Exhibitions & Ongoing Events

Exhibition Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial this event is free 21 February 2014 to 23 May 2014 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM details
this event is free Exhibition

Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial

21 February 2014 to 23 May 2014 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Shaw MemorialIn commemoration of the Civil War battle of Fort Wagner led by Colonel Robert Gould Shaw and the men of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment and in cooperation with the Massachusetts Historical Society, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. has organized the exhibition Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ Shaw Memorial.

The exhibition celebrates Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ magisterial Shaw Memorial (1883–1900). When Saint-Gaudens created the monument, he based his likeness of Shaw on photographs of the colonel, but for his depiction of the other soldiers, he hired African American men to pose in his studio. This exhibition seeks to make real the soldiers of the 54th represented anonymously in the memorial. It brings together vintage photographic portraits of members of the regiment and of the men and women who recruited, nursed, taught, and guided them.

Throughout the run of the exhibition special programs are planned in cooperation with the Museum of African American History, the Boston African American National Historic Site, the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment Company A, and the Friends of the Public Garden.

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April 2014

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  • Public Program, Author TalkAmerican Jews & America’s Game
    Public Program, Author TalkAmerican Jews & America’s Game
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Larry Ruttman

    Larry Ruttman will discuss his book, as well as the revealing lives of the men who played, managed, and wrote about America's national pastime over the last century.

    this event is free details
  • Early American History SeminarFrom "Disturbers" to Protectors of the Peace: Baptist Church Discip...
    Early American History SeminarFrom "Disturbers" to Protectors of the Peace: Baptist Church Discipline and Legalities on the Trans-Appalachian Frontier
    5:15 PM - 7:30 PM Jeff Perry, Purdue University Comment: Stephen A. Marini, Wellesley College

    The Baptist church was an important site for the production of localized law in early America. This paper considers how the instability engendered by the missionary movement and the rise of competing religious sects impacted individual churches’ vision of their own authority and their role in regulating their wider communities.  In so doing, it speaks to the constantly changing nature of secular and religious authority in the United States.

    Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
    Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
    details
  • Brown BagLiberal Religion and Slavery in America, 1775-1865
    Brown BagLiberal Religion and Slavery in America, 1775-1865
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Christopher Cameron, University of North Carolina at Charlotte this event is free details
  • Public ProgramCreated Equal
    Public ProgramCreated Equal: Slavery by Another Name & The Freedom Riders
    5:30 PM - 7:30 PM Film Screening & Discussion Facilitated by Joanne Pope Melish, University of Kentucky Please RSVP   free eventregistration required at no cost details
  • History of Women and Gender Seminar"Talents Committed to Your Care": Reading and Writing Antislavery
    History of Women and Gender Seminar"Talents Committed to Your Care": Reading and Writing Antislavery
    5:30 PM - 7:00 PM Mary Kelley, University of Michigan Comment: Elizabeth Maddock Dillon, Northeastern University

    “Talents Committed to Your Care” takes as its subject reading and writing practices in America’s newly independent America. This project explores the historically contingent identities and the material texts that men and women produced in and through their engagement with a remarkably rich transatlantic literary culture. In looking not only at the cultivation of individual identities but also at the establishment of collective ties, it will be measuring the degree to which gender played a foundational role.

    Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
    Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
    details
    • MHS TourMHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS
      MHS TourMHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS
      10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

      Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

      this event is free details
    6 7 8 9 10 11 12
        • Environmental History SeminarA Mountain in Winter: Wilderness Politics, Economic Development, an...
          Environmental History SeminarA Mountain in Winter: Wilderness Politics, Economic Development, and the Transformation of Whiteface Mountain into a Modern Ski Center, 1932-1980
          5:15 PM - 7:30 PM Jonathan D. Anzalone, Stony Brook University Comment: Jim O’Connell, National Park Service

          This paper examines the development of Whiteface Mountain as a skiing spot within the broader context of the Adirondack Park’s transformation into a playground for the masses.  Wilderness politics, class divisions, and the vicissitudes of nature combined to frustrate administrators and strain their relationship with business leaders, winter sports enthusiasts, and wilderness advocates. The debate sheds brighter light on disparate interpretations of modern recreation and economic development.

          Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
          Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
          details
              • MHS TourMHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS
                MHS TourMHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS
                10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

                Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

                this event is free details
              13 14 15 16 17 18 19
                  • History of Women and Gender Seminar"How can the wife submit?" African Families Negotiate Gender and Sl...
                    History of Women and Gender Seminar"How can the wife submit?" African Families Negotiate Gender and Slavery in New England
                    5:30 PM - 7:00 PM Location: Schlesinger Library Gloria Whiting, Harvard University Comment: Barbara Krauthamer, University of Massachusetts—Amherst

                    Rescheduled from February 13, 2014.

                    This paper discusses various ways in which the everyday realities of slavery shaped gender relations in Afro-New England families. While the structure of slave families in the region was unusually matrifocal, these families nonetheless exhibited a number of patriarchal tendencies. Enslaved African families in New England therefore complicate the assumption of much scholarship that the structure of slave families defined their normative values.

                    Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

                    Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

                    Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                    Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                    details
                        20 21 22 23 24 25 26
                          • Building ClosedPatriot's Day
                            Building ClosedPatriot's Day
                            all day

                            The MHS is closed for Patriot's Day.

                            details
                          • Teacher WorkshopCanceled: Tell it with Pride
                            begins Canceled:
                            Teacher WorkshopTell it With Pride: A Workshop for Educators
                            22 April 2014 to 23 April 2014 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM this event requires a feeregistration required details
                          • Teacher WorkshopCanceled: Tell it with Pride
                            ends Canceled:
                            Teacher WorkshopTell it With Pride: A Workshop for Educators
                            9:00 AM - 3:00 PM this event requires a feeregistration required details
                          • Brown Bag"Pious Females" and "Good Schools": Transnational Networks of Educa...
                            Brown Bag"Pious Females" and "Good Schools": Transnational Networks of Education in Nineteenth-Century Liberia
                            12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Marie Stango, University of Michigan this event is free details
                          • Public ProgramDr. Zabdiel Boylston Adams
                            Public ProgramDr. Zabdiel Boylston Adams: Surgeon & Soldier for the Union
                            6:00 PM - 7:30 PM Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm Mitchell L. Adams

                            A man at the nexus of two distinguished New England families—Boylston and Adams—at a particularly dramatic moment in history, Dr. Zabdiel Boylston Adams is more than an ancestor or historical figure; to his great-grandson, Mitchell L. Adams, he is a legend.

                            Please RSVP   free eventregistration required at no cost details
                            • Public ProgramGallery Talk
                              Public ProgramGallery Talk
                              2:00 PM - 3:00 PM this event is free details
                            • MHS TourMHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS
                              MHS TourMHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS
                              10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

                              Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

                              this event is free details
                            27 28 29 30
                                • Immigration and Urban History SeminarPanel Discussion: American Catholics and U.S. Immigration Policy be...
                                  Immigration and Urban History SeminarPanel Discussion: American Catholics and U.S. Immigration Policy before the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965
                                  5:15 PM - 7:30 PM Danielle Battisti, University of Nebraska, Gráinne McEvoy, Boston College Comment: Justin Poché, College of the Holy Cross

                                  McEvoy’s paper, “‘A Christian and Democratic Attitude’: The Catholic Campaign for Education and Enlightenment on U.S. Immigration Policy, 1952-1957,” examines the Catholic campaign for comprehensive immigration reform during and in the wake of the McCarran-Walter Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, which removed discrimination on the basis of race from federal immigration policy but retained the national origins quota system. Battisti’s essay, “‘Whom Shall We Welcome?’ Italian Americans and Immigration Reform Campaigns, 1948-1965,” examines the efforts of Italian Americans who both assisted Italian immigrants to the U.S. after World War II and who joined in a broader movement to abolish the national origins system and thereby reform the nation’s immigration policies in the 1950s and 1960s.

