Calendar of Events

Exhibition

Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country

Massachusetts Women in WWI. 12 June 2014 to 24 January 2015

Details

July

Brown Bag Navigating the Other North American Coast: New England Merchants and Sailors Approach the North American Pacific, 1780s-1820s 1 July 2013.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jen Staver, University of California - Irvine This program will present research from a project that investigates social and environmental change ...

This program will present research from a project that investigates social and environmental change along the far Pacific coast of North America from 1760 through 1820 by focusing on knowledge of and labor in the region’s oceanic and littoral landscapes. Beginning in the late eighteenth century, Spanish missionaries and soldiers, Russian hunters, and British traders, as well as New England-based merchants and sailors, began traversing North America’s Pacific coast, forming new relationships between these ocean-based travelers, North American indigenous peoples, and the coastal environment. Using the logs and diaries of sailors as well as the journals, account books, and letters of merchants, the brown-bag presentation will focus on the specific ways that “Boston men” and their backers understood, approached, and literally navigated the physical and the social geographies of the North American Pacific.

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Brown Bag "The Spirit of Enterprise excited by the Acquisition of Louisiana": New Englanders and the Orleans Territory, 1803-1812 3 July 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Lo Faber, Loyola University of New Orleans In 1803 and 1804 New Englanders warily eyed their country's vast new acquisition. Some worried that ...

In 1803 and 1804 New Englanders warily eyed their country's vast new acquisition. Some worried that Louisiana was a “savage,” uncivilized land that would corrupt the new nation; others that it would reduce the already-declining political importance of New England; others that it would become a new addition to the “empire of slavery.” Still others, however, especially Jeffersonian republicans, dismissed these and other concerns and celebrated the Purchase and the economic opportunities it would bring. A few went so far as to move south in search of fortunes in the Orleans Territory.

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Library Closed Fourth of July 4 July 2013.Thursday, all day The MHS library and exhibitions galleries will be closed.

The MHS library and exhibitions galleries will be closed.

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Notice Special 4th of July Exhibition 4 July 2013.Thursday, 12:00PM - 4:00PM The MHS gallery spaces will be open from 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM, including a special exhibition of ...

The MHS gallery spaces will be open from 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM, including a special exhibition of materials related to the Declaration of Independence. 

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 6 July 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

details
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 13 July 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

details
Public Program, Teacher Workshopbegins Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 15 July 2013.Monday, 8:30AM - 3:30PM This workshop will take place at the Massachusetts Historical Society This two-day workshop will focus on how to use local resources – documents, artifacts, ...

This two-day workshop will focus on how to use local resources – documents, artifacts, landscapes and the rich expertise in every town – to examine historical issues with a national focus. We will concentrate on the period just after the Revolution and the concerns and conflicts, hopes and fears, experiences and expectations of the people living in the Boston area at a time of uncertainty, fragility, and possibility. We will investigate such questions as: What was it like to live in a town that had been around for a long time in a country that was new? When the nation was first forming after the Revolution, what were people in our town/region worried about? How much did the geography, economy, culture, and social makeup of our region influence those concerns? How can we find out? What resources/pieces of evidence does our community have that relate to this time period and the people living in it? How can we best present this evidence and allow people of all ages to discover answers to some of these questions? How does our local focus add a crucial dimension to our understanding of a key period in American history?

The workshop is open to teachers, librarians, archivists, members of local historical societies, and all interested local history enthusiasts. Workshop faculty will include Jayne Gordon and Kathleen Barker of the MHS Department of Education and Public Programs, Historian Benjamin Park, MHS Teacher Fellow Betsy Lambert, and Elaine Grublin, MHS Head of Reader Services. There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Saltonstall Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

Additional two-day workshops will be held in the Freedom’s Way National Heritage Area towns of Leominster and Lancaster (central Massachusetts) on July 30/31, at Coolidge Point in Manchester (North Shore) on August 13/14, and in Pittsfield (Berkshires) on November 8/9.

To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

For Additional Information: Contact the Education Department: 617-646-0557 or education@masshist.org.

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Fashion Across Borders and Seas: Print Culture, Women's Networks, and the Creation of Feminine Identities in the British Atlantic World, 1750-1900 15 July 2013.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Anna Bonewitz, University of York Fashion Across Borders and Seas: Print Culture, Women’s Networks, and the Creation of ...

Fashion Across Borders and Seas: Print Culture, Women’s Networks, and the Creation of Feminine Identities in the British Atlantic World, 1750-1900 examines the diverse media through which women learned about fashion, and how ideas of fashion were circulated around and between Britain and the United States from the time of the enigmatic fashion doll, to the birth of modern advertising. 

This project considers how the circulation of visual and material sources for fashion information such as fashion dolls, portraits, fashion illustrations, cartes-de-visite and advertisements, as well as fashion accessories created through reproductive processes such as fans and shawls, was as much a process of learning as it was of sharing. The circulation of these objects enabled women to form valuable networks whereby ideas of femininity, politics, national identity and imperialism were created, solidified and challenged. 

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Public Program, Teacher Workshopends Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 16 July 2013.Tuesday, 8:30AM - 3:30PM This workshop will take place at the Massachusetts Historical Society This two-day workshop will focus on how to use local resources – documents, artifacts, ...

This two-day workshop will focus on how to use local resources – documents, artifacts, landscapes and the rich expertise in every town – to examine historical issues with a national focus. We will concentrate on the period just after the Revolution and the concerns and conflicts, hopes and fears, experiences and expectations of the people living in the Boston area at a time of uncertainty, fragility, and possibility. We will investigate such questions as: What was it like to live in a town that had been around for a long time in a country that was new? When the nation was first forming after the Revolution, what were people in our town/region worried about? How much did the geography, economy, culture, and social makeup of our region influence those concerns? How can we find out? What resources/pieces of evidence does our community have that relate to this time period and the people living in it? How can we best present this evidence and allow people of all ages to discover answers to some of these questions? How does our local focus add a crucial dimension to our understanding of a key period in American history?

The workshop is open to teachers, librarians, archivists, members of local historical societies, and all interested local history enthusiasts. Workshop faculty will include Jayne Gordon and Kathleen Barker of the MHS Department of Education and Public Programs, Historian Benjamin Park, MHS Teacher Fellow Betsy Lambert, and Elaine Grublin, MHS Head of Reader Services. There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Saltonstall Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

Additional two-day workshops will be held in the Freedom’s Way National Heritage Area towns of Leominster and Lancaster (central Massachusetts) on July 30/31, at Coolidge Point in Manchester (North Shore) on August 13/14, and in Pittsfield (Berkshires) on November 8/9.

To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

For Additional Information: Contact the Education Department: 617-646-0557 or education@masshist.org.

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Brown Bag The Book Madness: Charles Deane and the Boston Antiquarians 17 July 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Denise Gigante, Stanford University A discussion of research into a hub of bibliomaniacs associated with the early years of the ...

A discussion of research into a hub of bibliomaniacs associated with the early years of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Among the circle of learned historians, friends of dusty research and poetry, were George Livermore, Charles Deane, Alexander Young, and Edward Crowninshield. Livermore was fond of bibles and illustrated and large paper copies, and Deane kept minutes of his painstaking bibliographic and historical research on fly-leaves, margins, memoranda, and scraps of paper scattered between the pages of his 13,000 books. Together, these amateur men of letters provide a unique outlook on the culture of book collecting and the formation of private and public libraries in mid-19th-century America.

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Public Program Lest We Forget: The Massachusetts 54th 18 July 2013.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Noah Griffin Join us as we commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Massachusetts Fifty-fourth Regiment's attack ...

Join us as we commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Massachusetts Fifty-fourth Regiment's attack against Fort Wagner, South Carolina. The Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment was the first military unit consisting of black soldiers to be raised in the North during the Civil War. Prior to 1863, no concerted effort was made to recruit black troops as Union soldiers. The passage of the Emancipation Proclamation in December of 1862 provided the impetus for the use of free black men as soldiers and, at a time when state governors were responsible for the raising of regiments for federal service, Massachusetts was the first to respond with the formation of the Fifty-fourth Regiment.

Our guest speaker, Noah Griffin, is a man of many talents. Educated at Harvard Law, Yale and Fisk University, he spent 35 years in government, politics, media, and journalism before embarking on a career as a singer, actor, and inspirational speaker. Visit his website to learn more about his work: http://www.noahgriffin.com/Home.html.

Learn more about the Massachusetts Fifty-fourth, as well as the Society's manuscripts and photograph collections related to the regiment at our 54th Regiment! site.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 20 July 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Brown Bag Speculation Nation: Land Speculators and Land Mania in Post-Revolutionary America 24 July 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Michael Blaakman, Yale University This project reconstructs the business and political methods of post-revolutionary land speculators, ...

