Calendar of Events

Exhibition

Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country

Massachusetts Women in WWI. 12 June 2014 to 24 January 2015

Details

January

Pen used to sign Emancipation Proclamation Forever Free: Lincoln & the Emancipation Proclamation - Open 1 January 1 January 2013.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 4:00PM Tuesday, 1 January from 12 PM to 4 PM In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation on 1 ...

Pen used to sign Emancipation ProclamationIn commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation on 1 January 1863, this exhibition features the pen Abraham Lincoln used to sign the document. Visitors can learn how the MHS acquired this extraordinary pen as well as view paintings, broadsides, engravings, and manuscripts that tell the story of how Boston celebrated Emancipation.

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Notice Galleries Open 1 January 2013.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 4:00PM The exhibition galleries will be open 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM. 

The exhibition galleries will be open 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM. 

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Bronze cast of Abraham Lincoln Lincoln in Manuscript & Artifact - Open 1 January 1 January 2013.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 4:00PM Tuesday, 1 January from 12 PM to 4 PM View documents and artifacts related to Abraham Lincoln. Featured items include Lincoln's letter ...

Bronze cast of Abraham LincolnView documents and artifacts related to Abraham Lincoln. Featured items include Lincoln's letter to Joshua F. Speed explaining his evolving views on slavery as well as the casts of the life mask and hands of Lincoln made by Leonard Volk in the spring of 1860.

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Library Closed New Year's Day 1 January 2013.Tuesday, all day details
Public Program, Exhibition The 150th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation 1 January 2013.Tuesday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Exhibition Spotlight Peter Drummey & Anne Bentley, Massachusetts Historical Society When news arrived in Boston on New Year’s Day 1863 that Lincoln had signed the Emancipation ...

When news arrived in Boston on New Year’s Day 1863 that Lincoln had signed the Emancipation Proclamation, long-planned celebrations, the largest anywhere in the United States, already were underway. MHS Librarian Peter Drummey and Curator of Art Anne Bentley will explain how this epochal event in American History became an extraordinary moment in Boston history, and how the pen Lincoln used to sign the proclamation became one of the most treasured artifacts in the MHS collection.

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Pen used to sign Emancipation Proclamation Exhibitionbegins Forever Free: Lincoln & the Emancipation Proclamation 2 January 2013.Wednesday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation on 1 ...

Pen used to sign Emancipation ProclamationIn commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation on 1 January 1863, this exhibition features the pen Abraham Lincoln used to sign the document. Visitors can learn how the MHS acquired this extraordinary pen as well as view paintings, broadsides, engravings, and manuscripts that tell the story of how Boston celebrated Emancipation.

details
Bronze cast of Abraham Lincoln Exhibitionbegins Lincoln in Manuscript & Artifact 2 January 2013.Wednesday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM View documents and artifacts related to Abraham Lincoln. Featured items include Lincoln's letter to ...

Bronze cast of Abraham LincolnView documents and artifacts related to Abraham Lincoln. Featured items include Lincoln's letter to Joshua F. Speed explaining his evolving views on slavery as well as the casts of the life mask and hands of Lincoln made by Leonard Volk in the spring of 1860.

details
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 5 January 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Brown Bag American Insides: Popular Narrative and the Historiography of Sexuality, 1675-1815 9 January 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Greta LaFleur, University of Hawai'i at Manoa details
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 12 January 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Environmental History Seminar “Whither Have All the Forests Gone": A Case of Land Preservation in Suburban Washington 15 January 2013.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required John Spiers, Boston College Comment: James Levitt, Harvard Forest This paper examines a frustrating question for those concerned with environmental issues: Why has ...

This paper examines a frustrating question for those concerned with environmental issues: Why has land preservation been such a challenge for suburbs in the late 20th century? It considers how land preservation occurs by offering a case study of a grassroots environmental movement in Fairfax County that formed around 1970 in response to plans for a single-family residential development adjacent to the Potomac River.

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Public Program America's Second Revolution: New England, Old England, & the Civil War 19 January 2013.Saturday, 2:00PM - 3:30PM Please RSVP   Len Gougeon, University of Scranton Why did most of Great Britain’s intellectual and artistic class sympathize with the ...

Why did most of Great Britain’s intellectual and artistic class sympathize with the Confederacy, either overtly or covertly, during the Civil War? This presentation examines the cultural conflict that erupted between New England poets and intellectuals and their British counterparts as a result of tensions arising out of the Civil War. Prof. Gougeon is a Distinguished University Fellow at the University of Scranton, where he teaches American literature. He is the author of Virtue’s Hero: Emerson, Antislavery, and Reform and Emerson and Eros: The Making of a Cultural Hero.

This event is co-sponsored by The New England Quarterly.

Reservations requeted. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0560 / education@masshist.org.

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Building Closed Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 21 January 2013.Monday, all day details
Biography Seminar Biographers' Round Table: A Conversation with Stacy Schiff 24 January 2013.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Stacy Schiff, Pulitizer-Prize winning author Moderator: Susan Ware Pulitizer-Prize winning author Stacy Schiff will discuss her career as a writer and biographer in ...

Pulitizer-Prize winning author Stacy Schiff will discuss her career as a writer and biographer in conversation with Susan Ware. 