                                  Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

                                  Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

                                  Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                  Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                  details
                                • Author Talk, Public ProgramJefferson & Hamilton
                                  Author Talk, Public ProgramJefferson & Hamilton: The Rivalry that Forged a Nation
                                  6:00 PM - 7:30 PM Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm John Ferling Annual Jefferson Lecture

                                  Jefferson and Hamilton is the story of the fierce struggle—both public and, ultimately, bitterly personal—between two titans. Join us as we explore their complicated rivalry.

                                  Please RSVP   this event requires a feeregistration required details
                                this event is free Exhibition

                                Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial

                                21 February 2014 to 23 May 2014 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
                                Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

                                Shaw MemorialIn commemoration of the Civil War battle of Fort Wagner led by Colonel Robert Gould Shaw and the men of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment and in cooperation with the Massachusetts Historical Society, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. has organized the exhibition Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ Shaw Memorial.

                                The exhibition celebrates Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ magisterial Shaw Memorial (1883–1900). When Saint-Gaudens created the monument, he based his likeness of Shaw on photographs of the colonel, but for his depiction of the other soldiers, he hired African American men to pose in his studio. This exhibition seeks to make real the soldiers of the 54th represented anonymously in the memorial. It brings together vintage photographic portraits of members of the regiment and of the men and women who recruited, nursed, taught, and guided them.

                                Throughout the run of the exhibition special programs are planned in cooperation with the Museum of African American History, the Boston African American National Historic Site, the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment Company A, and the Friends of the Public Garden.

                                1 April 2014 this event is free Public Program, Author Talk

                                American Jews & America’s Game

                                12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
                                Larry Ruttman

                                Larry Ruttman will discuss the four main subjects of his book: baseball; American Jewish life in the United States over the last century; American history; and the revealing personal lives of people involved with the game. Compiled using oral histories gathered from nearly 50 Jewish baseball luminaries (who served the game both on and off the field), Ruttman's book offers an anecdotal study of American Jews and the fellow citizens with whom they interacted during momentous times for America, set against the backdrop of a quintessentially American game that fascinates us all.

                                Larry Ruttman, Fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society, is the author of Voices of Brookline, a national finalist for the Award of Merit of the American Association of State and Local History. He has practiced law in Boston for more than fifty years and produces and hosts a television interview show in his hometown of Brookline, Massachusetts.

                                To Reserve: This event is free and open to the public.

                                1 April 2014 Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                Early American History Seminar

                                From "Disturbers" to Protectors of the Peace: Baptist Church Discipline and Legalities on the Trans-Appalachian Frontier

                                5:15 PM - 7:30 PM
                                Jeff Perry, Purdue University Comment: Stephen A. Marini, Wellesley College

                                Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

                                Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

                                2 April 2014 this event is free Brown Bag

                                Liberal Religion and Slavery in America, 1775-1865

                                12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
                                Christopher Cameron, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

                                This talk will explore the disparate ways that liberal ministers engaged with the institution of slavery, whether as proslavery thinkers, colonizationists, or radical abolitionists. It will examine the theological underpinnings of liberals' views on slavery, as well as the differences between Unitarian, Universalist, and Transcendentalists' engagement with the institution.

                                2 April 2014 Please RSVP   free eventregistration required at no cost Public Program

                                Created Equal: Slavery by Another Name & The Freedom Riders

                                5:30 PM - 7:30 PM
                                Film Screening & Discussion Facilitated by Joanne Pope Melish, University of Kentucky

                                Based on the Pulitzer Prize–winning book by Douglas Blackmon, Slavery by Another Name tells the stories of men, charged with crimes and often guilty of nothing, who were bought, sold, abused, and subjected to deadly working conditions. Raymond Arsenault’s 2007 book Freedom Riders served as the basis for the film of the same name, which tells the terrifying, moving, and suspenseful story of a time when white and black volunteers riding a bus into the Deep South risked being jailed, beaten, or killed, as white local and state authorities ignored or encouraged violent attacks. Clips from the two films will be shown, and they can be viewed online in their entirety at: createdequal.neh.gov.

                                Joanne Pope Melish is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Kentucky and a visiting scholar in American Studies at Brown University. She is the author of Disowning Slavery: Gradual Emancipation and “Race” in New England, 1780-1860.