This project reconstructs the business and political methods of post-revolutionary land speculators, aiming to trace the causes and consequences of the early republic's first wave of large-scale land speculation, from 1776 to 1812. In routing their capital through the new nation’s most important resource, land speculators situated themselves at the center of contentious debates about property, equality, and political economy in a democratic republic. Speculators sought to profit off the extension of the United States' revolutionary republican society; in the process, their methods shaped and changed the Revolution's outcome.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 27 July 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Public Program, Author Talk "The People's Martyr" and the Dorr Rebellion 29 July 2013.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Erik J. Chaput The People's Martyr tells the story of the life of Thomas Wilson Dorr and the 1842 ...

The People's Martyr tells the story of the life of Thomas Wilson Dorr and the 1842 rebellion in Rhode Island that bears his name. Thomas Dorr's attempt at constitutional reform set off a firestorm of debate over the nature of the people's sovereignty in Jacksonian America. Historian Erik J. Chaput devotes particular attention to issues of gender and race, especially the profound fears held by southern politicians that Dorr's ideology would lead to slave insurrections.

Erik J. Chaput received his doctorate in early American History from Syracuse University in 2011. Chaput is on the faculty in the School of Continuing Education at Providence College. Dr. Chaput's research has appeared in numerous publications, including Rhode Island History, Common-Place, American Nineteenth Century History, The New England Quarterly, the U.S. Catholic Historian, The Catholic Historical Review, Historical New Hampshire, and the Historical Journal of Massachusetts. Chaput is the co-editor with Russell J. DeSimone of a digital edition of the letters of Thomas Wilson Dorr. The letters are avilable on the Dorr Rebellion project site hosted by Providence College.

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Teacher Workshop, Public Programbegins Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 30 July 2013.Tuesday, 8:30AM - 3:30PM This workshop will take place in Lancaster & Leominster, Massachusetts, in partnership with the Freedom's Way National Heritage Area. This two-day workshop will focus on how to use local resources – documents, artifacts, ...

This two-day workshop will focus on how to use local resources – documents, artifacts, landscapes and the rich expertise in every town – to examine historical issues with a national focus. We will concentrate on the period just after the Revolution and the concerns and conflicts, hopes and fears, experiences and expectations of the people living in the Boston area at a time of uncertainty, fragility, and possibility. We will investigate such questions as: What was it like to live in a town that had been around for a long time in a country that was new? When the nation was first forming after the Revolution, what were people in our town/region worried about? How much did the geography, economy, culture, and social makeup of our region influence those concerns? How can we find out? What resources/pieces of evidence does our community have that relate to this time period and the people living in it? How can we best present this evidence and allow people of all ages to discover answers to some of these questions? How does our local focus add a crucial dimension to our understanding of a key period in American history?

The workshop is open to teachers, librarians, archivists, members of local historical societies, and all interested local history enthusiasts. Workshop faculty will include Jayne Gordon and Kathleen Barker of the MHS Department of Education and Public Programs, Freedom's Way Director of Education Maud Ayson, Historian Mary Fuhrer, MHS Teacher Fellow Timothy Castner, and Nancy Heywood, MHS Digital Projects Coordinator. Additional partners include the Freedom's Way National Heritage Area, Leominster Public Library, and the First Church of Lancaster. There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Saltonstall Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

Additional two-day workshops will be held in Boston on July 15/16, at Coolidge Point in Manchester (North Shore) on August 13/14, and in Pittsfield (Berkshires) on November 8/9.

To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

For Additional Information: Contact the Education Department: 617-646-0557 or education@masshist.org.

details
Teacher Workshop, Public Programends Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 31 July 2013.Wednesday, 8:30AM - 3:30PM This workshop will take place in Lancaster & Leominster, Massachusetts, in partnership with the Freedom's Way National Heritage Area. This two-day workshop will focus on how to use local resources – documents, artifacts, ...

This two-day workshop will focus on how to use local resources – documents, artifacts, landscapes and the rich expertise in every town – to examine historical issues with a national focus. We will concentrate on the period just after the Revolution and the concerns and conflicts, hopes and fears, experiences and expectations of the people living in the Boston area at a time of uncertainty, fragility, and possibility. We will investigate such questions as: What was it like to live in a town that had been around for a long time in a country that was new? When the nation was first forming after the Revolution, what were people in our town/region worried about? How much did the geography, economy, culture, and social makeup of our region influence those concerns? How can we find out? What resources/pieces of evidence does our community have that relate to this time period and the people living in it? How can we best present this evidence and allow people of all ages to discover answers to some of these questions? How does our local focus add a crucial dimension to our understanding of a key period in American history?

The workshop is open to teachers, librarians, archivists, members of local historical societies, and all interested local history enthusiasts. Workshop faculty will include Jayne Gordon and Kathleen Barker of the MHS Department of Education and Public Programs, Freedom's Way Director of Education Maud Ayson, Historian Mary Fuhrer, MHS Teacher Fellow Timothy Castner, and Nancy Heywood, MHS Digital Projects Coordinator. Additional partners include the Freedom's Way National Heritage Area, Leominster Public Library, and the First Church of Lancaster. There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Saltonstall Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

Additional two-day workshops will be held in Boston on July 15/16, at Coolidge Point in Manchester (North Shore) on August 13/14, and in Pittsfield (Berkshires) on November 8/9.

To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

For Additional Information: Contact the Education Department: 617-646-0557 or education@masshist.org.

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Empire of Learning: Natural Scientists and Caribbean Slavery in the Seventeenth-Century English Atlantic 31 July 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Eric Otremba, Macalester College This project examines confluences between the scientific and progressive ideas associated with the ...

This project examines confluences between the scientific and progressive ideas associated with the early English Enlightenment and the concurrent proliferation of Caribbean slave plantations. Through a study of sugar plantations, it demonstrates how both slavery and the Enlightenment shared common roots within the expansionist discourse of natural science in the late seventeenth century.

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August
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 3 August 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

details
Teacher Workshop, Public Programbegins Battle Road: Crisis, Choices, and Consequences 5 August 2013.Monday, 9:00AM - 5:00PM This workshop includes sessions in Boston, Concord, and Lexington Using historical documents, landscapes, buildings and artifacts as investigative tools, participants ...

Using historical documents, landscapes, buildings and artifacts as investigative tools, participants will examine the concerns, conflicts, dilemmas, decisions, and dramatic confrontations of people along the road to revolution. Presented by the Massachusetts Historical Society and partnering organizations, the workshop takes place in locations throughout Boston, Lexington, Lincoln and Concord. An outstanding group of historians, educators, and site interpreters will work with the group over the course of the four day workshop.

This workshop is open to teachers and the general public, and is funded in part by a grant from the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati. Educators can earn PDPs and 2 graduate credits (for an additional fee) through Framingham State University.

Registration

$125 ($100 for teachers and MHS fellows/members)

Workshop fee includes:

  • Four-day program (daytime, plus one Thursday evening) with additional half day for educators
  • Admission to all partnering sites
  • Packet of reading materials
  • Welcome breakfast on Monday at the Massachusetts Historical Society, lunches on Tuesday (Concord Museum), Wednesday (Lexington Historical Society) and Thursday (Old Manse), and a final evening with living history characters, colonial entertainment, and dessert in Minute Man National Park

To register, complete this registration form and send the form with your payment to:

Kathleen Barker
Massachusetts Historical Society
1154 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02215
education@masshist.org

Complete directions for public transportation options, parking, and special lodging rates in Concord will be sent to all registrants. Questions? Call workshop directors Jayne Gordon (617) 646-0519 or Kathleen Barker (617) 646-0557.