Stacy Schiff's most recent book is Cleopatra: A Life (2010), which was named one of the New York Times Book Review's top ten books of the year.  Her previous books include A Great Improvisation: Franklin, France, and the Birth of America (2005), Vera (Mrs. Vladimir Nabakov): Portrait of a Marriage (1999), which won the Pulitizer Prize, and Saint-Exupery: A Biography (1994). 

Susan Ware is an independent scholar who specializes in twentieth-century U.S. History, women's history, and biography.  Her most recent book is Game, Set, Match: Billie Jean King and the Revolution in Women's Sports (2011).

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Public Program, Exhibition The Real Gettysburg Address 25 January 2013.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Exhibition Spotlight Peter Drummey, Massachusetts Historical Society Edward Everett is known to history as the “other” speaker at the commemoration of the ...

Edward Everett is known to history as the “other” speaker at the commemoration of the National Cemetery at Gettysburg – the man who, by his own admission, in two hours could not accomplish what Lincoln did in two minutes. Learn more about who said what—and why—at Gettysburg, and view letters exchanged by Lincoln and Everett.

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar "Pretended love of personal liberty": Antislavery, Nativism, and Deportation Policy in Antebellum Massachusetts 29 January 2013.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Hidetaka Hirota, Boston College Comment: Lucy Salyer, University of New Hampshire This paper explores the implementation of deportation policy during the 1850s, when anti-Irish ...

This paper explores the implementation of deportation policy during the 1850s, when anti-Irish nativism reached its zenith with the rise of nativist politicians, the Know Nothings, in state politics. In particular, it examines the contradiction between the defense of African Americans’ personal liberty and the seizure of Irish immigrants by exposing the tangible presence of nativist force in the antislavery movement.

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Conversation, Public Program Dumb Witnesses: Relics of George Washington at the Massachusetts Historical Society 30 January 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 PM Peter Drummey, Massachusetts Historical Society Part of "The Object of History" series From the beginnings of the MHS, George Washington has been the subject of fascination and veneration ...

From the beginnings of the MHS, George Washington has been the subject of fascination and veneration. What does the Society’s early collection of Washington artifacts and documents say about the founding of the MHS—and the image of Washington in the early Republic?

The Object of History
A series of chats with MHS Librarian Peter Drummey about what documents and artifacts from the collections can tell us about the characters, events, and issues of the past, as well as the role of MHS in documenting the rich history of our state and nation.

Registration Required. Fee $25/$15 (F/M); Free for MHS Fund Giving Circle members. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0557 / education@masshist.org.

Register for all three programs in “The Object of History” series and receive a registration discount! Series fee: $60/30 (F/M); Free for MHS Fund Circle members.

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In Death Lamented Exhibitionends In Death Lamented: The Tradition of Anglo-American Mourning Jewelry 31 January 2013.Thursday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Monday through Saturday, 10 AM to 4 PM In Death Lamented features rings, bracelets, brooches, and other pieces of mourning jewelry ...

In Death LamentedIn Death Lamented features rings, bracelets, brooches, and other pieces of mourning jewelry from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, ranging from early gold bands with death’s head iconography to jeweled brooches and intricately woven hairwork pieces of the Civil War era. These elegant and evocative objects are presented in the context of their history, use, and meaning, alongside related pieces of material culture.

Drawn from the collections of the MHS and Guest Curator Sarah Nehama as well as loans from the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Historic New England in Boston, and the Adams National Historical Park in Quincy, exhibition highlights include the Adams-Winthrop commemorative seal ring containing the braided hair of John Quincy Adams and a gold memorial ring for Queen Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach.

A full-color companion book, In Death Lamented: The Tradition of Anglo-American Mourning Jewelry, available for sale at the MHS, features photographs and descriptions of all of the Nehama and MHS pieces, along with historical and stylistic backgrounds and essays pertaining to cultural practices around death and mourning in England and America.

View a selection of mourning jewelry at www.masshist.org/features/mourning-jewelry.

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February
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 2 February 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Early American History Seminar Panel Discussion: Race, Religion, and Freedom in the 18th Century North 5 February 2013.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Location: Old State House Richard Boles, George Washington University, and Jared Hardesty, Boston College Comment: Linford Fisher, Brown University Discussion will focus on two seminar papers: “African American and Indian Church Affiliation: ...

Discussion will focus on two seminar papers: “African American and Indian Church Affiliation: Reevaluating Race and Religion in the North, 1730-1776,” by Richard Boles of George Washington University, and  “A World of Deference and Dependence: Slavery and Unfreedom in Eighteenth-century Boston,” by Jared Hardesty of Boston College. Boles’s paper explores black and Indian participation in each major Protestant denomination, suggesting the need to reevaluate aspects of the religious history of the colonial North in regard to how blacks and Indians influenced theology and church practices. Hardesty’s essay aims to raise serious questions about the nature of freedom in the American Colonies by engaging the literature concerning liberty in early America and challenging the popular slave/free dichotomy that dominates the historiography.

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Brown Bag Finding Sedgwick In the Archives: Recent Discoveries in the Complex Life of Catharine Maria Sedgwick (1789-1867) 6 February 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Lucinda Damon-Bach, Salem State University Internationally famous author, pioneering Unitarian, rural and urban benevolent worker, sister to ...

