Calendar of Events

Exhibition

Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country

Massachusetts Women in WWI. 12 June 2014 to 24 January 2015

Details

January

Library Closed Library Closed 1 January 2014.Wednesday, all day The MHS library will be closed Tuesday, 24 December 2013, through Wednesday, 1 January 2014.  ...

The MHS library will be closed Tuesday, 24 December 2013, through Wednesday, 1 January 2014.  The library will return to regular business hours on Thursday, 2 January 2014.  The exhibition galleries, featuring The Cabinet Maker and the Carver: Boston Furniture from Private Collections, will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM, Thursday, 26 December, through Saturday, 28 December, and Monday, 30 December. 

details
Building Closed MHS Closing 2 January 2014.Thursday, 12:00PM - 4:45PM The MHS will be closing at noon on Thursday due to inclement weather. The building will be closed ...

The MHS will be closing at noon on Thursday due to inclement weather. The building will be closed Friday, 3 January, 2014.

details
Building Closed MHS Closed 3 January 2014.Friday, all day The MHS will be closed Friday due to inclement weather.

The MHS will be closed Friday due to inclement weather.

details
Notice Building Open Saturday 4 January 2014.Saturday, all day Building is expected to reopen Saturday, but check here for any further updates.

Building is expected to reopen Saturday, but check here for any further updates.

details
Brown Bag A Climatic Debate: Abolition and Climate in Eighteenth-Century Britain 8 January 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Katherine Johnston, Columbia University Toward the end of the eighteenth century, as British Parliamentary debates over abolition in the ...

Toward the end of the eighteenth century, as British Parliamentary debates over abolition in the West Indies grew increasingly serious, the Board of Trade interrogated people familiar with plantation life. What sorts of health risks did plantation work pose for enslaved laborers? Could Europeans labor in the West Indian climate? This project examines some of the testimony that absentee planters provided to Parliament and contrasts these arguments with evidence taken from these same planters' private letters. Public testimony did not always match up with personal opinions, and this project explores some of the differences between the two.

details
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 11 January 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

details
Environmental History Seminar Out of the Blue: Nantucket and the Pacific World 14 January 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Edward D. Melillo, Amherst College Comment: Nancy Shoemaker, University of Connecticut Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568. Authors ...

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

details
Brown Bag Americanizing America: Yankee Civilization and the U.S. State 15 January 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Dylan Yeats, New York University Please join Loring Fellow Dylan Yeats to discuss his dissertation and the research he is conducting ...

Please join Loring Fellow Dylan Yeats to discuss his dissertation and the research he is conducting at the Massachusetts Historical Society and Boston Athenaeum. Yeats is charting the evolution of what he terms the Yankee Network, comprising academic, educational, missionary, and social reform organizations, and the ways in which this network sought to harness those organs of the state that it could over the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

details
Special Event, Member Event An Evening Social 15 January 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM Please RSVP   This event is open only to MHS Associate Members MHS Associate Members (age 40 and under) are invited to an evening social with the Young Friends of ...

MHS Associate Members (age 40 and under) are invited to an evening social with the Young Friends of Historic New England. Guests will gather at the MHS for a reception followed by a scavenger hunt based on "The Cabinetmaker and the Carver" exhibition.

For more information please call 617-646-0543 or e-mail awolfe@masshist.org.

details
Biography Seminar When Subjects Talk Back: Oral History, Contemporary Biography, and the Runaway Interview 16 January 2014.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Joyce Antler, Brandeis University, Claire Potter, New School for Public Engagement, Ted Widmer, Brown University Moderator: Carol Bundy, author of The Nature of Sacrifice: A Biography of Charles Russell Lowell, Jr., 1835-64 This program will feature a conversation with Joyce Antler, Professor of American Studies at ...

This program will feature a conversation with Joyce Antler, Professor of American Studies at Brandeis, who is currently writing a book on Jewish women active in the feminist movement; Claire Potter, Professor of History at the New School, who is writing on anti-pornography efforts in the 1980s; and Ted Widmer, senior advisor to former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.

details
Desk and bookcase Exhibitionends The Cabinetmaker & the Carver: Boston Furniture from Private Collections 17 January 2014.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Monday through Saturday, 10 am to 4 pm This exhibition provides visitors with a rare opportunity to see nearly 50 examples of significant ...

Desk and bookcaseThis exhibition provides visitors with a rare opportunity to see nearly 50 examples of significant furniture borrowed from distinguished private collections in the greater Boston area. Ranging in date from the late-17th-century to about 1900, these privately held treasures, generously lent by their owners, provide a look at the trajectory of cabinetmaking in the Hub. They are supplemented with documents, portraits, and other material from the Society's collections that help place the furniture into historical context.

The exhibition is part of Four Centuries of Massachusetts Furniture a collaborative project of the Massachusetts Historical Society and ten other institutions that features exhibitions, lectures, demonstrations and publications to celebrate the Bay State's legacy of furniture-making. Visit fourcenturies.org.

Image: Desk and bookcase, carving attributed to John Welch, Boston, Mass., ca. 1750–1755, private collection. Photo by Laura Wulf.

details
Building Closed Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 20 January 2014.Monday, all day The MHS is closed for Martin Juther King Jr. Day.

The MHS is closed for Martin Juther King Jr. Day.

details
Public Program, Author Talk The Hub's Metropolis: Greater Boston's Development from Railroad Suburb to Smart Growth 22 January 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30pm James O'Connell, National Park Service The population of the Boston Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) is ranked tenth largest in the ...

The population of the Boston Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) is ranked tenth largest in the United States. The region’s sprawling scale, with 234 municipalities, can make it difficult to grasp its character. Urban historian James O’Connell will present an illustrated talk about how metropolitan Boston has been shaped by distinct eras of suburbanization, with each one producing a land use development pattern that is still apparent on the regional landscape. Drawing upon his recent book, The Hub’s Metropolis: Greater Boston’s Development from Railroad Suburbs to Smart Growth, O’Connell will explain how each period had specific characteristics related to modes of transportation, building types, commercial uses, and the treatment of open and public space. He will describe how Boston has been a national pace-setter for country estates, railroad suburbs, metropolitan parks, land use zoning, highway beltways, shopping centers, office parks, edge cities, and central city redevelopment. The presentation will conclude with a discussion of how the region’s development legacy is shaping current efforts to promote smart growth and sustainable development.