Workshop Schedule

MONDAY, August 5: in Boston
Morning:

  • Welcome breakfast at the Massachusetts Historical Society Introductions of participants, partners, places, and theme
  • The Curious Newspaper Collections of Harbottle Dorr 
  • Documenting the Coming of the American Revolution

Afternoon:

  • Lunch on your own in Boston
  • Background walking tour with Historian Bill Fowler (from the Common to the North End)

TUESDAY, August 6: in Concord
Morning:

  • The Characters and the Community with Historian Bob Gross/ Part 1 (Concord Museum)
  • “Reading” the artifacts in the “Why Concord?” gallery (Concord Museum)

Afternoon:

  • Lunch at the Concord Museum
  • The Characters and the Community with Bob Gross/ Part 2 (Concord Museum)
  • “Reading” the Landscape: the world and worries of the Concord farmer with historian Brian Donahue (Minute Man National Park, Battle Road Farm fields)

WEDNESDAY, August 7: in Lexington
Morning:

  • Paul Revere Capture Site and The Road to Revolution film (Minute Man National Park)
  • Who Shot First 1? Depositions and other accounts with NPS Education Coordinator Jim Hollister (Lexington Green)

Afternoon:

  • Lunch at Munroe Tavern (Lexington Historical Society)
  • The experience of the British soldier (at Munroe Tavern)

THURSDAY, August 8: in Concord and Lincoln

Morning:

  • Using primary source documents to (re)construct lost lives with Historian Mary Fuhrer (Major John Buttrick House, Minute Man National Park)
  • Who Shot First 2? Depositions and other accounts with Jim Hollister (North Bridge)

Afternoon:

  • Lunch and tour of Old Manse: William Emerson, Ralph Waldo Emerson and the Legacy of Revolution
  • Research/Writing workshop: “People at a Crossroads” with Mary Fuhrer and Educator Joanne Myers (on the grounds of the Old Manse)
  •  Break for supper on your own in Concord

Evening:

  • Special living history program “Battle Road Heroes” (Hartwell Tavern historic area, Minute Man National Park)
  • Dessert and colonial entertainment in the Hartwell Barn

FRIDAY, August 9: in Boston

  • Optional morning for educators to work on lesson plans with teacher-facilitator Duncan Wood (MHS)
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Brown Bag Private Lives and Public Spaces: John Banister and Colonial Consumers 7 August 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Marian Desrosiers, Salve Regina University Tourists stream into shops and restaurants on Banister's Wharf in Newport, purchasing products from ...

Tourists stream into shops and restaurants on Banister's Wharf in Newport, purchasing products from Rhode Island and around the globe. When merchant John Banister (1707-1767) owned this wharf in the 1740s, he imported luxury apparel, tools, household items, and foods from many places. For nearly thirty years Banister's ships traded goods from and to other American colonies, the West Indies, and Europe. The Banister account books provide a focus on this golden era of trade. Lists of commodities provide information about the lives of consumers and producers in the public marketplace. The transactions reveal a merchant's family expenses and income. Banister's careful delineation of profit, loss, commissions, taxes, and ownership shares provides insight into his roles as merchant, retailer, ship owner, broker, and as a trade and industry leader of Newport. These details of mid-eighteenth-century Rhode Island reveal how Banister, as an adventurous capitalist, influenced the economy of pre-Revolutionary America.

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Teacher Workshop, Public Programends Battle Road: Crisis, Choices, and Consequences 8 August 2013.Thursday, 9:00AM - 5:00PM This workshop includes sessions in Boston, Concord, and Lexington Using historical documents, landscapes, buildings and artifacts as investigative tools, participants ...

Using historical documents, landscapes, buildings and artifacts as investigative tools, participants will examine the concerns, conflicts, dilemmas, decisions, and dramatic confrontations of people along the road to revolution. Presented by the Massachusetts Historical Society and partnering organizations, the workshop takes place in locations throughout Boston, Lexington, Lincoln and Concord. An outstanding group of historians, educators, and site interpreters will work with the group over the course of the four day workshop.

This workshop is open to teachers and the general public, and is funded in part by a grant from the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati. Educators can earn PDPs and 2 graduate credits (for an additional fee) through Framingham State University.

Registration

$125 ($100 for teachers and MHS fellows/members)

Workshop fee includes:

  • Four-day program (daytime, plus one Thursday evening) with additional half day for educators
  • Admission to all partnering sites
  • Packet of reading materials
  • Welcome breakfast on Monday at the Massachusetts Historical Society, lunches on Tuesday (Concord Museum), Wednesday (Lexington Historical Society) and Thursday (Old Manse), and a final evening with living history characters, colonial entertainment, and dessert in Minute Man National Park

To register, complete this registration form and send the form with your payment to:

Kathleen Barker
Massachusetts Historical Society
1154 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02215
education@masshist.org

Complete directions for public transportation options, parking, and special lodging rates in Concord will be sent to all registrants. Questions? Call workshop directors Jayne Gordon (617) 646-0519 or Kathleen Barker (617) 646-0557.

Workshop Schedule

MONDAY, August 5: in Boston
Morning:

  • Welcome breakfast at the Massachusetts Historical Society Introductions of participants, partners, places, and theme
  • The Curious Newspaper Collections of Harbottle Dorr 
  • Documenting the Coming of the American Revolution

Afternoon:

  • Lunch on your own in Boston
  • Background walking tour with Historian Bill Fowler (from the Common to the North End)

TUESDAY, August 6: in Concord
Morning:

  • The Characters and the Community with Historian Bob Gross/ Part 1 (Concord Museum)
  • “Reading” the artifacts in the “Why Concord?” gallery (Concord Museum)

Afternoon:

  • Lunch at the Concord Museum
  • The Characters and the Community with Bob Gross/ Part 2 (Concord Museum)
  • “Reading” the Landscape: the world and worries of the Concord farmer with historian Brian Donahue (Minute Man National Park, Battle Road Farm fields)

WEDNESDAY, August 7: in Lexington
Morning:

  • Paul Revere Capture Site and The Road to Revolution film (Minute Man National Park)
  • Who Shot First 1? Depositions and other accounts with NPS Education Coordinator Jim Hollister (Lexington Green)

Afternoon:

  • Lunch at Munroe Tavern (Lexington Historical Society)
  • The experience of the British soldier (at Munroe Tavern)

THURSDAY, August 8: in Concord and Lincoln

Morning:

  • Using primary source documents to (re)construct lost lives with Historian Mary Fuhrer (Major John Buttrick House, Minute Man National Park)
  • Who Shot First 2? Depositions and other accounts with Jim Hollister (North Bridge)

Afternoon:

  • Lunch and tour of Old Manse: William Emerson, Ralph Waldo Emerson and the Legacy of Revolution
  • Research/Writing workshop: “People at a Crossroads” with Mary Fuhrer and Educator Joanne Myers (on the grounds of the Old Manse)
  •  Break for supper on your own in Concord

Evening:

  • Special living history program “Battle Road Heroes” (Hartwell Tavern historic area, Minute Man National Park)
  • Dessert and colonial entertainment in the Hartwell Barn

FRIDAY, August 9: in Boston

  • Optional morning for educators to work on lesson plans with teacher-facilitator Duncan Wood (MHS)
details
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 10 August 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

details
Brown Bag Rebelling Subjects, Revealing Objects: The Material and Visual Culture of Making and Remembering the American Revolution 12 August 2013.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Zara Anishanslin, College of Staten Island, CUNY This project considers how women, Loyalists, slaves, and Native Americans, as well as Patriots, ...

This project considers how women, Loyalists, slaves, and Native Americans, as well as Patriots, experienced, made, and remembered the American Revolution from 1763 to 1791, with a coda about historical memory arranged around General Lafayette’s Jubilee Tour. In an effort to get past the binaries that often still characterize the historiography on the Revolution, it uses objects and images to narrate how ideology, politics, and war—and their material practices—were ambivalent and fluid in the revolutionary era.

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Teacher Workshop, Public Programbegins Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 13 August 2013.Tuesday, 8:30AM - 3:30PM This workshop will take place at Coolidge Point in Manchester, Massachusetts This two-day workshop will focus on how to use local resources – documents, artifacts, ...

This two-day workshop will focus on how to use local resources – documents, artifacts, landscapes and the rich expertise in every town – to examine historical issues with a national focus. We will concentrate on the period just after the Revolution and the concerns and conflicts, hopes and fears, experiences and expectations of the people living in the Boston area at a time of uncertainty, fragility, and possibility. We will investigate such questions as: What was it like to live in a town that had been around for a long time in a country that was new? When the nation was first forming after the Revolution, what were people in our town/region worried about? How much did the geography, economy, culture, and social makeup of our region influence those concerns? How can we find out? What resources/pieces of evidence does our community have that relate to this time period and the people living in it? How can we best present this evidence and allow people of all ages to discover answers to some of these questions? How does our local focus add a crucial dimension to our understanding of a key period in American history?

The workshop is open to teachers, librarians, archivists, members of local historical societies, and all interested local history enthusiasts. Workshop faculty will include Jayne Gordon and Kathleen Barker of the MHS Department of Education and Public Programs, Historian Christian Samito, MHS Teacher Fellow Dean Eastman, andLaura Lowell, MHS Manuscript Processor. Worksho ppartners include Salem Maritime National Historic Site and The Trustees of Reservations. There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Saltonstall Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

Additional two-day workshops will be held in Boston on July 15/16, Freedom’s Way National Heritage Area towns of Leominster and Lancaster (central Massachusetts) on July 30/31, and in Pittsfield (Berkshires) on November 8/9.