Internationally famous author, pioneering Unitarian, rural and urban benevolent worker, sister to six siblings, active aunt to 37 nieces and nephews, and prolific correspondent, Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s fascinating life deserves a full-length biography. With over 4,000 letters in addition to personal journals at the MHS, there is much to examine. In her brown bag talk Lucinda Damon-Bach will share some of the questions and discoveries to date that are helping her to clear up misconceptions and prepare a long-overdue book about Sedgwick’s life and work.

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History of Women and Gender Seminar Partus Sequitur Ventrem: Slave Law and the History of Women in Slavery 7 February 2013.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Location: Schlesinger Library Jennifer Morgan, New York University Comment: Linda Heywood, Boston University details
Building Closed Library & Exhibitions Closing @ 12:30 8 February 2013.Friday, all day details
Building Closed Library & Exhibitions Closed 9 February 2013.Saturday, all day details
Notice Opening @ Noon 11 February 2013.Monday, all day details
Author Talk, Public Program Lincoln & Liberty, Too 11 February 2013.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 PM William Martin In March 1861, when Lincoln delivered his First Inaugural, neither he nor many in the audience ...

William Martin The Lincoln LetterIn March 1861, when Lincoln delivered his First Inaugural, neither he nor many in the audience envisioned that four years later, at his Second, the eradication of slavery would be imminent. What events led to the Emancipation Proclamation? And what would follow as Lincoln led the nation toward his “king’s cure for all the evils,” the Thirteenth Amendment? On the eve of Lincoln’s birthday, William Martin will explore Lincoln’s passage from the careful Constitutional lawyer of the First Inaugural to the almost messianic figure of the Second. An MHS Fellow,  Mr. Martin has written novels that appear on the New York Times bestsellers list, as well as scripts for television and film.

Reservations requested. Please click on the RSVP link above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0560 / education@masshist.org.

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Environmental History Seminar “To clear the herring brook": Fluvial Control, Common Rights, and Commercial Development in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, 1660-1860 12 February 2013.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Ben Cronin, University of Michigan Comment: William F. Hanna III, author of A History of Taunton, Massachusetts By examining towns of Plymouth County, particularly Pembroke and Middleboro, this project shows how ...

By examining towns of Plymouth County, particularly Pembroke and Middleboro, this project shows how political, economic, and at times military power flowed from effective control of the waterways. The shift in what might be called “water regimes” was a crucial location of what Charles Sellers has called the Market Revolution.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 16 February 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Building Closed Presidents' Day 18 February 2013.Monday, all day details
Early American History Seminar Revolutionary Ideologies and Wartime Economic Regulation 19 February 2013.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Daniel Mandell, Truman State University Comment: Brendan McConville, Boston University Rescheduled from October 30. This seminar paper will focus on the ideological ...

Rescheduled from October 30. This seminar paper will focus on the ideological elements in the conflict that emerged over wage and price regulation, as wartime debates created a conceptual gap between calls for economic equality and liberty. It is part of a larger study of the evolution of notions of equality in America.

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Proclaim Liberty banner Special Event, Member Event "Proclaim Liberty Throughout All the Land": Preview Reception 21 February 2013.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM This event is available to MHS Fellows and Members MHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special preview reception of "Proclaim Liberty Throughout ...

Proclaim Liberty bannerMHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special preview reception of "Proclaim Liberty Throughout All the Land." The evening will begin with remarks by Stephen T. Riley Librarian Peter Drummey.

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Proclaim Liberty banner Exhibitionbegins "Proclaim Liberty Throughout All the Land": Boston Abolitionists, 1831-1865 22 February 2013.Friday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM Monday through Saturday, 10 AM to 4 PM In the decades leading up to the Civil War, Boston became a center of the national antislavery ...

Proclaim Liberty bannerIn the decades leading up to the Civil War, Boston became a center of the national antislavery movement, and in 1831 William Lloyd Garrison, "all on fire" for the cause, began publication of The Liberator, the country's leading abolitionist newspaper. There was strong resistance to the radical movement, however, not only in the slaveholding South, but among Northerners' as well. The exhibition features manuscripts, photographs, artifacts—including the imposing stone for The Liberator—and portraits related to the abolitionist movement in Boston.

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Exhibition, Public Program "I Will Be Heard!" William Lloyd Garrison & the Abolitionist Movement in Boston, 1831-1865 22 February 2013.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Exhibition Spotlight Peter Drummey, Massachusetts Historical Society Librarian Peter Drummey will discuss materials in the new exhibition that illustrate the life and ...

Proclaim Liberty banner Librarian Peter Drummey will discuss materials in the new exhibition that illustrate the life and career of William Lloyd Garrison, editor of the Liberator, and a central figure in the antislavery movement in Boston.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 23 February 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar Seeing in the City: Broadway and the Culture of Vision in 19th-Century New York 26 February 2013.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required David Jaffee, Bard Graduate Center Comment: Keith Morgan, Boston University This essay will explore Broadway as the central location for many of Jaffe’s case studies of ...

This essay will explore Broadway as the central location for many of Jaffe’s case studies of cultural entrepreneurs as well as the subject and site of new ways of seeing in the city. His research includes Currier & Ives lithographs, John Rogers sculptures, E. & H. T. Anthony Stereographs, and Harper's illustrations.