James O’Connell is a planner and historian for the Boston Regional Office of the National Park Service. He has a B.A. from Bates College and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Urban History from the University of Chicago. He has written five books, including Becoming Cape Cod: Creating a Seaside Resort, and has contributed chapters to A Landscape History of New England, Remaking Boston: An Environmental History of the City and Its Surroundings, and The Encyclopedia of New England.

To Register: Reservations Requested. Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

details
Immigration and Urban History Seminar Making a Workforce, Unmaking a Working Class: The Development of "Human Capital" in Houston, 1900-1980 28 January 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Bryant Etheridge, Harvard University Comment: John R. Harris, Boston University Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568. Authors ...

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

details
February
Early American History Seminar Panel Discussion: Law and the American Revolution 4 February 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Mary Sarah Bilder, Boston College Law School, T.H. Breen, University of Vermont and Huntington Library, Bruce Mann, Harvard Law School, Kent Newmyer, University of Connecticut Moderator: Alan Rogers, Boston College Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568. There ...

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

There are no original essays to read for this program, but if you have not done so you might wish to read chapter 2 of Grant Gilmore's The Ages of American Law (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1977) in preparation for this program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

details
Building Closed Snow Closure 5 February 2014.Wednesday, all day The MHS is closed on Wednesday, February 5th, due to inclement weather. We anticipate reopening as ...

The MHS is closed on Wednesday, February 5th, due to inclement weather. We anticipate reopening as normal on Thursday, February 6th. Please check the website and/or call 617-646-0500 for further updates.

details
Public Program Boston’s Mayor James Michael Curley: The Quintessential Politician & Public Works Patron 6 February 2014.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Lawrence Overlan James Michael Curley was perhaps the most prolific politician in Massachusetts history. In honor ...

James Michael Curley was perhaps the most prolific politician in Massachusetts history. In honor of the 100th anniversary of his first election as Mayor of Boston, this talk will highlight the building of public works in Boston during his time in office. Parks, police and fire stations, public schools, transit expansion, hospitals, beaches and public art erected during his tenure abound in Boston and provide comfort, beauty and long term significant economic benefits for visitors and Bostonians alike.

Lawrence Overlan has been researching, teaching, speaking and writing about James Michael Curley for over a decade.

details
Environmental History Seminar "A tacit proclamation of achievement by the Race": Landscapes Built With African American Civilian Conservation Corps Labor in the Rural Midwest 11 February 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Brian McCammack, Williams College Comment: Neil Maher, NJIT—Rutgers University Newark Federated History Department Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568. Authors ...

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

details
Public Program Created Equal: The Loving Story 12 February 2014.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Film Screening & Discussion Facilitated by Joanne Pope Melish, University of Kentucky Mildred and Richard Loving knew it was technically illegal for them to live as a married couple in ...

Mildred and Richard Loving knew it was technically illegal for them to live as a married couple in Virginia because she was of African American and Native American descent and he was white. The Loving Story, nominated for an Emmy in 2013, brings to life the Lovings’ marriage and the legal battle that followed. The film will be shown in its entirety.

Joanne Pope Melish is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Kentucky and a visiting scholar in American Studies at Brown University. She is the author of Disowning Slavery: Gradual Emancipation and “Race” in New England, 1780-1860.

To Reserve: Click here to register online or call  the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

details
Building Closed President's Day 17 February 2014.Monday, all day The MHS is closed for President's Day.

The MHS is closed for President's Day.

details
Brown Bag Consumed by Poverty: The Experience of Tuberculosis in the Boston Almshouse, 1800-1850 19 February 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Mary Fuhrer, Independent Scholar Tuberculosis caused up to a third of all deaths in antebellum New England. Attempting to make sense ...

Tuberculosis caused up to a third of all deaths in antebellum New England. Attempting to make sense of this devastation, sufferers—and society—created "illness narratives" to interpret their experience and provide meaning, consolation, or blame. This study examines poor consumptives in the Boston Almshouse, seeking to "open out" their lives and better understand how they—and others—made sense of their affliction.

details
Library Closed Library Closing @ 3:00pm 20 February 2014.Thursday, all day The MHS library will be closing at 3pm on Thursday, February 20th, to prepare for the evening ...

The MHS library will be closing at 3pm on Thursday, February 20th, to prepare for the evening preview reception of Tell It With Pride.

details
Member Event, Special Event, Public Program Tell It with Pride Preview Reception 20 February 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM Please RSVP   This event is open only to MHS Fellows and Members. MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special preview and reception for Tell ...

Shaw MemorialMHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special preview and reception for Tell It With Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ Shaw Memorial. Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, the exhibition brings together photographs of members of the regiment and of the men and women who recruited, nursed, taught, and guided them.

Please note: the 5:30 PM pre-reception talk is sold out.

Become a Member today!

details
Exhibitionbegins Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial 21 February 2014.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington In commemoration of the Civil War battle of Fort Wagner led by Colonel Robert Gould Shaw and the men ...


In commemoration of the Civil War battle of Fort Wagner led by Colonel Robert Gould Shaw and the men of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment and in cooperation with the Massachusetts Historical Society, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. has organized the exhibition Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ Shaw Memorial.

The exhibition celebrates Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ magisterial Shaw Memorial (1883–1900). When Saint-Gaudens created the monument, he based his likeness of Shaw on photographs of the colonel, but for his depiction of the other soldiers, he hired African American men to pose in his studio. This exhibition seeks to make real the soldiers of the 54th represented anonymously in the memorial. It brings together vintage photographic portraits of members of the regiment and of the men and women who recruited, nursed, taught, and guided them.

Throughout the run of the exhibition special programs are planned in cooperation with the Museum of African American History, the Boston African American National Historic Site, the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment Company A, and the Friends of the Public Garden.

details
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 22 February 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

details
Public Program, Author Talk Crossed Swords: Job Shattuck's Blood at the Courthouse Door 23 February 2014.Sunday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Please RSVP   Location: Lawrence Library in Pepperell, Mass. Gary Shattuck The Revolution forced many changes on Massachusetts society including the relationships and ...