To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

For Additional Information: Contact the Education Department: 617-646-0557 or education@masshist.org.

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Teacher Workshop, Public Programends Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 14 August 2013.Wednesday, 8:30AM - 3:30PM This workshop will take place at Coolidge Point in Manchester, Massachusetts This two-day workshop will focus on how to use local resources – documents, artifacts, ...

This two-day workshop will focus on how to use local resources – documents, artifacts, landscapes and the rich expertise in every town – to examine historical issues with a national focus. We will concentrate on the period just after the Revolution and the concerns and conflicts, hopes and fears, experiences and expectations of the people living in the Boston area at a time of uncertainty, fragility, and possibility. We will investigate such questions as: What was it like to live in a town that had been around for a long time in a country that was new? When the nation was first forming after the Revolution, what were people in our town/region worried about? How much did the geography, economy, culture, and social makeup of our region influence those concerns? How can we find out? What resources/pieces of evidence does our community have that relate to this time period and the people living in it? How can we best present this evidence and allow people of all ages to discover answers to some of these questions? How does our local focus add a crucial dimension to our understanding of a key period in American history?

The workshop is open to teachers, librarians, archivists, members of local historical societies, and all interested local history enthusiasts. Workshop faculty will include Jayne Gordon and Kathleen Barker of the MHS Department of Education and Public Programs, Historian Christian Samito, MHS Teacher Fellow Dean Eastman, andLaura Lowell, MHS Manuscript Processor. Worksho ppartners include Salem Maritime National Historic Site and The Trustees of Reservations. There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Saltonstall Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

Additional two-day workshops will be held in Boston on July 15/16, Freedom’s Way National Heritage Area towns of Leominster and Lancaster (central Massachusetts) on July 30/31, and in Pittsfield (Berkshires) on November 8/9.

To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

For Additional Information: Contact the Education Department: 617-646-0557 or education@masshist.org.

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Brown Bag Working to Become: Women, Work, and Literary Legacy in American Women’s Postbellum Literature 14 August 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kristin Allukian, University of Florida This project is interdisciplinary in nature and has foundations in both 19th-century American ...

This project is interdisciplinary in nature and has foundations in both 19th-century American women’s history and literature. It focuses on literary representations of career women by late 19th-century American women writers. By reimagining the intertwinings and interconnections of society and women’s paid labor, the project shows that work, and women’s work in particular, was no longer a fixed entity that showed up in the lives of those living during the 19th-century but rather was a shaping force.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 17 August 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Brown Bag Our Peculiar Family: The Massachusetts Schools for Idiotic Children, 1848-1900 21 August 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Kathryn Irving, Yale University In 1848, the first American institutions for children with intellectual disability opened in ...

In 1848, the first American institutions for children with intellectual disability opened in Massachusetts. The state school in Boston was the project of prominent reformers; the private school in Barre was founded by an entrepreneurial physician. Despite their differences, the trajectories of both schools were grounded in the state's social and political climate. This project explores the schools, their staff and pupils, from their antebellum origins up to the Eugenics movement.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 24 August 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Exhibitionends "Estlin Cummings Wild West Show" 30 August 2013.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Monday through Saturday, 10 am to 4 pm “Estlin Cummings Wild West Show” features a selection of E.E. Cummings’s childhood ...

Estlin Cummings Wild West Show“Estlin Cummings Wild West Show” features a selection of E.E. Cummings’s childhood writings and drawings, showcasing the young poet’s earliest experiments with words and illustrations. Drawings and paintings include ink blots, watercolors, and sketches in pen and pencil of cowboys and Indians, boats, the “world’s tallest tower,” wild west shows, hunting expeditions, locomotives, zoos, circuses, elephants, and house plans.

Image: “Estlin Cummings Wild West Show,” drawing by E. E. Cummings. From the Cummings-Clarke family papers. Artwork by E.E. Cummings. Used by permission of the Trustees for the E. E. Cummings Trust.

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Building Closed Labor Day 31 August 2013.Saturday, all day The MHS will be closed Saturday, 31 August, and Monday, 2 September, in observance of Labor Day. The MHS will be closed Saturday, 31 August, and Monday, 2 September, in observance of Labor Day.

The MHS will be closed Saturday, 31 August, and Monday, 2 September, in observance of Labor Day.

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September
Building Closed Labor Day 2 September 2013.Monday, all day The MHS will be closed Saturday, 31 August, and Monday, 2 September, in observance of Labor Day. The MHS will be closed Saturday, 31 August, and Monday, 2 September, in observance of Labor Day.

The MHS will be closed Saturday, 31 August, and Monday, 2 September, in observance of Labor Day.

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Brown Bag Brahmin Capitalism: Bankers, Populists, and the Making of the Modern American Economy 4 September 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Noam Maggor, Vanderbilt University This project charts the business and politics of Boston’s late-nineteenth-century ...

This project charts the business and politics of Boston’s late-nineteenth-century transformation from an anchor of an industrial region into the second largest banking center in North America. It explores how a vanguard of financiers from the city’s old elite created a wide-ranging network of capital flows that funded railroads, mines, agriculture, and industry across the continent, and how this process of capital migration, in turn, redefined urban politics on the local level. Far from seamless, this transformation triggered an array of political controversies over the priorities of city government, and more broadly, over the future shape of American capitalism.

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Exhibitionends "The Education of Our Children Is Never out of My Mind" 7 September 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Monday through Saturday, 10 am to 4 pm From 13 June through 7 September, the Society will display letters written by John and Abigail ...

Letter from John Adams to Abigail, August 28, 1774From 13 June through 7 September, the Society will display letters written by John and Abigail Adams to each other, to their children, and to friends and family regarding their views on education.

In a letter to his wife, Abigail, dated August 28, 1774, John Adams writes: “The Education of our Children is never out of my Mind. Train them to Virtue, habituate them to industry, activity, and Spirit. Make them consider every Vice, as shamefull and unmanly: fire them with Ambition to be usefull-make them disdain to be destitute of any usefull, or ornamental Knowledge or Accomplishment. Fix their Ambition upon great and solid Objects, and their Contempt upon little, frivolous, and useless ones.”

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Object of History Exhibitionends The Object of History: 18th-Century Treasures from the Massachusetts Historical Society 7 September 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Monday through Saturday, 10 AM to 4 PM What is the meaning of historical objects? Why are they preserved, and why have they survived? Are ...

Object of HistoryWhat is the meaning of historical objects? Why are they preserved, and why have they survived? Are they valued for their associations with notable historical figures or landmark events, as objects of beauty, as the survival of relics from a distant past, or for the stories they convey? The exhibition explores these questions through the display of 18th-century portraits and objects from the Society's collections, along with rarely seen engravings, needlework, maps, weapons, furniture, clothing, scientific instruments, and silver.

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Public Program, Author Talk The Great Dissent: How Oliver Wendell Holmes Changes His Mind & Changed the History of Free Speech in America 9 September 2013.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Thomas Healy Free speech as we know it comes less from the First Amendment than from a most unexpected source: ...

Free speech as we know it comes less from the First Amendment than from a most unexpected source: Supreme Court justice Oliver Wendell Holmes. Law professor Thomas Healy reconstructs Holmes’s journey from free-speech opponent to First Amendment hero. It is the story of a remarkable behind-the-scenes campaign by a group of progressives to bring a legal icon around to their way of thinking—and a deeply touching human narrative of an old man saved from loneliness and despair by a few unlikely young friends.

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Brown Bag Friendship in Colonial New England, 1750-1775 11 September 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Jill Bouchillon, University of Stirling This talk will examine the different types of friendships presented in New England's print culture ...

This talk will examine the different types of friendships presented in New England's print culture during the pre-Revolutionary era. Although there is a continuity of interpersonal elements inherently understood about friendship, it is the normative social construction that is particular to time and place. This is perceptible in the popularity of certain texts and characters, in how they were received by New England colonists and how they represented nuances of friendship during the period.

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Public Program, Author Talk History Matters: Reflections on Efforts to Make It Come out Right 12 September 2013.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-talk reception at 5:30 pm Bernard Bailyn, Harvard University A talk by Bernard Bailyn, Adams University Professor and James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early ...

A talk by Bernard Bailyn, Adams University Professor and James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History emeritus at Harvard University. His books include The Barbarous Years: The Peopling of British North America: The Conflict of Civilizations, 1600–1675; The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution, which received the Pulitzer and Bancroft Prizes; The Ordeal of Thomas Hutchinson, which won the National Book Award for History; and Voyagers to the West, which won the Pulitzer Prize.