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March
Teacher Workshop Writing, Reading, & Preserving Eighteenth-Century Letters (Part I) 2 March 2013.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:30PM Join us at this two-day workshop as we explore eighteenth-century letters from the collections of ...

Join us at this two-day workshop as we explore eighteenth-century letters from the collections of the Revere House and the Massachusetts Historical Society! Teachers will learn more about the importance of letters as a communication tool in the eighteenth century, as well as their importance as historical sources today. Participants can also try their hand at writing letters using eighteenth-century technology and conventions and transcribing letters written by members of the Revere and Adams families.

Participants can earn 12 PDPs by attending both days of the course and writing one lesson plan, or One Graduate Credit (equal to 22.5 PDPs) from Framingham State (credit pending) by paying an additional fee of $75 and completing a more extensive project.

Registration Fee: $80. Includes course readings, morning snacks and one lunch. To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your check (payable to the Revere House) to:19 North Sq., Boston, MA 02113.

Workshop Schedule

SATURDAY, March 2, 2013
9:00 – 4:30 Paul Revere House 19 North Square, Boston, MA 02113

Morning Sessions:
Letter-writing in the 18th century: Who wrote letters and why?

Reading Between the Lines: What do surviving Revere letters tell us about the family? Small groups work together to note information gleaned from original and transcribed Revere family letters. A short tour of the Revere House is included to see a few Revere written items on display. Staff reveal the recent discovery of a missing Revere letter, how it came to light and how it has since been conserved.

Afternoon Sessions:
Composition Workshop: Write your own 18th c. style letter by following patterns & styles noted in examples shared in the morning sessions and required reading.

Penmanship: Quill Pen Writing Workshop: Copy out your own letter with a quill pen and ink. Proper 18th c. writing style & quill pen sharpening method will be taught by R. P. Hale, calligrapher and printer extraordinaire.

SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013
9:00 – 4:30 Massachusetts Historical Society 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215

Morning Sessions
Making Sense of Manuscripts: Learn more about the challenges & rewards of working with eighteenth-century documents such as the Adams Family Papers.

Collections Tour: View examples of letters in the Massachusetts Historical Society’s extensive collections.

Afternoon Sessions:
Your turn: Try your hand at transcribing eighteenthcentury letters from the Society’s collections. After working in small groups, participants can share their own challenges and successes.

A Life in Letters: What does the correspondence between Abigail Adams and her husband and sisters tell us about life in the late eighteenth century? Participants will examine a series of letters in order to create a sketch of Adams family life at the time of the American Revolution.

For Further Information: Contact the Education Department: 617-646-0557 or education@masshist.org.

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Early American History Seminar Blood in the Water: The Pequot War, Kieft’s War, and the Contagion of Coastal Violence 5 March 2013.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Andrew Lipman, Syracuse University Comment: Katherine Grandjean, Wellesley College Recently scholars have pointed out links between the 1636-1637 Anglo-Indian conflict known as the ...

Recently scholars have pointed out links between the 1636-1637 Anglo-Indian conflict known as the "Pequot War" and the 1643-1645 Dutch-Indian conflict known as "Kieft's War." This paper unpacks the larger historiographic implications of seeing the two wars as tandem events, and viewing New England and New Netherland as part of a single contested region.

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Brown Bag Charles E. Wyzanski, Jr.: Lawyer, Judge, Public Citizen in Massachusetts and Beyond 6 March 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM Charles Wyzanski, Independent Scholar For much of the 20th century, Charles E. Wyzanski, Jr., the presenter's father, engaged the leading ...

For much of the 20th century, Charles E. Wyzanski, Jr., the presenter's father, engaged the leading individuals and intellectuals of his time and left his imprint on a surprising number of them. While a first-year law student in 1927, Wyzanski received a handwritten note from Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, in which Holmes hoped that whenever Wyzanski's work "seemed to present only mean details, he might realize that every detail has the mystery of the universe behind it and keep up [his] heart with undying faith." Wyzanski did just that until his death in 1986, influencing to a remarkable degree the legal, political, intellectual, and moral life of his times.

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Conversation, Public Program Walking the Great Beach with a Volume of the MHS "Collections" in Hand 6 March 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 PM Peter Drummey, Massachusetts Historical Society Part of "The Object of History" series In Cape Cod, Henry David Thoreau describes using an early MHS publication as a sort of ...

In Cape Cod, Henry David Thoreau describes using an early MHS publication as a sort of antiquarian travel guide -- a way of looking back on the landscape he traversed as it had been described almost 50 years earlier. What did the founders of the MHS set out to print and what have later generations made of our early publications?

The Object of History
A series of chats with MHS Librarian Peter Drummey about what documents and artifacts from the collections can tell us about the characters, events, and issues of the past, as well as the role of MHS in documenting the rich history of our state and nation.

Registration Required. Fee $25/$15 (F/M); Free for MHS Fund Giving Circle members. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0557 / education@masshist.org.

Register for all three programs in “The Object of History” series and receive a registration discount! Series fee: $60/30 (F/M); Free for MHS Fund Circle members.

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Notice MHS Closing @ 1:00 PM 8 March 2013.Friday, all day details
Teacher Workshop Writing, Reading, & Preserving Eighteenth-Century Letters (Part II) 9 March 2013.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:30PM Join us at this two-day workshop as we explore eighteenth-century letters from the collections of ...