The Revolution forced many changes on Massachusetts society including the relationships and expectations of those living in the countryside. Courthouse takeovers began in the summer of 1786 when officials failed to address petitions for relief from taxes and judgments rendered against farmers by debt-enforcing courts. Capt. Job Shattuck was one of the early leaders who sided with the protestors, and he paid dearly for the effort. Shocking new evidence found in court records allows us to reassess his role and reputation.

Gary Shattuck is a retired federal prosecutor who enjoys researching and writing about newfound discoveries lying deep within little-used legal documents.

This talk is presented in collaboration with Freedom’s Way National Heritage Area and will take place at the Lawrence Library in Pepperell, Mass.

To Reserve: Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560. 

details
Brown Bag "A Wigwam with Two Fires": Place and Historical Narrative in Indian-Settler Relations in the Kennebec River Valley 24 February 2014.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Ashley Smith, Cornell University This research project asks, in what ways can place-based ethnography contribute to our understanding ...

This research project asks, in what ways can place-based ethnography contribute to our understanding of complex historical and social relations in settler-colonial society? It begins with Norridgewock village in the Kennebec River Valley of Maine as a focal point, understanding this village to be simultaneously a physical place, a collection of stories, and a set of relationships. It then follows the networks of social relationships, memory narratives, and historical knowledges outward in order to reveal the roles that place, history, and memory play in the negotiation of relationships in settler-colonial spaces.

details
Immigration and Urban History Seminar Curating the City: The Framing of Los Angeles 25 February 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Catherine Gudis, University of California—Riverside Comment: Carlo Rotella, Boston College Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568. Authors ...

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

details
Public Program Handel and Haydn Society: Bringing Music to Life for 200 Years 26 February 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Pre-Performance reception at 5:30pm Handel and Haydn Society Period Instrument Orchestra and Chorus Members of the Period Instrument Orchestra and Chorus, along with Christopher Hogwood Historically ...

Members of the Period Instrument Orchestra and Chorus, along with Christopher Hogwood Historically Informed Performance Fellow Teresa M. Neff, share the 200-year history of the Handel and Haydn Society through music and stories, The program includes an eclectic range of works from the 18th century: hymns by William Billings, chamber music by Mozart and Beethoven, and excerpts from Haydn's The Creation and Handel's Messiah.

Since 1815, the Handel and Haydn Society has shared the inspirational and transformational power of Baroque and Classical music with people throughout Boston and the country. Join H +H for an instrumental and vocal chamber performance that will share the history of the institution, considered America’s oldest continuously performing arts organization.

To Reserve: There is a $30 fee ($20 fee for Fellows and Members). Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

details
Public Program, Author Talk George Washington: Gentleman Warrior 27 February 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM Location: Boston Public Library, Copley Square Steven Brumwell Stephen Brumwell’s new book focuses on George Washington, the feisty young frontier officer ...

Stephen Brumwell’s new book focuses on George Washington, the feisty young frontier officer and the tough forty-something commander of the revolutionaries’ Continental Army. It examines his long and chequered military career, tracing his evolution as a soldier, and his changing attitude to the waging of war.

Dr. Stephen Brumwell is an award-winning independent historian and journalist. He attended the University of Leeds, gaining a PhD in history and British Academy funding to research eighteenth-century North America. Brumwell's widely acclaimed books include Redcoats: The British Soldier and War in the Americas, 1755–1763; White Devil: A True Story of War, Savagery and Vengeance in Colonial America; and Paths of Glory: The Life and Death of General James Wolfe.

This event is co-sponsored by the MHS and the Boston Public Library.

To Reserve: This event is free and open to the public.

details
March
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 1 March 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

details
Early American History Seminar Negro Cloth: Mastering the Market for Slave Clothing in Antebellum America 4 March 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Seth Rockman, Brown University Comment: David Quigley, Boston College Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568. Authors ...

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

details
Brown Bag The Appomattox Effect: Searching for the End of War in the American Civil War and Beyond 5 March 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Michael Vorenberg, Brown University Americans tend to mark the surrender at Appomattox as the end of the Civil War, but the last battle ...

Americans tend to mark the surrender at Appomattox as the end of the Civil War, but the last battle came more than a month later, the last surrender a month after that, and the official “cessation of hostilities” more than a year later. A similar Appomattox effect shapes the way Americans think of other wars, making people assume, even when well-known facts indicate otherwise, that wars have discrete, identifiable endpoints. This lunch discussion raises some of the issues associated with identifying the end of any U.S. war in light of the search for an end of the Civil War.

details
Public Program, Special Event A Traveled First Lady: An Evening with Louisa Catherine Adams 6 March 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm C. James Taylor and Margaret Hogan In A Traveled First Lady: Writings of Louisa Catherine Adams, editors Margaret Hogan and C. ...

In A Traveled First Lady: Writings of Louisa Catherine Adams, editors Margaret Hogan and C. James Taylor selected excerpts from diaries and memoirs of Adams’s most revealing comments on life at European courts, the difficulty of being an outsider, Abigail Adams’s Quincy, and the importance of society and etiquette in early Washington D.C. She is best remembered as one the capital’s most accomplished hostesses as hundreds of guests regularly attended her Tuesday evenings of conversation, music, dancing, and refreshments. Join the editors for a social evening with Louisa. There will be conversation and refreshments—but no dancing!

Margaret A. Hogan is an independent editorial consultant and the former Managing Editor of the Adams Papers at the Massachusetts Historical Society. C. James Taylor is Editor in Chief of the Adams Papers.

To Reserve: There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

details
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 8 March 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

details
Environmental History Seminar The Galveston Spirit: How a Hurricane Remade American Politics 11 March 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Summer A. Shafer, Harvard University Comment: Anthony N. Penna, Northeastern University Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568. Authors ...