To Register: Tickets are $10 per person (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617-646-0560 or register online by clicking the ticket icon above.

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Brown Bag Manufacturing Advantage: Boston Merchant-Industrialists and the Federal Government, 1790-1840 18 September 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Lindsay Schakenbach, Brown University This project examines the process by which the federal government made possible the rise of the ...

This project examines the process by which the federal government made possible the rise of the Waltham-Lowell system, the first integrated factory system in the United States. While this predecessor to modern industry is typically viewed as a product of merchant wealth and innovative entrepreneurship, it also benefited from federal support in the form of diplomacy, national expansion, and patent legislation. This research is part of her dissertation, which seeks to explain the early republican transition from merchant to industrial capitalism by analyzing the development of the New England arms and textile industries in the context of federal patronage and expanding U.S. geopolitical dominance in the Americas.

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Smuggler Nation Public Program, Author Talk Smuggler Nation: How Illicit Trade Made America 18 September 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-talk reception at 5:30 pm Peter Andreas, Brown University Providing a sweeping narrative history from colonial times to the present, Smuggler Nation ...

Smuggler NationProviding a sweeping narrative history from colonial times to the present, Smuggler Nation is the first book to retell the story of America as a series of highly contentious battles over clandestine commerce. As Peter Andreas demonstrates, smuggling has played a pivotal role in America's birth, westward expansion, and economic development, while anti-smuggling campaigns have enhanced the federal government's policing powers.

Peter Andreas is Professor of Political Science and International Studies at Brown University. His research focuses on the intersection between security, political economy, and cross-border crime in comparative and historical perspective. His books include, Blue Helmets and Black Markets: The Business of Survival in the Siege of Sarajevo (2008); Policing the Globe: Criminalization and Crime Control in International Relations (2006); and Border Games: Policing the U.S.-Mexico Divide (2nd edition 2009).

To Register: Tickets are $10 per person (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617-646-0560 or register online by clicking the ticket icon above.

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Graduate Student Reception 19 September 2013.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM Calling all graduate students and faculty! Please plan to join us for our fourth annual Graduate ...

Calling all graduate students and faculty! Please plan to join us for our fourth annual Graduate Student Reception. This is a wonderful opportunity for students in history, American Studies, and related fields to meet people from other universities, enjoy great refreshments, and learn about the resources that the MHS has to offer. Last year students from more than a dozen universities participated. This event is free of charge; RSVP required: phone 617-646-0568 or email kviens@masshist.org.

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City Water, City Life Public Program, Author Talk City Water, City Life: The Infrastructure of Ideas in Urbanizing Boston 23 September 2013.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-talk reception at 5:30 pm Carl Smith, Northwestern University This talk will discuss how a city is more than a massing of citizens, a layout of buildings and ...

City Water, City LifeThis talk will discuss how a city is more than a massing of citizens, a layout of buildings and streets, or an arrangement of political, economic, and social institutions. It is also an infrastructure of ideas, an embodiment of the beliefs, values, and aspirations of the people who created it. In no instance was this more the case than in the construction of Boston’s first comprehensive public waterworks, the Cochituate aqueduct system, which opened on 25 October 1848.

Carl Smith is the Franklyn Bliss Snyder Professor of English & American Studies at Northwestern University where he teaches American literature and cultural history. He is the author of numerous books, including Chicago and the American Literary Imagination, 1880-1920 (1984) and of Urban Disorder and the Shape of Belief: The Great Chicago Fire, the Haymarket Bomb, and the Model Town of Pullman (1994), which won the Urban History Association's prize for Best Book in North American Urban History and the Society of Midland Authors' first prize for non-fiction. His most recent book, The Plan of Chicago: Daniel Burnham and the Remaking of the American City (2006), won the Lewis Mumford Prize for Best Book in Planning History, given by the Society of American City, Regional, and Planning History.

To Register: Tickets are $10 per person (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617-646-0560 or register online by clicking the ticket icon above.

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Public Program, Author Talk Amy Lowell Anew 24 September 2013.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Carl Rollyson, Baruch College The controversial American poet Amy Lowell (1874–1925) excelled as the impresario for the ...

The controversial American poet Amy Lowell (1874–1925) excelled as the impresario for the “new poetry” that became news across the U.S. in the years after World War I. This provocative new biography restores Amy Lowell to her full humanity in an era that, at last, is beginning to appreciate the contributions of gays and lesbians to America’s cultural heritage.

Carl Rollyson, professor of journalism at Baruch College, will focus on the discovery of letters in the Society’s collections that altered his understanding of the shape and significance of the poet’s life. Rollyson has published more than 40 books ranging in subject matter from biographies of Marilyn Monroe, Lillian Hellman, Martha Gellhorn, Norman Mailer, Rebecca West, Susan Sontag, Jill Craigie, Dana Andrews, Sylvia Plath, and Amy Lowell to studies of American culture, genealogy, children's biography, film and literary criticism.

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar Emergent Ghettos: Black Neighborhoods in New York and Chicago, 1880-1940 24 September 2013.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required John Logan, Brown University Comment: William Julius Wilson, Harvard University Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568. Authors ...

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

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Brown Bag Narrative of a Journey: Louisa Catherine Adams and the Vexed Question of Identity 25 September 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Louisa Thomas, author of Conscience: Two Soldiers, Two Pacifists, One Family--A Test of Will and Faith in World War I (2011) This program will present research from a forthcoming biography of Louisa Catherine Johnson Adams, ...

This program will present research from a forthcoming biography of Louisa Catherine Johnson Adams, especially focusing on new evidence about her background. It will also explore tensions in her writings, in an attempt to understand her better as a Johnson, as an Adams, and simply as herself. 

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Brown Bag Navigating the Other North American Coast: New England Merchants and Sailors Approach the North American Pacific, 1780s-1820s 1 July 2013.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Jen Staver, University of California - Irvine

This program will present research from a project that investigates social and environmental change along the far Pacific coast of North America from 1760 through 1820 by focusing on knowledge of and labor in the region’s oceanic and littoral landscapes. Beginning in the late eighteenth century, Spanish missionaries and soldiers, Russian hunters, and British traders, as well as New England-based merchants and sailors, began traversing North America’s Pacific coast, forming new relationships between these ocean-based travelers, North American indigenous peoples, and the coastal environment. Using the logs and diaries of sailors as well as the journals, account books, and letters of merchants, the brown-bag presentation will focus on the specific ways that “Boston men” and their backers understood, approached, and literally navigated the physical and the social geographies of the North American Pacific.

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Brown Bag "The Spirit of Enterprise excited by the Acquisition of Louisiana": New Englanders and the Orleans Territory, 1803-1812 3 July 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Lo Faber, Loyola University of New Orleans

In 1803 and 1804 New Englanders warily eyed their country's vast new acquisition. Some worried that Louisiana was a “savage,” uncivilized land that would corrupt the new nation; others that it would reduce the already-declining political importance of New England; others that it would become a new addition to the “empire of slavery.” Still others, however, especially Jeffersonian republicans, dismissed these and other concerns and celebrated the Purchase and the economic opportunities it would bring. A few went so far as to move south in search of fortunes in the Orleans Territory.

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Library Closed Fourth of July 4 July 2013.Thursday, all day

The MHS library and exhibitions galleries will be closed.

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Notice Special 4th of July Exhibition 4 July 2013.Thursday, 12:00PM - 4:00PM

The MHS gallery spaces will be open from 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM, including a special exhibition of materials related to the Declaration of Independence. 

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 6 July 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 13 July 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Public Program, Teacher Workshop Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 15 July 2013 to 16 July 2013 registration required This workshop will take place at the Massachusetts Historical Society

This two-day workshop will focus on how to use local resources – documents, artifacts, landscapes and the rich expertise in every town – to examine historical issues with a national focus. We will concentrate on the period just after the Revolution and the concerns and conflicts, hopes and fears, experiences and expectations of the people living in the Boston area at a time of uncertainty, fragility, and possibility. We will investigate such questions as: What was it like to live in a town that had been around for a long time in a country that was new? When the nation was first forming after the Revolution, what were people in our town/region worried about? How much did the geography, economy, culture, and social makeup of our region influence those concerns? How can we find out? What resources/pieces of evidence does our community have that relate to this time period and the people living in it? How can we best present this evidence and allow people of all ages to discover answers to some of these questions? How does our local focus add a crucial dimension to our understanding of a key period in American history?