                                To Reserve: Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

                                Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

                                3 April 2014 Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                History of Women and Gender Seminar

                                "Talents Committed to Your Care": Reading and Writing Antislavery

                                5:30 PM - 7:00 PM
                                Mary Kelley, University of Michigan Comment: Elizabeth Maddock Dillon, Northeastern University

                                Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

                                Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

                                5 April 2014 this event is free MHS Tour

                                MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS

                                10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

                                Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

                                The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

                                Free and open to the public.

                                8 April 2014 Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                Environmental History Seminar

                                A Mountain in Winter: Wilderness Politics, Economic Development, and the Transformation of Whiteface Mountain into a Modern Ski Center, 1932-1980

                                5:15 PM - 7:30 PM
                                Jonathan D. Anzalone, Stony Brook University Comment: Jim O’Connell, National Park Service

                                Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

                                Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

                                12 April 2014 this event is free MHS Tour

                                MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS

                                10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

                                Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

                                The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

                                Free and open to the public.

                                15 April 2014 Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                History of Women and Gender Seminar

                                "How can the wife submit?" African Families Negotiate Gender and Slavery in New England

                                5:30 PM - 7:00 PM
                                Location: Schlesinger Library Gloria Whiting, Harvard University Comment: Barbara Krauthamer, University of Massachusetts—Amherst

                                Rescheduled from February 13, 2014.

                                This paper discusses various ways in which the everyday realities of slavery shaped gender relations in Afro-New England families. While the structure of slave families in the region was unusually matrifocal, these families nonetheless exhibited a number of patriarchal tendencies. Enslaved African families in New England therefore complicate the assumption of much scholarship that the structure of slave families defined their normative values.

                                18 April 2014 this event is free Public Program, Exhibition

                                The Battles of the 54th: Northern Racism and the Unequal Pay Crisis

                                2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
                                Gallery Talk Samantha Anderson Grangaard, Northeastern University

                                When Massachusetts Governor John A. Andrew proposed to raise the first military unit consisting of black soldiers during the Civil War, he was assured by Secretary of War Edwin Stanton that the men would be paid, clothed, and treated in the same way as white troops. As the recruiting posters and newspaper advertisements stated, this included a state bounty and a monthly pay of $13. In July of 1863, an order was issued in Washington fixing the compensation of black soldiers at the laborers' rate of $10 per month. This amount was offered on several occasions to the men of the 54th, but was continually refused. Governor Andrew and the Massachusetts legislature, feeling responsible for the $3 discrepancy in pay promised to the troops, passed an act in November of 1863 providing the difference from state funds. The men refused to accept this resolution, however, demanding that they receive full soldier pay from the federal government.

                                Learn more about this pay controvery, and how it was resolved, through items on display in our current exhibition Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial.

                                21 April 2014 Building Closed

                                Patriot's Day

                                all day

                                The MHS is closed for Patriot's Day.

                                this event requires a feeregistration required Teacher Workshop

                                Canceled:
                                Tell it With Pride: A Workshop for Educators

                                22 April 2014 to 23 April 2014 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM

                                This event has been canceled. Please contact the education department for more information: education@masshist.org or 617-646-0557.

                                Join us as we explore the role of African Americans in Massachusetts in the era of the Civil War!

                                Day one (April 22) will take place at the Massachusetts Historical Society, where participants can view original documents and artifacts that shed light on the antislavery movement, the work of the 54th Regiment and its supporters, and the creation of Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ memorial on Beacon Street.

                                Day two (April 23) will take place on Beacon Hill. In the morning, we will take a walking tour through the neighborhood with a ranger from Boston African American National Historic Site. After a lunch on your own at Faneuil Hall, we will regroup for a program at the Museum of African American History, which includes a tour of the recently restored African Meeting House.

                                This workshop is open to all K-12 teachers and library media specialists. The $55 registration fee covers lunch on April 22, materials, and admission to the Museum of African American History. Teachers can earn 10 Professional Development Points for their participation.