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

details
Public Program Created Equal: The Abolitionists 12 March 2014.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Film Screening & Discussion Facilitated by Joanne Pope Melish, University of Kentucky The Abolitionists brings to life the struggles of the men and women who led the battle to ...

The Abolitionists brings to life the struggles of the men and women who led the battle to end slavery.Using this film to ground our discussion, we will explore the lives of the individuals who participated in the antislavery movement: newspaper editor William Lloyd Garrison; former slave, author, and activist Frederick Douglass; Angelina Grimké, daughter of a rich South Carolina slaveholder; Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom's Cabin; and John Brown, ultimately executed for his armed seizure of the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry. Clips from the film will be shown at the event, and the film can be viewed in its entirety at: createdequal.neh.gov.

Joanne Pope Melish is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Kentucky and a visiting scholar in American Studies at Brown University. She is the author of Disowning Slavery: Gradual Emancipation and “Race” in New England, 1780-1860.

To Reserve: Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

details
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 15 March 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

details
Public Program, Author Talk The Lodge Women, Their Men and Their Times 17 March 2014.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Emily Lodge Like a Whitman poem, the saga of the Lodge family has unfolded in tandem with the history of the ...

Like a Whitman poem, the saga of the Lodge family has unfolded in tandem with the history of the great American experiment itself. Yet while the biographies of the Lodge patriarchs have been well-documented, the stories of the influential Lodge women have never been authoritatively chronicled. From the earliest days of the American colonies, through the Gilded Age, and into the first years of the 21st century, The Lodge Women Their Men, and Their Times traces her family’s remarkable history through its female figures, constructing a narrative that is at once intensely personal, political, and wholly universal.

Based on archival research, interviews, and personal memoirs, Emily Lodge presents her ancestors' stories largely through their own voices, heard in a rich collection of personal letters exchanged with the luminaries of their times, whose lives were linked with the Lodges by politics, art, and family: Henry Adams, Henry James, Theodore Roosevelt, John Hay, Elizabeth Cameron and Edith Wharton, some of whose letters are published here for the first time.From her unique descendant’s view on a long line of prominent Lodge women, the author recalls their grace, dash, and political influence through a sweep of history that illuminates the pages with the incandescent human truths of a distinguished family's life and times.

Over the last thirty years a fascination with public policy has taken Emily into government, journalism, business and academia. As a print journalist, she focused on law and the courts. As a speech-writer for a US Congressman and a US Ambassador to France, her domain was foreign policy. As an award-winning television documentary researcher for 60 Minutes, she helped prove someone innocent. Emily won an Emmy Award for a CBS News Special Report about education. On moving to Europe, she became a correspondent for Brussel’s leading monthly business magazine. Her ParisVoice features column were known for their witty and perceptive observations about public figures. She has written brochures for companies and helped create a major fund-raising drive for INSEAD, Europe’s premier business school. A graduate of Georgetown University in diplomatic history, she is currently writing news analysis from the Middle East.

To Reserve: This event is free and open to the public.

details
Brown Bag "Dam all pumpkin states": King Williams War in the North and Colonial Legitimacy 19 March 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Katie Moore, Boston University In the spring of 1689, the Dominion of New England collapsed when provisional authorities in Boston ...

In the spring of 1689, the Dominion of New England collapsed when provisional authorities in Boston and New York seized power. The governor-general was placed under house arrest and the northern garrisons ordered abandoned, exposing the English frontier to ongoing attacks by French and Abenaki soldiers. The following year, ad hoc colonial governments coordinated and launched attacks on Quebec and Montreal. How did Puritan divines and a German militia captain use war with the French to legitimate their authority to colonists, colonial leaders, and Native American allies? How did they justify strategy, finance, and diplomacy? Join us to learn more about this fascinating project. - This event has been rescheduled from February 5, when it was postponed due to snow..

details
Special Event An Evening at the Bostonian Society 19 March 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM This event is open only to members of the Jeremy Belknap Circle. Members of the Jeremy Belknap Circle are invited to an evening at the Bostonian Society located at ...

State Street, 1801Members of the Jeremy Belknap Circle are invited to an evening at the Bostonian Society located at 206 Washington Street in Boston. Brian LeMay and Nat Sheidley will discuss ongoing plans and lead a tour of the building, including the tower (and its resident ghost). A reception will follow.

To register, please call 617-646-0543 or e-mail awolfe@masshist.org.

Join an MHS Fund Giving Circle today!

details
Biography Seminar The Days of Their Lives: Using Diaries, Journals, and an "Almanack" to Recover the Past 20 March 2014.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, Harvard University; Louisa Thomas, independent scholar and the author of Conscience; Noelle Baker, The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau Moderator: Susan Ware, General Editor, American National Biography This program will feature a conversation with Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, 300th Anniversary University ...

This program will feature a conversation with Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, 300th Anniversary University Professor at Harvard, who is using diaries (men's and women's) in her broader study of Mormon history; Louisa Thomas, an independent scholar and the author of "Conscience" (about her grandfather Norman Thomas), who is writing a biography of Louisa Catherine Adams; and Noelle Baker, Editorial Consultant to The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau, who is preparing a digital edition of Mary Moody Emerson's diary.

details
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 22 March 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

details
Immigration and Urban History Seminar Boston’s Chinatowns and Recent Senior Migration 25 March 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Nicole Newendorp, Harvard University Comment: Wing-kai To, Bridgewater State University Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568. Authors ...

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

details
Library Closed Library Closed 27 March 2014.Thursday, all day Due to maintenance work in the building the MHS library will be closed to researchers on Thursday, ...

Due to maintenance work in the building the MHS library will be closed to researchers on Thursday, 27 March 2014.  Contact the library staff at 617-646-0532 or library@masshist.org with any questions. 

details
Member Event, Special Event New Faces & New Acquisitions 27 March 2014.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   This event is open only to new MHS Fellows and Members. Following a reception, new Fellows and Members are invited to join us for a unique opportunity to ...

Following a reception, new Fellows and Members are invited to join us for a unique opportunity to learn more about and view a selection of the Society's most recent acquisitions, including letters from a stunning collection of Adams and Cranch family correspondence and items from the Civil War archives of Capt. Luis F. Emilio of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment. Enjoy the chance to view Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial. Please call 617-646-0560 or register online by clicking the ticket icon above.