The workshop is open to teachers, librarians, archivists, members of local historical societies, and all interested local history enthusiasts. Workshop faculty will include Jayne Gordon and Kathleen Barker of the MHS Department of Education and Public Programs, Historian Benjamin Park, MHS Teacher Fellow Betsy Lambert, and Elaine Grublin, MHS Head of Reader Services. There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Saltonstall Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

Additional two-day workshops will be held in the Freedom’s Way National Heritage Area towns of Leominster and Lancaster (central Massachusetts) on July 30/31, at Coolidge Point in Manchester (North Shore) on August 13/14, and in Pittsfield (Berkshires) on November 8/9.

To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

For Additional Information: Contact the Education Department: 617-646-0557 or education@masshist.org.

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Fashion Across Borders and Seas: Print Culture, Women's Networks, and the Creation of Feminine Identities in the British Atlantic World, 1750-1900 15 July 2013.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Anna Bonewitz, University of York

Fashion Across Borders and Seas: Print Culture, Women’s Networks, and the Creation of Feminine Identities in the British Atlantic World, 1750-1900 examines the diverse media through which women learned about fashion, and how ideas of fashion were circulated around and between Britain and the United States from the time of the enigmatic fashion doll, to the birth of modern advertising. 

This project considers how the circulation of visual and material sources for fashion information such as fashion dolls, portraits, fashion illustrations, cartes-de-visite and advertisements, as well as fashion accessories created through reproductive processes such as fans and shawls, was as much a process of learning as it was of sharing. The circulation of these objects enabled women to form valuable networks whereby ideas of femininity, politics, national identity and imperialism were created, solidified and challenged. 

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Brown Bag The Book Madness: Charles Deane and the Boston Antiquarians 17 July 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Denise Gigante, Stanford University

A discussion of research into a hub of bibliomaniacs associated with the early years of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Among the circle of learned historians, friends of dusty research and poetry, were George Livermore, Charles Deane, Alexander Young, and Edward Crowninshield. Livermore was fond of bibles and illustrated and large paper copies, and Deane kept minutes of his painstaking bibliographic and historical research on fly-leaves, margins, memoranda, and scraps of paper scattered between the pages of his 13,000 books. Together, these amateur men of letters provide a unique outlook on the culture of book collecting and the formation of private and public libraries in mid-19th-century America.

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Public Program Lest We Forget: The Massachusetts 54th 18 July 2013.Thursday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Noah Griffin

Join us as we commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Massachusetts Fifty-fourth Regiment's attack against Fort Wagner, South Carolina. The Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment was the first military unit consisting of black soldiers to be raised in the North during the Civil War. Prior to 1863, no concerted effort was made to recruit black troops as Union soldiers. The passage of the Emancipation Proclamation in December of 1862 provided the impetus for the use of free black men as soldiers and, at a time when state governors were responsible for the raising of regiments for federal service, Massachusetts was the first to respond with the formation of the Fifty-fourth Regiment.

Our guest speaker, Noah Griffin, is a man of many talents. Educated at Harvard Law, Yale and Fisk University, he spent 35 years in government, politics, media, and journalism before embarking on a career as a singer, actor, and inspirational speaker. Visit his website to learn more about his work: http://www.noahgriffin.com/Home.html.

Learn more about the Massachusetts Fifty-fourth, as well as the Society's manuscripts and photograph collections related to the regiment at our 54th Regiment! site.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 20 July 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Brown Bag Speculation Nation: Land Speculators and Land Mania in Post-Revolutionary America 24 July 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Michael Blaakman, Yale University

This project reconstructs the business and political methods of post-revolutionary land speculators, aiming to trace the causes and consequences of the early republic's first wave of large-scale land speculation, from 1776 to 1812. In routing their capital through the new nation’s most important resource, land speculators situated themselves at the center of contentious debates about property, equality, and political economy in a democratic republic. Speculators sought to profit off the extension of the United States' revolutionary republican society; in the process, their methods shaped and changed the Revolution's outcome.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 27 July 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Public Program, Author Talk "The People's Martyr" and the Dorr Rebellion 29 July 2013.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Erik J. Chaput

The People's Martyr tells the story of the life of Thomas Wilson Dorr and the 1842 rebellion in Rhode Island that bears his name. Thomas Dorr's attempt at constitutional reform set off a firestorm of debate over the nature of the people's sovereignty in Jacksonian America. Historian Erik J. Chaput devotes particular attention to issues of gender and race, especially the profound fears held by southern politicians that Dorr's ideology would lead to slave insurrections.

Erik J. Chaput received his doctorate in early American History from Syracuse University in 2011. Chaput is on the faculty in the School of Continuing Education at Providence College. Dr. Chaput's research has appeared in numerous publications, including Rhode Island History, Common-Place, American Nineteenth Century History, The New England Quarterly, the U.S. Catholic Historian, The Catholic Historical Review, Historical New Hampshire, and the Historical Journal of Massachusetts. Chaput is the co-editor with Russell J. DeSimone of a digital edition of the letters of Thomas Wilson Dorr. The letters are avilable on the Dorr Rebellion project site hosted by Providence College.

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Teacher Workshop, Public Program Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 30 July 2013 to 31 July 2013 registration required This workshop will take place in Lancaster & Leominster, Massachusetts, in partnership with the Freedom's Way National Heritage Area.

This two-day workshop will focus on how to use local resources – documents, artifacts, landscapes and the rich expertise in every town – to examine historical issues with a national focus. We will concentrate on the period just after the Revolution and the concerns and conflicts, hopes and fears, experiences and expectations of the people living in the Boston area at a time of uncertainty, fragility, and possibility. We will investigate such questions as: What was it like to live in a town that had been around for a long time in a country that was new? When the nation was first forming after the Revolution, what were people in our town/region worried about? How much did the geography, economy, culture, and social makeup of our region influence those concerns? How can we find out? What resources/pieces of evidence does our community have that relate to this time period and the people living in it? How can we best present this evidence and allow people of all ages to discover answers to some of these questions? How does our local focus add a crucial dimension to our understanding of a key period in American history?

The workshop is open to teachers, librarians, archivists, members of local historical societies, and all interested local history enthusiasts. Workshop faculty will include Jayne Gordon and Kathleen Barker of the MHS Department of Education and Public Programs, Freedom's Way Director of Education Maud Ayson, Historian Mary Fuhrer, MHS Teacher Fellow Timothy Castner, and Nancy Heywood, MHS Digital Projects Coordinator. Additional partners include the Freedom's Way National Heritage Area, Leominster Public Library, and the First Church of Lancaster. There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Saltonstall Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

Additional two-day workshops will be held in Boston on July 15/16, at Coolidge Point in Manchester (North Shore) on August 13/14, and in Pittsfield (Berkshires) on November 8/9.

To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

For Additional Information: Contact the Education Department: 617-646-0557 or education@masshist.org.

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Empire of Learning: Natural Scientists and Caribbean Slavery in the Seventeenth-Century English Atlantic 31 July 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Eric Otremba, Macalester College

This project examines confluences between the scientific and progressive ideas associated with the early English Enlightenment and the concurrent proliferation of Caribbean slave plantations. Through a study of sugar plantations, it demonstrates how both slavery and the Enlightenment shared common roots within the expansionist discourse of natural science in the late seventeenth century.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 3 August 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Teacher Workshop, Public Program Battle Road: Crisis, Choices, and Consequences 5 August 2013 to 8 August 2013 registration required This workshop includes sessions in Boston, Concord, and Lexington

Using historical documents, landscapes, buildings and artifacts as investigative tools, participants will examine the concerns, conflicts, dilemmas, decisions, and dramatic confrontations of people along the road to revolution. Presented by the Massachusetts Historical Society and partnering organizations, the workshop takes place in locations throughout Boston, Lexington, Lincoln and Concord. An outstanding group of historians, educators, and site interpreters will work with the group over the course of the four day workshop.

This workshop is open to teachers and the general public, and is funded in part by a grant from the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati. Educators can earn PDPs and 2 graduate credits (for an additional fee) through Framingham State University.

Registration

$125 ($100 for teachers and MHS fellows/members)

Workshop fee includes:

  • Four-day program (daytime, plus one Thursday evening) with additional half day for educators
  • Admission to all partnering sites
  • Packet of reading materials
  • Welcome breakfast on Monday at the Massachusetts Historical Society, lunches on Tuesday (Concord Museum), Wednesday (Lexington Historical Society) and Thursday (Old Manse), and a final evening with living history characters, colonial entertainment, and dessert in Minute Man National Park

To register, complete this registration form and send the form with your payment to:

Kathleen Barker
Massachusetts Historical Society
1154 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02215
education@masshist.org

Complete directions for public transportation options, parking, and special lodging rates in Concord will be sent to all registrants. Questions? Call workshop directors Jayne Gordon (617) 646-0519 or Kathleen Barker (617) 646-0557.

