, President George Washington embarked on a month-long tour of New England. Young John Quincy Adams observed the great excitement of people everywhere:

At the present moment they indulge themselves in sentiments of joy, arising/resulting . . . from the gratification of their affection in beholding personally among them, the friend, the benefactor, the father of his Country.

In Boston the president was met by a great procession that paraded beneath a triumphal arch designed by Charles Bulfinch. The MHS holds six portraits of Washington, including a life study by Christian Gullager painted during the New England tour.

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MHS Tour The History and Collections of the MHS 25 October 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

The History and Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Tour is a 90-minute docent-led walk through our public rooms. The tour is free, open to the public, with no need for reservations. If you would like to bring a larger party (8 or more), please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

While you're here you will also have the opportunity to view our current exhibition, "Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country: Massachusetts Women in World War I."

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar At the Crossroads: Charros, Cowboys, and Capitalists in San Antonio, Texas 28 October 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Laura Barraclough, Yale University Comment: Desirée J. Garcia, Arizona State University

This paper examines the practice of charrería (Mexican rodeo) among Mexican immigrant men in San Antonio from the late 1940s through the early 1970s. The charros claimed an active place for Mexicans in the history of the Southwest – as well as its future. At the same time, however, they reinscribed a gendered and classed vision of ethnic Mexican inclusion: one that privileged middle-class, socially conservative men while marginalizing other, more transformative visions.

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Brown Bag The Power of Women’s Words in Puritan New England: Gossip, Rumor, and Reputation in a Culture of Surveillance 29 October 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Melissa Johnson, University of Michigan

This project interrogates the role of gossip and rumor in seventeenth-century New England. It focuses on words spoken either by or about women as a way to understand both the gendered nature of reputation and the ways in which women’s words shaped a politics of knowledge in early New England. It asks how reputation reflected and defined boundaries of the community and shows that women participated actively in defining Puritan religious culture. This project mines not only the content of rumors but also the networks through which it spread. This approach uncovers the ways that women’s networks constituted alternate sites of community definition and how different kinds of information and modes of transmission were gendered as either “gossip” or “news.”

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Public Program, Special Event Honoring Pauline Maier (1938–2013) 29 October 2014.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost The evening will begin with a reception at 5:30, followed by the talk at 6:00 Gordon S. Wood, Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus, Brown University

Professor Pauline Maier’s contributions to the study of American history and to the life of the MHS were both of tremendous value to this community. A distinguished historian who authored significant works on the Revolutionary era, Maier shaped—and will continue to shape—the way generations of students and readers view the foundation of American democracy. Join us as Professor Gordon S. Wood pays tribute to a great historian, teacher, and author who was committed to making American history vivid and accessible to all.

Please call 617-646-0560 or click here to register.

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