Become a Member today!

details
Special Event, Public Program Tell it with Pride 29 March 2014.Saturday, 12:00PM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   54th Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment Company A Kathryn Greenthal and Henry Duffy Visitors are invited to enjoy an afternoon program of exhibition tours and special talks at the MHS ...

Visitors are invited to enjoy an afternoon program of exhibition tours and special talks at the MHS related to the Tell It With Pride exhibition.

12:00: Join us for a presentation from the men of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment Company A, a company of civilian re-enactment personnel who keep alive the legacy of the unit through living history displays, educational briefings to the general public, and Civil War period encampments and re-enactments.

1:00 Time to view the exhibition and for informal conversation with the men of the 54th Regiment.

2:00: Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial: Its Context and Its Creation, a lecture by Kathryn Greenthal, author of Augustus Saint-Gaudens: Master Sculptor.

3:00 Consecration and Monument: Robert Gould Shaw and the Massachusetts 54th Regiment, a lecture by Henry Duffy, Curator of Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site in Cornish, NH.

This program is presented in partnership with the Friends of the Public Garden.

To Reserve: Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560. Please register if you plan to attend ANY part of this program (even if you can not join us for the entire afternoon).

details
More events
Library Closed Library Closed 1 January 2014.Wednesday, all day

The MHS library will be closed Tuesday, 24 December 2013, through Wednesday, 1 January 2014.  The library will return to regular business hours on Thursday, 2 January 2014.  The exhibition galleries, featuring The Cabinet Maker and the Carver: Boston Furniture from Private Collections, will be open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM, Thursday, 26 December, through Saturday, 28 December, and Monday, 30 December. 

close
Building Closed MHS Closing 2 January 2014.Thursday, 12:00PM - 4:45PM

The MHS will be closing at noon on Thursday due to inclement weather. The building will be closed Friday, 3 January, 2014.

close
Building Closed MHS Closed 3 January 2014.Friday, all day

The MHS will be closed Friday due to inclement weather.

close
Notice Building Open Saturday 4 January 2014.Saturday, all day

Building is expected to reopen Saturday, but check here for any further updates.

close
Brown Bag A Climatic Debate: Abolition and Climate in Eighteenth-Century Britain 8 January 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Katherine Johnston, Columbia University

Toward the end of the eighteenth century, as British Parliamentary debates over abolition in the West Indies grew increasingly serious, the Board of Trade interrogated people familiar with plantation life. What sorts of health risks did plantation work pose for enslaved laborers? Could Europeans labor in the West Indian climate? This project examines some of the testimony that absentee planters provided to Parliament and contrasts these arguments with evidence taken from these same planters' private letters. Public testimony did not always match up with personal opinions, and this project explores some of the differences between the two.

close
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 11 January 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

close
Environmental History Seminar Out of the Blue: Nantucket and the Pacific World 14 January 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Edward D. Melillo, Amherst College Comment: Nancy Shoemaker, University of Connecticut

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

close
Brown Bag Americanizing America: Yankee Civilization and the U.S. State 15 January 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Dylan Yeats, New York University

Please join Loring Fellow Dylan Yeats to discuss his dissertation and the research he is conducting at the Massachusetts Historical Society and Boston Athenaeum. Yeats is charting the evolution of what he terms the Yankee Network, comprising academic, educational, missionary, and social reform organizations, and the ways in which this network sought to harness those organs of the state that it could over the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

close
Special Event, Member Event An Evening Social 15 January 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost This event is open only to MHS Associate Members

MHS Associate Members (age 40 and under) are invited to an evening social with the Young Friends of Historic New England. Guests will gather at the MHS for a reception followed by a scavenger hunt based on "The Cabinetmaker and the Carver" exhibition.

For more information please call 617-646-0543 or e-mail awolfe@masshist.org.

close
Biography Seminar When Subjects Talk Back: Oral History, Contemporary Biography, and the Runaway Interview 16 January 2014.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Joyce Antler, Brandeis University, Claire Potter, New School for Public Engagement, Ted Widmer, Brown University Moderator: Carol Bundy, author of The Nature of Sacrifice: A Biography of Charles Russell Lowell, Jr., 1835-64

This program will feature a conversation with Joyce Antler, Professor of American Studies at Brandeis, who is currently writing a book on Jewish women active in the feminist movement; Claire Potter, Professor of History at the New School, who is writing on anti-pornography efforts in the 1980s; and Ted Widmer, senior advisor to former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.

close
Exhibition The Cabinetmaker & the Carver: Boston Furniture from Private Collections 17 January 2014.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Monday through Saturday, 10 am to 4 pm Desk and bookcase

Desk and bookcaseThis exhibition provides visitors with a rare opportunity to see nearly 50 examples of significant furniture borrowed from distinguished private collections in the greater Boston area. Ranging in date from the late-17th-century to about 1900, these privately held treasures, generously lent by their owners, provide a look at the trajectory of cabinetmaking in the Hub. They are supplemented with documents, portraits, and other material from the Society's collections that help place the furniture into historical context.

The exhibition is part of Four Centuries of Massachusetts Furniture a collaborative project of the Massachusetts Historical Society and ten other institutions that features exhibitions, lectures, demonstrations and publications to celebrate the Bay State's legacy of furniture-making. Visit fourcenturies.org.

Image: Desk and bookcase, carving attributed to John Welch, Boston, Mass., ca. 1750–1755, private collection. Photo by Laura Wulf.

close
Building Closed Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 20 January 2014.Monday, all day

The MHS is closed for Martin Juther King Jr. Day.

close
Public Program, Author Talk The Hub's Metropolis: Greater Boston's Development from Railroad Suburb to Smart Growth 22 January 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30pm James O'Connell, National Park Service

The population of the Boston Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) is ranked tenth largest in the United States. The region’s sprawling scale, with 234 municipalities, can make it difficult to grasp its character. Urban historian James O’Connell will present an illustrated talk about how metropolitan Boston has been shaped by distinct eras of suburbanization, with each one producing a land use development pattern that is still apparent on the regional landscape. Drawing upon his recent book, The Hub’s Metropolis: Greater Boston’s Development from Railroad Suburbs to Smart Growth, O’Connell will explain how each period had specific characteristics related to modes of transportation, building types, commercial uses, and the treatment of open and public space. He will describe how Boston has been a national pace-setter for country estates, railroad suburbs, metropolitan parks, land use zoning, highway beltways, shopping centers, office parks, edge cities, and central city redevelopment. The presentation will conclude with a discussion of how the region’s development legacy is shaping current efforts to promote smart growth and sustainable development.