Workshop Schedule

MONDAY, August 5: in Boston
Morning:

  • Welcome breakfast at the Massachusetts Historical Society Introductions of participants, partners, places, and theme
  • The Curious Newspaper Collections of Harbottle Dorr 
  • Documenting the Coming of the American Revolution

Afternoon:

  • Lunch on your own in Boston
  • Background walking tour with Historian Bill Fowler (from the Common to the North End)

TUESDAY, August 6: in Concord
Morning:

  • The Characters and the Community with Historian Bob Gross/ Part 1 (Concord Museum)
  • “Reading” the artifacts in the “Why Concord?” gallery (Concord Museum)

Afternoon:

  • Lunch at the Concord Museum
  • The Characters and the Community with Bob Gross/ Part 2 (Concord Museum)
  • “Reading” the Landscape: the world and worries of the Concord farmer with historian Brian Donahue (Minute Man National Park, Battle Road Farm fields)

WEDNESDAY, August 7: in Lexington
Morning:

  • Paul Revere Capture Site and The Road to Revolution film (Minute Man National Park)
  • Who Shot First 1? Depositions and other accounts with NPS Education Coordinator Jim Hollister (Lexington Green)

Afternoon:

  • Lunch at Munroe Tavern (Lexington Historical Society)
  • The experience of the British soldier (at Munroe Tavern)

THURSDAY, August 8: in Concord and Lincoln

Morning:

  • Using primary source documents to (re)construct lost lives with Historian Mary Fuhrer (Major John Buttrick House, Minute Man National Park)
  • Who Shot First 2? Depositions and other accounts with Jim Hollister (North Bridge)

Afternoon:

  • Lunch and tour of Old Manse: William Emerson, Ralph Waldo Emerson and the Legacy of Revolution
  • Research/Writing workshop: “People at a Crossroads” with Mary Fuhrer and Educator Joanne Myers (on the grounds of the Old Manse)
  •  Break for supper on your own in Concord

Evening:

  • Special living history program “Battle Road Heroes” (Hartwell Tavern historic area, Minute Man National Park)
  • Dessert and colonial entertainment in the Hartwell Barn

FRIDAY, August 9: in Boston

  • Optional morning for educators to work on lesson plans with teacher-facilitator Duncan Wood (MHS)
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Brown Bag Private Lives and Public Spaces: John Banister and Colonial Consumers 7 August 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Marian Desrosiers, Salve Regina University

Tourists stream into shops and restaurants on Banister's Wharf in Newport, purchasing products from Rhode Island and around the globe. When merchant John Banister (1707-1767) owned this wharf in the 1740s, he imported luxury apparel, tools, household items, and foods from many places. For nearly thirty years Banister's ships traded goods from and to other American colonies, the West Indies, and Europe. The Banister account books provide a focus on this golden era of trade. Lists of commodities provide information about the lives of consumers and producers in the public marketplace. The transactions reveal a merchant's family expenses and income. Banister's careful delineation of profit, loss, commissions, taxes, and ownership shares provides insight into his roles as merchant, retailer, ship owner, broker, and as a trade and industry leader of Newport. These details of mid-eighteenth-century Rhode Island reveal how Banister, as an adventurous capitalist, influenced the economy of pre-Revolutionary America.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 10 August 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Brown Bag Rebelling Subjects, Revealing Objects: The Material and Visual Culture of Making and Remembering the American Revolution 12 August 2013.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Zara Anishanslin, College of Staten Island, CUNY

This project considers how women, Loyalists, slaves, and Native Americans, as well as Patriots, experienced, made, and remembered the American Revolution from 1763 to 1791, with a coda about historical memory arranged around General Lafayette’s Jubilee Tour. In an effort to get past the binaries that often still characterize the historiography on the Revolution, it uses objects and images to narrate how ideology, politics, and war—and their material practices—were ambivalent and fluid in the revolutionary era.

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Teacher Workshop, Public Program Old Towns/New Country: The First Years of a New Nation 13 August 2013 to 14 August 2013 registration required This workshop will take place at Coolidge Point in Manchester, Massachusetts

This two-day workshop will focus on how to use local resources – documents, artifacts, landscapes and the rich expertise in every town – to examine historical issues with a national focus. We will concentrate on the period just after the Revolution and the concerns and conflicts, hopes and fears, experiences and expectations of the people living in the Boston area at a time of uncertainty, fragility, and possibility. We will investigate such questions as: What was it like to live in a town that had been around for a long time in a country that was new? When the nation was first forming after the Revolution, what were people in our town/region worried about? How much did the geography, economy, culture, and social makeup of our region influence those concerns? How can we find out? What resources/pieces of evidence does our community have that relate to this time period and the people living in it? How can we best present this evidence and allow people of all ages to discover answers to some of these questions? How does our local focus add a crucial dimension to our understanding of a key period in American history?

The workshop is open to teachers, librarians, archivists, members of local historical societies, and all interested local history enthusiasts. Workshop faculty will include Jayne Gordon and Kathleen Barker of the MHS Department of Education and Public Programs, Historian Christian Samito, MHS Teacher Fellow Dean Eastman, andLaura Lowell, MHS Manuscript Processor. Worksho ppartners include Salem Maritime National Historic Site and The Trustees of Reservations. There is a $25 charge to cover lunches both days; program and material costs have been generously funded by the Saltonstall Foundation. Educators can earn 14 PDPs and 1 Graduate Credit (for an additional fee) from Framingham State University.

Additional two-day workshops will be held in Boston on July 15/16, Freedom’s Way National Heritage Area towns of Leominster and Lancaster (central Massachusetts) on July 30/31, and in Pittsfield (Berkshires) on November 8/9.

To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your payment to: Kathleen Barker, Massachusetts Historical Society, 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215.

For Additional Information: Contact the Education Department: 617-646-0557 or education@masshist.org.

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Brown Bag Working to Become: Women, Work, and Literary Legacy in American Women’s Postbellum Literature 14 August 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Kristin Allukian, University of Florida

This project is interdisciplinary in nature and has foundations in both 19th-century American women’s history and literature. It focuses on literary representations of career women by late 19th-century American women writers. By reimagining the intertwinings and interconnections of society and women’s paid labor, the project shows that work, and women’s work in particular, was no longer a fixed entity that showed up in the lives of those living during the 19th-century but rather was a shaping force.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 17 August 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Brown Bag Our Peculiar Family: The Massachusetts Schools for Idiotic Children, 1848-1900 21 August 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Kathryn Irving, Yale University

In 1848, the first American institutions for children with intellectual disability opened in Massachusetts. The state school in Boston was the project of prominent reformers; the private school in Barre was founded by an entrepreneurial physician. Despite their differences, the trajectories of both schools were grounded in the state's social and political climate. This project explores the schools, their staff and pupils, from their antebellum origins up to the Eugenics movement.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 24 August 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Exhibition "Estlin Cummings Wild West Show" 30 August 2013.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM this event is free Monday through Saturday, 10 am to 4 pm

Estlin Cummings Wild West Show“Estlin Cummings Wild West Show” features a selection of E.E. Cummings’s childhood writings and drawings, showcasing the young poet’s earliest experiments with words and illustrations. Drawings and paintings include ink blots, watercolors, and sketches in pen and pencil of cowboys and Indians, boats, the “world’s tallest tower,” wild west shows, hunting expeditions, locomotives, zoos, circuses, elephants, and house plans.

Image: “Estlin Cummings Wild West Show,” drawing by E. E. Cummings. From the Cummings-Clarke family papers. Artwork by E.E. Cummings. Used by permission of the Trustees for the E. E. Cummings Trust.

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Building Closed Labor Day 31 August 2013.Saturday, all day The MHS will be closed Saturday, 31 August, and Monday, 2 September, in observance of Labor Day.

The MHS will be closed Saturday, 31 August, and Monday, 2 September, in observance of Labor Day.

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Building Closed Labor Day 2 September 2013.Monday, all day The MHS will be closed Saturday, 31 August, and Monday, 2 September, in observance of Labor Day.

The MHS will be closed Saturday, 31 August, and Monday, 2 September, in observance of Labor Day.

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Brown Bag Brahmin Capitalism: Bankers, Populists, and the Making of the Modern American Economy 4 September 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Noam Maggor, Vanderbilt University

This project charts the business and politics of Boston’s late-nineteenth-century transformation from an anchor of an industrial region into the second largest banking center in North America. It explores how a vanguard of financiers from the city’s old elite created a wide-ranging network of capital flows that funded railroads, mines, agriculture, and industry across the continent, and how this process of capital migration, in turn, redefined urban politics on the local level. Far from seamless, this transformation triggered an array of political controversies over the priorities of city government, and more broadly, over the future shape of American capitalism.