Join us at this two-day workshop as we explore eighteenth-century letters from the collections of the Revere House and the Massachusetts Historical Society! Teachers will learn more about the importance of letters as a communication tool in the eighteenth century, as well as their importance as historical sources today. Participants can also try their hand at writing letters using eighteenth-century technology and conventions and transcribing letters written by members of the Revere and Adams families.

Participants can earn 12 PDPs by attending both days of the course and writing one lesson plan, or One Graduate Credit (equal to 22.5 PDPs) from Framingham State (credit pending) by paying an additional fee of $75 and completing a more extensive project.

Registration Fee: $80. Includes course readings, morning snacks and one lunch. To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your check (payable to the Revere House) to:19 North Sq., Boston, MA 02113 by 31 January 2013.

Workshop Schedule

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2013
9:00 – 4:30 Paul Revere House 19 North Square, Boston, MA 02113

Morning Sessions:
Letter-writing in the 18th century: Who wrote letters and why?

Reading Between the Lines: What do surviving Revere letters tell us about the family? Small groups work together to note information gleaned from original and transcribed Revere family letters. A short tour of the Revere House is included to see a few Revere written items on display. Staff reveal the recent discovery of a missing Revere letter, how it came to light and how it has since been conserved.

Afternoon Sessions:
Composition Workshop: Write your own 18th c. style letter by following patterns & styles noted in examples shared in the morning sessions and required reading.

Penmanship: Quill Pen Writing Workshop: Copy out your own letter with a quill pen and ink. Proper 18th c. writing style & quill pen sharpening method will be taught by R. P. Hale, calligrapher and printer extraordinaire.

SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013
9:00 – 4:30 Massachusetts Historical Society 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215

Morning Sessions
Making Sense of Manuscripts: Learn more about the challenges & rewards of working with eighteenth-century documents such as the Adams Family Papers.

Collections Tour: View examples of letters in the Massachusetts Historical Society’s extensive collections.

Afternoon Sessions:
Your turn: Try your hand at transcribing eighteenthcentury letters from the Society’s collections. After working in small groups, participants can share their own challenges and successes.

A Life in Letters: What does the correspondence between Abigail Adams and her husband and sisters tell us about life in the late eighteenth century? Participants will examine a series of letters in order to create a sketch of Adams family life at the time of the American Revolution.

For Further Information: Contact the Education Department: 617-646-0557 or education@masshist.org.

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Environmental History Seminar The First Local Food Movement: Elizabeth Lowell Putnam and Boston’s Campaign for Clean Milk 12 March 2013.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Sarah Sutton, Brandeis University Comment: Kendra Smith-Howard, SUNY-Albany In 1909, Elizabeth Lowell Putnam formed the Massachusetts Milk Consumers’ Association with the ...

In 1909, Elizabeth Lowell Putnam formed the Massachusetts Milk Consumers’ Association with the intent of tackling what was then known as “the milk question.” Using the MMCA as a case study, this paper argues that Boston milk reformers’ understanding of the new science of bacteriology fundamentally shaped their perceptions of the relationship between the rural environment, the food city dwellers consumed, and the health of human bodies.

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Author Talk, Public Program An Evening with Margaret Fuller in Italy 13 March 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   This event is SOLD OUT. Megan Marshall and Newpoli Part of the "New Books/New Looks: Revisiting the Past" series Prize-winning author and MHS Fellow Megan Marshall will read from Margaret Fuller: A New ...

Prize-winning author and MHS Fellow Megan Marshall will read from Margaret Fuller: A New American Life, her biography of the 19th-century heroine who spent her last years in Rome and Florence as a war correspondent covering the early stages of Italy’s Risorgimento. How should we remember this period in Fuller’s life, particularly given the scandal of her love affair with Giovanni Ossoli? Folk ensemble Newpoli will conjure the vibrant music that Fuller came to love as emblematic of Italy. Ms. Marshall is the author of The Peabody Sisters: Three Women Who Ignited American Romanticism, winner of the Francis Parkman Prize, the Mark Lynton History Prize, the Massachusetts Book Award, and a Pulitzer Prize finalist. Newpoli performs southern Italian folk music from the Middle Ages to the 19th century.

Reservations requested. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0560 / education@masshist.org.

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New Fellows and Members Reception & Tour 14 March 2013.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Special event for new MHS Fellows and Members New Fellows and Members are invited to a special reception and tour to learn more about the MHS and ...

New Fellows and Members are invited to a special reception and tour to learn more about the MHS and its collections. For more information, call 617-646-0543. RSVP required.

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Public Program, Exhibition “Our Fanaticism”: Garrison’s Antislavery Banners 15 March 2013.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM Exhibition Spotlight Anne Bentley, Massachusetts Historical Society Curator of Art Anne Bentley will examine the nature and use of our set of William Lloyd ...

Curator of Art Anne Bentley will examine the nature and use of our set of William Lloyd Garrison’s banners, displayed circa 1840s to 1850s in local fairs and demonstrations sponsored by the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 16 March 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Building Closed MHS Closed 19 March 2013.Tuesday, all day details
Immigration and Urban History Seminar Postponed: Dynamic Tensions: Charles Atlas, Immigrant Bodybuilders, and Eugenics, 1920-45 19 March 2013.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM RSVP required This event has been postponed until April 16. Dominique Padurano, Scarsdale High School Comment: Martin Summers, Boston College This paper explores the paradox of bodybuilders such as Atlas espousing eugenics principles while ...