James O’Connell is a planner and historian for the Boston Regional Office of the National Park Service. He has a B.A. from Bates College and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Urban History from the University of Chicago. He has written five books, including Becoming Cape Cod: Creating a Seaside Resort, and has contributed chapters to A Landscape History of New England, Remaking Boston: An Environmental History of the City and Its Surroundings, and The Encyclopedia of New England.

To Register: Reservations Requested. Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

close
Immigration and Urban History Seminar Making a Workforce, Unmaking a Working Class: The Development of "Human Capital" in Houston, 1900-1980 28 January 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Bryant Etheridge, Harvard University Comment: John R. Harris, Boston University

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

close
Early American History Seminar Panel Discussion: Law and the American Revolution 4 February 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Mary Sarah Bilder, Boston College Law School, T.H. Breen, University of Vermont and Huntington Library, Bruce Mann, Harvard Law School, Kent Newmyer, University of Connecticut Moderator: Alan Rogers, Boston College

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

There are no original essays to read for this program, but if you have not done so you might wish to read chapter 2 of Grant Gilmore's The Ages of American Law (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1977) in preparation for this program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

close
Building Closed Snow Closure 5 February 2014.Wednesday, all day

The MHS is closed on Wednesday, February 5th, due to inclement weather. We anticipate reopening as normal on Thursday, February 6th. Please check the website and/or call 617-646-0500 for further updates.

close
Public Program Boston’s Mayor James Michael Curley: The Quintessential Politician & Public Works Patron 6 February 2014.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Lawrence Overlan

James Michael Curley was perhaps the most prolific politician in Massachusetts history. In honor of the 100th anniversary of his first election as Mayor of Boston, this talk will highlight the building of public works in Boston during his time in office. Parks, police and fire stations, public schools, transit expansion, hospitals, beaches and public art erected during his tenure abound in Boston and provide comfort, beauty and long term significant economic benefits for visitors and Bostonians alike.

Lawrence Overlan has been researching, teaching, speaking and writing about James Michael Curley for over a decade.

close
Environmental History Seminar "A tacit proclamation of achievement by the Race": Landscapes Built With African American Civilian Conservation Corps Labor in the Rural Midwest 11 February 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Brian McCammack, Williams College Comment: Neil Maher, NJIT—Rutgers University Newark Federated History Department

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

close
Public Program Created Equal: The Loving Story 12 February 2014.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost Film Screening & Discussion Facilitated by Joanne Pope Melish, University of Kentucky

Mildred and Richard Loving knew it was technically illegal for them to live as a married couple in Virginia because she was of African American and Native American descent and he was white. The Loving Story, nominated for an Emmy in 2013, brings to life the Lovings’ marriage and the legal battle that followed. The film will be shown in its entirety.

Joanne Pope Melish is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Kentucky and a visiting scholar in American Studies at Brown University. She is the author of Disowning Slavery: Gradual Emancipation and “Race” in New England, 1780-1860.

To Reserve: Click here to register online or call  the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

close
Building Closed President's Day 17 February 2014.Monday, all day

The MHS is closed for President's Day.

close
Brown Bag Consumed by Poverty: The Experience of Tuberculosis in the Boston Almshouse, 1800-1850 19 February 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Mary Fuhrer, Independent Scholar

Tuberculosis caused up to a third of all deaths in antebellum New England. Attempting to make sense of this devastation, sufferers—and society—created "illness narratives" to interpret their experience and provide meaning, consolation, or blame. This study examines poor consumptives in the Boston Almshouse, seeking to "open out" their lives and better understand how they—and others—made sense of their affliction.

close
Library Closed Library Closing @ 3:00pm 20 February 2014.Thursday, all day

The MHS library will be closing at 3pm on Thursday, February 20th, to prepare for the evening preview reception of Tell It With Pride.

close
Member Event, Special Event, Public Program Tell It with Pride Preview Reception 20 February 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost This event is open only to MHS Fellows and Members.

Shaw MemorialMHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special preview and reception for Tell It With Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ Shaw Memorial. Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, the exhibition brings together photographs of members of the regiment and of the men and women who recruited, nursed, taught, and guided them.

Please note: the 5:30 PM pre-reception talk is sold out.

Become a Member today!

close
Exhibition Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial 21 February 2014 to 23 May 2014 this event is free Open Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington


In commemoration of the Civil War battle of Fort Wagner led by Colonel Robert Gould Shaw and the men of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment and in cooperation with the Massachusetts Historical Society, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. has organized the exhibition Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ Shaw Memorial.

The exhibition celebrates Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ magisterial Shaw Memorial (1883–1900). When Saint-Gaudens created the monument, he based his likeness of Shaw on photographs of the colonel, but for his depiction of the other soldiers, he hired African American men to pose in his studio. This exhibition seeks to make real the soldiers of the 54th represented anonymously in the memorial. It brings together vintage photographic portraits of members of the regiment and of the men and women who recruited, nursed, taught, and guided them.

Throughout the run of the exhibition special programs are planned in cooperation with the Museum of African American History, the Boston African American National Historic Site, the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment Company A, and the Friends of the Public Garden.

close
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 22 February 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

close
Public Program, Author Talk Crossed Swords: Job Shattuck's Blood at the Courthouse Door 23 February 2014.Sunday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost Location: Lawrence Library in Pepperell, Mass. Gary Shattuck

The Revolution forced many changes on Massachusetts society including the relationships and expectations of those living in the countryside. Courthouse takeovers began in the summer of 1786 when officials failed to address petitions for relief from taxes and judgments rendered against farmers by debt-enforcing courts. Capt. Job Shattuck was one of the early leaders who sided with the protestors, and he paid dearly for the effort. Shocking new evidence found in court records allows us to reassess his role and reputation.