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Exhibition "The Education of Our Children Is Never out of My Mind" 7 September 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM this event is free Monday through Saturday, 10 am to 4 pm

Letter from John Adams to Abigail, August 28, 1774From 13 June through 7 September, the Society will display letters written by John and Abigail Adams to each other, to their children, and to friends and family regarding their views on education.

In a letter to his wife, Abigail, dated August 28, 1774, John Adams writes: “The Education of our Children is never out of my Mind. Train them to Virtue, habituate them to industry, activity, and Spirit. Make them consider every Vice, as shamefull and unmanly: fire them with Ambition to be usefull-make them disdain to be destitute of any usefull, or ornamental Knowledge or Accomplishment. Fix their Ambition upon great and solid Objects, and their Contempt upon little, frivolous, and useless ones.”

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Exhibition The Object of History: 18th-Century Treasures from the Massachusetts Historical Society 7 September 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM this event is free Monday through Saturday, 10 AM to 4 PM Object of History

Object of HistoryWhat is the meaning of historical objects? Why are they preserved, and why have they survived? Are they valued for their associations with notable historical figures or landmark events, as objects of beauty, as the survival of relics from a distant past, or for the stories they convey? The exhibition explores these questions through the display of 18th-century portraits and objects from the Society's collections, along with rarely seen engravings, needlework, maps, weapons, furniture, clothing, scientific instruments, and silver.

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Public Program, Author Talk The Great Dissent: How Oliver Wendell Holmes Changes His Mind & Changed the History of Free Speech in America 9 September 2013.Monday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Thomas Healy

Free speech as we know it comes less from the First Amendment than from a most unexpected source: Supreme Court justice Oliver Wendell Holmes. Law professor Thomas Healy reconstructs Holmes’s journey from free-speech opponent to First Amendment hero. It is the story of a remarkable behind-the-scenes campaign by a group of progressives to bring a legal icon around to their way of thinking—and a deeply touching human narrative of an old man saved from loneliness and despair by a few unlikely young friends.

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Brown Bag Friendship in Colonial New England, 1750-1775 11 September 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Jill Bouchillon, University of Stirling

This talk will examine the different types of friendships presented in New England's print culture during the pre-Revolutionary era. Although there is a continuity of interpersonal elements inherently understood about friendship, it is the normative social construction that is particular to time and place. This is perceptible in the popularity of certain texts and characters, in how they were received by New England colonists and how they represented nuances of friendship during the period.

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Public Program, Author Talk History Matters: Reflections on Efforts to Make It Come out Right 12 September 2013.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30 pm Bernard Bailyn, Harvard University

A talk by Bernard Bailyn, Adams University Professor and James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History emeritus at Harvard University. His books include The Barbarous Years: The Peopling of British North America: The Conflict of Civilizations, 1600–1675; The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution, which received the Pulitzer and Bancroft Prizes; The Ordeal of Thomas Hutchinson, which won the National Book Award for History; and Voyagers to the West, which won the Pulitzer Prize.

To Register: Tickets are $10 per person (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617-646-0560 or register online by clicking the ticket icon above.

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Brown Bag Manufacturing Advantage: Boston Merchant-Industrialists and the Federal Government, 1790-1840 18 September 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Lindsay Schakenbach, Brown University

This project examines the process by which the federal government made possible the rise of the Waltham-Lowell system, the first integrated factory system in the United States. While this predecessor to modern industry is typically viewed as a product of merchant wealth and innovative entrepreneurship, it also benefited from federal support in the form of diplomacy, national expansion, and patent legislation. This research is part of her dissertation, which seeks to explain the early republican transition from merchant to industrial capitalism by analyzing the development of the New England arms and textile industries in the context of federal patronage and expanding U.S. geopolitical dominance in the Americas.

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Public Program, Author Talk Smuggler Nation: How Illicit Trade Made America 18 September 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30 pm Peter Andreas, Brown University Smuggler Nation

Smuggler NationProviding a sweeping narrative history from colonial times to the present, Smuggler Nation is the first book to retell the story of America as a series of highly contentious battles over clandestine commerce. As Peter Andreas demonstrates, smuggling has played a pivotal role in America's birth, westward expansion, and economic development, while anti-smuggling campaigns have enhanced the federal government's policing powers.

Peter Andreas is Professor of Political Science and International Studies at Brown University. His research focuses on the intersection between security, political economy, and cross-border crime in comparative and historical perspective. His books include, Blue Helmets and Black Markets: The Business of Survival in the Siege of Sarajevo (2008); Policing the Globe: Criminalization and Crime Control in International Relations (2006); and Border Games: Policing the U.S.-Mexico Divide (2nd edition 2009).

To Register: Tickets are $10 per person (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617-646-0560 or register online by clicking the ticket icon above.

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Graduate Student Reception 19 September 2013.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM this event is free

Calling all graduate students and faculty! Please plan to join us for our fourth annual Graduate Student Reception. This is a wonderful opportunity for students in history, American Studies, and related fields to meet people from other universities, enjoy great refreshments, and learn about the resources that the MHS has to offer. Last year students from more than a dozen universities participated. This event is free of charge; RSVP required: phone 617-646-0568 or email kviens@masshist.org.

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Public Program, Author Talk City Water, City Life: The Infrastructure of Ideas in Urbanizing Boston 23 September 2013.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-talk reception at 5:30 pm Carl Smith, Northwestern University City Water, City Life

City Water, City LifeThis talk will discuss how a city is more than a massing of citizens, a layout of buildings and streets, or an arrangement of political, economic, and social institutions. It is also an infrastructure of ideas, an embodiment of the beliefs, values, and aspirations of the people who created it. In no instance was this more the case than in the construction of Boston’s first comprehensive public waterworks, the Cochituate aqueduct system, which opened on 25 October 1848.

Carl Smith is the Franklyn Bliss Snyder Professor of English & American Studies at Northwestern University where he teaches American literature and cultural history. He is the author of numerous books, including Chicago and the American Literary Imagination, 1880-1920 (1984) and of Urban Disorder and the Shape of Belief: The Great Chicago Fire, the Haymarket Bomb, and the Model Town of Pullman (1994), which won the Urban History Association's prize for Best Book in North American Urban History and the Society of Midland Authors' first prize for non-fiction. His most recent book, The Plan of Chicago: Daniel Burnham and the Remaking of the American City (2006), won the Lewis Mumford Prize for Best Book in Planning History, given by the Society of American City, Regional, and Planning History.

To Register: Tickets are $10 per person (no charge for Fellows and Members). Please call 617-646-0560 or register online by clicking the ticket icon above.

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Public Program, Author Talk Amy Lowell Anew 24 September 2013.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Carl Rollyson, Baruch College

The controversial American poet Amy Lowell (1874–1925) excelled as the impresario for the “new poetry” that became news across the U.S. in the years after World War I. This provocative new biography restores Amy Lowell to her full humanity in an era that, at last, is beginning to appreciate the contributions of gays and lesbians to America’s cultural heritage.

Carl Rollyson, professor of journalism at Baruch College, will focus on the discovery of letters in the Society’s collections that altered his understanding of the shape and significance of the poet’s life. Rollyson has published more than 40 books ranging in subject matter from biographies of Marilyn Monroe, Lillian Hellman, Martha Gellhorn, Norman Mailer, Rebecca West, Susan Sontag, Jill Craigie, Dana Andrews, Sylvia Plath, and Amy Lowell to studies of American culture, genealogy, children's biography, film and literary criticism.

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar Emergent Ghettos: Black Neighborhoods in New York and Chicago, 1880-1940 24 September 2013.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
John Logan, Brown University Comment: William Julius Wilson, Harvard University

Be sure to RSVP for this program by emailing seminars@masshist.org or phoning 617-646-0568.

Authors will not read their essays but will offer brief remarks; please read the paper ahead of time and come prepared to join in the discussion. If you are not a subscriber to the series (subscribers receive online advance access to the papers) you may pick up a copy at the MHS front desk on the day of the program. Please phone 617-646-0568 with any questions.

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Brown Bag Narrative of a Journey: Louisa Catherine Adams and the Vexed Question of Identity 25 September 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Louisa Thomas, author of Conscience: Two Soldiers, Two Pacifists, One Family--A Test of Will and Faith in World War I (2011)

This program will present research from a forthcoming biography of Louisa Catherine Johnson Adams, especially focusing on new evidence about her background. It will also explore tensions in her writings, in an attempt to understand her better as a Johnson, as an Adams, and simply as herself. 

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