                                23 April 2014 this event is free Brown Bag

                                "Pious Females" and "Good Schools": Transnational Networks of Education in Nineteenth-Century Liberia

                                12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
                                Marie Stango, University of Michigan

                                This project examines the networks of men and women who helped support education efforts in the American settlements in Liberia, West Africa. These philanthropists, many of them based in Massachusetts, helped establish formal and informal schools in the former American colonies and planned for a college, which opened for classes as Liberia College (now the University of Liberia) in 1863. How did these American sponsors manage an institution over four thousand miles away?

                                23 April 2014 Please RSVP   free eventregistration required at no cost Public Program

                                Dr. Zabdiel Boylston Adams: Surgeon & Soldier for the Union

                                6:00 PM - 7:30 PM
                                Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm Mitchell L. Adams

                                For Zabdiel Boylston Adams, an 1853 graduate of Harvard Medical School, the Civil War was a watershed and a defining period. On the afternoon of July 2, 1863, the doctor set up a makeshift hospital close to the field of battle. Having noticed how many soldiers were dying during transport from combat to distant medical care, Adams pioneered on-site medical treatments. He labored so long in surgeries at Gettysburg that he was nearly blinded with exhaustion. At the Battle of the Wilderness Adams was severely wounded. Captured by Confederate forces, his shattered left leg useless and gangrenous, he treated himself by pouring pure nitric acid into his wounds, a treatment that must have been as excruciating as it was efficacious. A man at the nexus of two distinguished New England families—Boylston and Adams—at a particularly dramatic moment in history, Dr. Adams is more than an ancestor or historical figure; to his great-grandson, Mitchell L. Adams, he is a legend.

                                To Reserve: Click here to register online, or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

                                25 April 2014 this event is free Public Program

                                Gallery Talk

                                2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

                                Staff members from the Museum of African American History will be on hand to discuss items featured in the Society's current exhibition Tell It with Pride.

                                26 April 2014 this event is free MHS Tour

                                MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS

                                10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

                                Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

                                The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

                                Free and open to the public.

                                29 April 2014 Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
                                Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
                                Immigration and Urban History Seminar

                                Panel Discussion: American Catholics and U.S. Immigration Policy before the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965

                                5:15 PM - 7:30 PM
                                Danielle Battisti, University of Nebraska, Gráinne McEvoy, Boston College Comment: Justin Poché, College of the Holy Cross

                                McEvoy’s paper, “‘A Christian and Democratic Attitude’: The Catholic Campaign for Education and Enlightenment on U.S. Immigration Policy, 1952-1957,” examines the Catholic campaign for comprehensive immigration reform during and in the wake of the McCarran-Walter Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, which removed discrimination on the basis of race from federal immigration policy but retained the national origins quota system. Battisti’s essay, “‘Whom Shall We Welcome?’ Italian Americans and Immigration Reform Campaigns, 1948-1965,” examines the efforts of Italian Americans who both assisted Italian immigrants to the U.S. after World War II and who joined in a broader movement to abolish the national origins system and thereby reform the nation’s immigration policies in the 1950s and 1960s.

                                30 April 2014 Please RSVP   this event requires a feeregistration required Author Talk, Public Program

                                Jefferson & Hamilton: The Rivalry that Forged a Nation

                                6:00 PM - 7:30 PM
                                Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm John Ferling Annual Jefferson Lecture

                                Jefferson and Hamilton is the story of the fierce struggle—both public and, ultimately, bitterly personal—between two titans. Both men were visionaries, but their visions of what the United States should be were diametrically opposed. Jefferson believed passionately in individual liberty and a more egalitarian society, with a weak central government and greater powers for the states. Hamilton sought to build a powerful national government that could ensure the young nation’s security and drive it toward economic greatness.

                                John Ferling, a leading authority on late 18th and early 19th century American history, is the author of many books, including Almost a Miracle: The American Victory in the War for Independence, Adams vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800, Setting the World Ablaze: Washington, Adams, and Jefferson in the American Revolution, and the award-winning A Leap in the Dark: The Struggle to Create the American Republic.

                                To Reserve: There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Click here to register online, or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.


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