This paper explores the paradox of bodybuilders such as Atlas espousing eugenics principles while highlighting their own allegedly innate weaknesses as a marketing strategy for their diet and exercise regimens. It also argues that both techniques functioned as assimilation strategies for the immigrant and ethnic bodybuilding community at a time when the U.S. was less than hospitable to foreigners.

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Biography Seminar Subjects in Context: The Role of Place in the Writing of Biography 21 March 2013.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM RSVP required Carla Kaplan, Diane McWhorter, and Lois Rudnick Moderator: Carol Bundy Join us for a panel discussion featuring Carla Kaplan, who will talk about her forthcoming book on ...

Join us for a panel discussion featuring Carla Kaplan, who will talk about her forthcoming book on white women in the Harlem Renaissance; Diane McWhorter, who will discuss the civil rights struggle and the growth of the military-industrial complex in postwar Alabama; and Lois Rudnick, who will reflect on Mabel Dodge Luhan and her circle of friends in New Mexico.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 23 March 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Writing with Scissors Public Program, Author Talk Writing with Scissors: 19th-Century Activists & Their Scrapbooks 27 March 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 PM Ellen Gruber Garvey, New Jersey City University Part of the "New Books/New Looks: Revisiting the Past" series Men and women 150 years ago grappled with information overload by making scrapbooks—the ...

Writing with ScissorsMen and women 150 years ago grappled with information overload by making scrapbooks—the ancestors of Google and blogging. Mark Twain and Susan B. Anthony, abolitionists and Confederates, African American janitors and farmwomen cut out and pasted down their reading. Professor Garvey will discuss these various perspectives, covered in her recent book Writing with Scissors, including the findings she uncovered while doing research at the MHS. All scrapbook makers passed along their understanding that the press was not a simple record, but a set of voices and conversations.

Reservations requested. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0560 / education@masshist.org.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 30 March 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour ...

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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More events
Forever Free: Lincoln & the Emancipation Proclamation - Open 1 January 1 January 2013.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 4:00PM this event is free Tuesday, 1 January from 12 PM to 4 PM Pen used to sign Emancipation Proclamation

Pen used to sign Emancipation ProclamationIn commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation on 1 January 1863, this exhibition features the pen Abraham Lincoln used to sign the document. Visitors can learn how the MHS acquired this extraordinary pen as well as view paintings, broadsides, engravings, and manuscripts that tell the story of how Boston celebrated Emancipation.

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Notice Galleries Open 1 January 2013.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 4:00PM

The exhibition galleries will be open 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM. 

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Lincoln in Manuscript & Artifact - Open 1 January 1 January 2013.Tuesday, 12:00PM - 4:00PM this event is free Tuesday, 1 January from 12 PM to 4 PM Bronze cast of Abraham Lincoln

Bronze cast of Abraham LincolnView documents and artifacts related to Abraham Lincoln. Featured items include Lincoln's letter to Joshua F. Speed explaining his evolving views on slavery as well as the casts of the life mask and hands of Lincoln made by Leonard Volk in the spring of 1860.

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Library Closed New Year's Day 1 January 2013.Tuesday, all day close
Public Program, Exhibition The 150th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation 1 January 2013.Tuesday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM this event is free Exhibition Spotlight Peter Drummey & Anne Bentley, Massachusetts Historical Society

When news arrived in Boston on New Year’s Day 1863 that Lincoln had signed the Emancipation Proclamation, long-planned celebrations, the largest anywhere in the United States, already were underway. MHS Librarian Peter Drummey and Curator of Art Anne Bentley will explain how this epochal event in American History became an extraordinary moment in Boston history, and how the pen Lincoln used to sign the proclamation became one of the most treasured artifacts in the MHS collection.

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Exhibition Forever Free: Lincoln & the Emancipation Proclamation 2 January 2013 to 24 May 2013 this event is free Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Pen used to sign Emancipation Proclamation

Pen used to sign Emancipation ProclamationIn commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation on 1 January 1863, this exhibition features the pen Abraham Lincoln used to sign the document. Visitors can learn how the MHS acquired this extraordinary pen as well as view paintings, broadsides, engravings, and manuscripts that tell the story of how Boston celebrated Emancipation.

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Exhibition Lincoln in Manuscript & Artifact 2 January 2013 to 24 May 2013 this event is free Monday through Saturday from 10 AM to 4 PM Bronze cast of Abraham Lincoln

Bronze cast of Abraham LincolnView documents and artifacts related to Abraham Lincoln. Featured items include Lincoln's letter to Joshua F. Speed explaining his evolving views on slavery as well as the casts of the life mask and hands of Lincoln made by Leonard Volk in the spring of 1860.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 5 January 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Brown Bag American Insides: Popular Narrative and the Historiography of Sexuality, 1675-1815 9 January 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Greta LaFleur, University of Hawai'i at Manoa close
MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 12 January 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Environmental History Seminar “Whither Have All the Forests Gone": A Case of Land Preservation in Suburban Washington 15 January 2013.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
John Spiers, Boston College Comment: James Levitt, Harvard Forest

This paper examines a frustrating question for those concerned with environmental issues: Why has land preservation been such a challenge for suburbs in the late 20th century? It considers how land preservation occurs by offering a case study of a grassroots environmental movement in Fairfax County that formed around 1970 in response to plans for a single-family residential development adjacent to the Potomac River.