Gary Shattuck is a retired federal prosecutor who enjoys researching and writing about newfound discoveries lying deep within little-used legal documents.

This talk is presented in collaboration with Freedom’s Way National Heritage Area and will take place at the Lawrence Library in Pepperell, Mass.

To Reserve: Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560. 

close
Brown Bag "A Wigwam with Two Fires": Place and Historical Narrative in Indian-Settler Relations in the Kennebec River Valley 24 February 2014.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Ashley Smith, Cornell University

This research project asks, in what ways can place-based ethnography contribute to our understanding of complex historical and social relations in settler-colonial society? It begins with Norridgewock village in the Kennebec River Valley of Maine as a focal point, understanding this village to be simultaneously a physical place, a collection of stories, and a set of relationships. It then follows the networks of social relationships, memory narratives, and historical knowledges outward in order to reveal the roles that place, history, and memory play in the negotiation of relationships in settler-colonial spaces.

close
Immigration and Urban History Seminar Curating the City: The Framing of Los Angeles 25 February 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Catherine Gudis, University of California—Riverside Comment: Carlo Rotella, Boston College

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

close
Public Program Handel and Haydn Society: Bringing Music to Life for 200 Years 26 February 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM registration required Pre-Performance reception at 5:30pm Handel and Haydn Society Period Instrument Orchestra and Chorus

Members of the Period Instrument Orchestra and Chorus, along with Christopher Hogwood Historically Informed Performance Fellow Teresa M. Neff, share the 200-year history of the Handel and Haydn Society through music and stories, The program includes an eclectic range of works from the 18th century: hymns by William Billings, chamber music by Mozart and Beethoven, and excerpts from Haydn's The Creation and Handel's Messiah.

Since 1815, the Handel and Haydn Society has shared the inspirational and transformational power of Baroque and Classical music with people throughout Boston and the country. Join H +H for an instrumental and vocal chamber performance that will share the history of the institution, considered America’s oldest continuously performing arts organization.

To Reserve: There is a $30 fee ($20 fee for Fellows and Members). Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

close
Public Program, Author Talk George Washington: Gentleman Warrior 27 February 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:00PM this event is free Location: Boston Public Library, Copley Square Steven Brumwell

Stephen Brumwell’s new book focuses on George Washington, the feisty young frontier officer and the tough forty-something commander of the revolutionaries’ Continental Army. It examines his long and chequered military career, tracing his evolution as a soldier, and his changing attitude to the waging of war.

Dr. Stephen Brumwell is an award-winning independent historian and journalist. He attended the University of Leeds, gaining a PhD in history and British Academy funding to research eighteenth-century North America. Brumwell's widely acclaimed books include Redcoats: The British Soldier and War in the Americas, 1755–1763; White Devil: A True Story of War, Savagery and Vengeance in Colonial America; and Paths of Glory: The Life and Death of General James Wolfe.

This event is co-sponsored by the MHS and the Boston Public Library.

To Reserve: This event is free and open to the public.

close
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 1 March 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

close
Early American History Seminar Negro Cloth: Mastering the Market for Slave Clothing in Antebellum America 4 March 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Seth Rockman, Brown University Comment: David Quigley, Boston College

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

close
Brown Bag The Appomattox Effect: Searching for the End of War in the American Civil War and Beyond 5 March 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Michael Vorenberg, Brown University

Americans tend to mark the surrender at Appomattox as the end of the Civil War, but the last battle came more than a month later, the last surrender a month after that, and the official “cessation of hostilities” more than a year later. A similar Appomattox effect shapes the way Americans think of other wars, making people assume, even when well-known facts indicate otherwise, that wars have discrete, identifiable endpoints. This lunch discussion raises some of the issues associated with identifying the end of any U.S. war in light of the search for an end of the Civil War.

close
Public Program, Special Event A Traveled First Lady: An Evening with Louisa Catherine Adams 6 March 2014.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-Talk reception at 5:30pm C. James Taylor and Margaret Hogan

In A Traveled First Lady: Writings of Louisa Catherine Adams, editors Margaret Hogan and C. James Taylor selected excerpts from diaries and memoirs of Adams’s most revealing comments on life at European courts, the difficulty of being an outsider, Abigail Adams’s Quincy, and the importance of society and etiquette in early Washington D.C. She is best remembered as one the capital’s most accomplished hostesses as hundreds of guests regularly attended her Tuesday evenings of conversation, music, dancing, and refreshments. Join the editors for a social evening with Louisa. There will be conversation and refreshments—but no dancing!

Margaret A. Hogan is an independent editorial consultant and the former Managing Editor of the Adams Papers at the Massachusetts Historical Society. C. James Taylor is Editor in Chief of the Adams Papers.

To Reserve: There is a $10 fee (no charge for Fellows and Members). Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

close
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 8 March 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

close
Environmental History Seminar The Galveston Spirit: How a Hurricane Remade American Politics 11 March 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Summer A. Shafer, Harvard University Comment: Anthony N. Penna, Northeastern University

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

close
Public Program Created Equal: The Abolitionists 12 March 2014.Wednesday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost Film Screening & Discussion Facilitated by Joanne Pope Melish, University of Kentucky

The Abolitionists brings to life the struggles of the men and women who led the battle to end slavery.Using this film to ground our discussion, we will explore the lives of the individuals who participated in the antislavery movement: newspaper editor William Lloyd Garrison; former slave, author, and activist Frederick Douglass; Angelina Grimké, daughter of a rich South Carolina slaveholder; Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom's Cabin; and John Brown, ultimately executed for his armed seizure of the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry. Clips from the film will be shown at the event, and the film can be viewed in its entirety at: createdequal.neh.gov.

Joanne Pope Melish is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Kentucky and a visiting scholar in American Studies at Brown University. She is the author of Disowning Slavery: Gradual Emancipation and “Race” in New England, 1780-1860.

To Reserve: Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560.

Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

close
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 15 March 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

close
Public Program, Author Talk The Lodge Women, Their Men and Their Times 17 March 2014.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Emily Lodge

Like a Whitman poem, the saga of the Lodge family has unfolded in tandem with the history of the great American experiment itself. Yet while the biographies of the Lodge patriarchs have been well-documented, the stories of the influential Lodge women have never been authoritatively chronicled. From the earliest days of the American colonies, through the Gilded Age, and into the first years of the 21st century, The Lodge Women Their Men, and Their Times traces her family’s remarkable history through its female figures, constructing a narrative that is at once intensely personal, political, and wholly universal.

Based on archival research, interviews, and personal memoirs, Emily Lodge presents her ancestors' stories largely through their own voices, heard in a rich collection of personal letters exchanged with the luminaries of their times, whose lives were linked with the Lodges by politics, art, and family: Henry Adams, Henry James, Theodore Roosevelt, John Hay, Elizabeth Cameron and Edith Wharton, some of whose letters are published here for the first time.From her unique descendant’s view on a long line of prominent Lodge women, the author recalls their grace, dash, and political influence through a sweep of history that illuminates the pages with the incandescent human truths of a distinguished family's life and times.

Over the last thirty years a fascination with public policy has taken Emily into government, journalism, business and academia. As a print journalist, she focused on law and the courts. As a speech-writer for a US Congressman and a US Ambassador to France, her domain was foreign policy. As an award-winning television documentary researcher for 60 Minutes, she helped prove someone innocent. Emily won an Emmy Award for a CBS News Special Report about education. On moving to Europe, she became a correspondent for Brussel’s leading monthly business magazine. Her ParisVoice features column were known for their witty and perceptive observations about public figures. She has written brochures for companies and helped create a major fund-raising drive for INSEAD, Europe’s premier business school. A graduate of Georgetown University in diplomatic history, she is currently writing news analysis from the Middle East.

To Reserve: This event is free and open to the public.

close
Brown Bag "Dam all pumpkin states": King Williams War in the North and Colonial Legitimacy 19 March 2014.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Katie Moore, Boston University

In the spring of 1689, the Dominion of New England collapsed when provisional authorities in Boston and New York seized power. The governor-general was placed under house arrest and the northern garrisons ordered abandoned, exposing the English frontier to ongoing attacks by French and Abenaki soldiers. The following year, ad hoc colonial governments coordinated and launched attacks on Quebec and Montreal. How did Puritan divines and a German militia captain use war with the French to legitimate their authority to colonists, colonial leaders, and Native American allies? How did they justify strategy, finance, and diplomacy? Join us to learn more about this fascinating project. - This event has been rescheduled from February 5, when it was postponed due to snow..

close
Special Event An Evening at the Bostonian Society 19 March 2014.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM registration required at no cost This event is open only to members of the Jeremy Belknap Circle.

State Street, 1801Members of the Jeremy Belknap Circle are invited to an evening at the Bostonian Society located at 206 Washington Street in Boston. Brian LeMay and Nat Sheidley will discuss ongoing plans and lead a tour of the building, including the tower (and its resident ghost). A reception will follow.

To register, please call 617-646-0543 or e-mail awolfe@masshist.org.

Join an MHS Fund Giving Circle today!

close
Biography Seminar The Days of Their Lives: Using Diaries, Journals, and an "Almanack" to Recover the Past 20 March 2014.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, Harvard University; Louisa Thomas, independent scholar and the author of Conscience; Noelle Baker, The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau Moderator: Susan Ware, General Editor, American National Biography

This program will feature a conversation with Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, 300th Anniversary University Professor at Harvard, who is using diaries (men's and women's) in her broader study of Mormon history; Louisa Thomas, an independent scholar and the author of "Conscience" (about her grandfather Norman Thomas), who is writing a biography of Louisa Catherine Adams; and Noelle Baker, Editorial Consultant to The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau, who is preparing a digital edition of Mary Moody Emerson's diary.

close
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 22 March 2014.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

close
Immigration and Urban History Seminar Boston’s Chinatowns and Recent Senior Migration 25 March 2014.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Nicole Newendorp, Harvard University Comment: Wing-kai To, Bridgewater State University

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

close
Library Closed Library Closed 27 March 2014.Thursday, all day

Due to maintenance work in the building the MHS library will be closed to researchers on Thursday, 27 March 2014.  Contact the library staff at 617-646-0532 or library@masshist.org with any questions. 

close
Member Event, Special Event New Faces & New Acquisitions 27 March 2014.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost This event is open only to new MHS Fellows and Members.

Following a reception, new Fellows and Members are invited to join us for a unique opportunity to learn more about and view a selection of the Society's most recent acquisitions, including letters from a stunning collection of Adams and Cranch family correspondence and items from the Civil War archives of Capt. Luis F. Emilio of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment. Enjoy the chance to view Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial. Please call 617-646-0560 or register online by clicking the ticket icon above.

Become a Member today!

close
Special Event, Public Program Tell it with Pride 29 March 2014.Saturday, 12:00PM - 4:00PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment Company A Kathryn Greenthal and Henry Duffy

Visitors are invited to enjoy an afternoon program of exhibition tours and special talks at the MHS related to the Tell It With Pride exhibition.

12:00: Join us for a presentation from the men of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment Company A, a company of civilian re-enactment personnel who keep alive the legacy of the unit through living history displays, educational briefings to the general public, and Civil War period encampments and re-enactments.

1:00 Time to view the exhibition and for informal conversation with the men of the 54th Regiment.

2:00: Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial: Its Context and Its Creation, a lecture by Kathryn Greenthal, author of Augustus Saint-Gaudens: Master Sculptor.

3:00 Consecration and Monument: Robert Gould Shaw and the Massachusetts 54th Regiment, a lecture by Henry Duffy, Curator of Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site in Cornish, NH.

This program is presented in partnership with the Friends of the Public Garden.

To Reserve: Click here to register online or call the MHS reservations line at 617-646-0560. Please register if you plan to attend ANY part of this program (even if you can not join us for the entire afternoon).

close

Back to top