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Public Program America's Second Revolution: New England, Old England, & the Civil War 19 January 2013.Saturday, 2:00PM - 3:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost Len Gougeon, University of Scranton

Why did most of Great Britain’s intellectual and artistic class sympathize with the Confederacy, either overtly or covertly, during the Civil War? This presentation examines the cultural conflict that erupted between New England poets and intellectuals and their British counterparts as a result of tensions arising out of the Civil War. Prof. Gougeon is a Distinguished University Fellow at the University of Scranton, where he teaches American literature. He is the author of Virtue’s Hero: Emerson, Antislavery, and Reform and Emerson and Eros: The Making of a Cultural Hero.

This event is co-sponsored by The New England Quarterly.

Reservations requeted. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0560 / education@masshist.org.

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Building Closed Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 21 January 2013.Monday, all day close
Biography Seminar Biographers' Round Table: A Conversation with Stacy Schiff 24 January 2013.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Stacy Schiff, Pulitizer-Prize winning author Moderator: Susan Ware

Pulitizer-Prize winning author Stacy Schiff will discuss her career as a writer and biographer in conversation with Susan Ware. 

Stacy Schiff's most recent book is Cleopatra: A Life (2010), which was named one of the New York Times Book Review's top ten books of the year.  Her previous books include A Great Improvisation: Franklin, France, and the Birth of America (2005), Vera (Mrs. Vladimir Nabakov): Portrait of a Marriage (1999), which won the Pulitizer Prize, and Saint-Exupery: A Biography (1994). 

Susan Ware is an independent scholar who specializes in twentieth-century U.S. History, women's history, and biography.  Her most recent book is Game, Set, Match: Billie Jean King and the Revolution in Women's Sports (2011).

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Public Program, Exhibition The Real Gettysburg Address 25 January 2013.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM this event is free Exhibition Spotlight Peter Drummey, Massachusetts Historical Society

Edward Everett is known to history as the “other” speaker at the commemoration of the National Cemetery at Gettysburg – the man who, by his own admission, in two hours could not accomplish what Lincoln did in two minutes. Learn more about who said what—and why—at Gettysburg, and view letters exchanged by Lincoln and Everett.

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar "Pretended love of personal liberty": Antislavery, Nativism, and Deportation Policy in Antebellum Massachusetts 29 January 2013.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Hidetaka Hirota, Boston College Comment: Lucy Salyer, University of New Hampshire

This paper explores the implementation of deportation policy during the 1850s, when anti-Irish nativism reached its zenith with the rise of nativist politicians, the Know Nothings, in state politics. In particular, it examines the contradiction between the defense of African Americans’ personal liberty and the seizure of Irish immigrants by exposing the tangible presence of nativist force in the antislavery movement.

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Conversation, Public Program Dumb Witnesses: Relics of George Washington at the Massachusetts Historical Society 30 January 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 PM Peter Drummey, Massachusetts Historical Society Part of "The Object of History" series

From the beginnings of the MHS, George Washington has been the subject of fascination and veneration. What does the Society’s early collection of Washington artifacts and documents say about the founding of the MHS—and the image of Washington in the early Republic?

The Object of History
A series of chats with MHS Librarian Peter Drummey about what documents and artifacts from the collections can tell us about the characters, events, and issues of the past, as well as the role of MHS in documenting the rich history of our state and nation.

Registration Required. Fee $25/$15 (F/M); Free for MHS Fund Giving Circle members. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0557 / education@masshist.org.

Register for all three programs in “The Object of History” series and receive a registration discount! Series fee: $60/30 (F/M); Free for MHS Fund Circle members.

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Exhibition In Death Lamented: The Tradition of Anglo-American Mourning Jewelry 31 January 2013.Thursday, 10:00AM - 4:00PM this event is free Monday through Saturday, 10 AM to 4 PM In Death Lamented

In Death LamentedIn Death Lamented features rings, bracelets, brooches, and other pieces of mourning jewelry from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, ranging from early gold bands with death’s head iconography to jeweled brooches and intricately woven hairwork pieces of the Civil War era. These elegant and evocative objects are presented in the context of their history, use, and meaning, alongside related pieces of material culture.

Drawn from the collections of the MHS and Guest Curator Sarah Nehama as well as loans from the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Historic New England in Boston, and the Adams National Historical Park in Quincy, exhibition highlights include the Adams-Winthrop commemorative seal ring containing the braided hair of John Quincy Adams and a gold memorial ring for Queen Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach.

A full-color companion book, In Death Lamented: The Tradition of Anglo-American Mourning Jewelry, available for sale at the MHS, features photographs and descriptions of all of the Nehama and MHS pieces, along with historical and stylistic backgrounds and essays pertaining to cultural practices around death and mourning in England and America.

View a selection of mourning jewelry at www.masshist.org/features/mourning-jewelry.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 2 February 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Early American History Seminar Panel Discussion: Race, Religion, and Freedom in the 18th Century North 5 February 2013.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Location: Old State House Richard Boles, George Washington University, and Jared Hardesty, Boston College Comment: Linford Fisher, Brown University

Discussion will focus on two seminar papers: “African American and Indian Church Affiliation: Reevaluating Race and Religion in the North, 1730-1776,” by Richard Boles of George Washington University, and  “A World of Deference and Dependence: Slavery and Unfreedom in Eighteenth-century Boston,” by Jared Hardesty of Boston College. Boles’s paper explores black and Indian participation in each major Protestant denomination, suggesting the need to reevaluate aspects of the religious history of the colonial North in regard to how blacks and Indians influenced theology and church practices. Hardesty’s essay aims to raise serious questions about the nature of freedom in the American Colonies by engaging the literature concerning liberty in early America and challenging the popular slave/free dichotomy that dominates the historiography.

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Brown Bag Finding Sedgwick In the Archives: Recent Discoveries in the Complex Life of Catharine Maria Sedgwick (1789-1867) 6 February 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Lucinda Damon-Bach, Salem State University

Internationally famous author, pioneering Unitarian, rural and urban benevolent worker, sister to six siblings, active aunt to 37 nieces and nephews, and prolific correspondent, Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s fascinating life deserves a full-length biography. With over 4,000 letters in addition to personal journals at the MHS, there is much to examine. In her brown bag talk Lucinda Damon-Bach will share some of the questions and discoveries to date that are helping her to clear up misconceptions and prepare a long-overdue book about Sedgwick’s life and work.

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History of Women and Gender Seminar Partus Sequitur Ventrem: Slave Law and the History of Women in Slavery 7 February 2013.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Location: Schlesinger Library Jennifer Morgan, New York University Comment: Linda Heywood, Boston University close
Building Closed Library & Exhibitions Closing @ 12:30 8 February 2013.Friday, all day close
Building Closed Library & Exhibitions Closed 9 February 2013.Saturday, all day close
Notice Opening @ Noon 11 February 2013.Monday, all day close
Author Talk, Public Program Lincoln & Liberty, Too 11 February 2013.Monday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 PM William Martin

William Martin The Lincoln LetterIn March 1861, when Lincoln delivered his First Inaugural, neither he nor many in the audience envisioned that four years later, at his Second, the eradication of slavery would be imminent. What events led to the Emancipation Proclamation? And what would follow as Lincoln led the nation toward his “king’s cure for all the evils,” the Thirteenth Amendment? On the eve of Lincoln’s birthday, William Martin will explore Lincoln’s passage from the careful Constitutional lawyer of the First Inaugural to the almost messianic figure of the Second. An MHS Fellow,  Mr. Martin has written novels that appear on the New York Times bestsellers list, as well as scripts for television and film.

Reservations requested. Please click on the RSVP link above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0560 / education@masshist.org.

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Environmental History Seminar “To clear the herring brook": Fluvial Control, Common Rights, and Commercial Development in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, 1660-1860 12 February 2013.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Ben Cronin, University of Michigan Comment: William F. Hanna III, author of A History of Taunton, Massachusetts

By examining towns of Plymouth County, particularly Pembroke and Middleboro, this project shows how political, economic, and at times military power flowed from effective control of the waterways. The shift in what might be called “water regimes” was a crucial location of what Charles Sellers has called the Market Revolution.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 16 February 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Building Closed Presidents' Day 18 February 2013.Monday, all day close
Early American History Seminar Revolutionary Ideologies and Wartime Economic Regulation 19 February 2013.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Daniel Mandell, Truman State University Comment: Brendan McConville, Boston University

Rescheduled from October 30. This seminar paper will focus on the ideological elements in the conflict that emerged over wage and price regulation, as wartime debates created a conceptual gap between calls for economic equality and liberty. It is part of a larger study of the evolution of notions of equality in America.

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Special Event, Member Event "Proclaim Liberty Throughout All the Land": Preview Reception 21 February 2013.Thursday, 6:00PM - 8:00PM registration required at no cost This event is available to MHS Fellows and Members Proclaim Liberty banner

Proclaim Liberty bannerMHS Fellows and Members are invited to a special preview reception of "Proclaim Liberty Throughout All the Land." The evening will begin with remarks by Stephen T. Riley Librarian Peter Drummey.

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Exhibition "Proclaim Liberty Throughout All the Land": Boston Abolitionists, 1831-1865 22 February 2013 to 24 May 2013 this event is free Monday through Saturday, 10 AM to 4 PM Proclaim Liberty banner

Proclaim Liberty bannerIn the decades leading up to the Civil War, Boston became a center of the national antislavery movement, and in 1831 William Lloyd Garrison, "all on fire" for the cause, began publication of The Liberator, the country's leading abolitionist newspaper. There was strong resistance to the radical movement, however, not only in the slaveholding South, but among Northerners' as well. The exhibition features manuscripts, photographs, artifacts—including the imposing stone for The Liberator—and portraits related to the abolitionist movement in Boston.

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Exhibition, Public Program "I Will Be Heard!" William Lloyd Garrison & the Abolitionist Movement in Boston, 1831-1865 22 February 2013.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM this event is free Exhibition Spotlight Peter Drummey, Massachusetts Historical Society

Proclaim Liberty banner Librarian Peter Drummey will discuss materials in the new exhibition that illustrate the life and career of William Lloyd Garrison, editor of the Liberator, and a central figure in the antislavery movement in Boston.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 23 February 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Immigration and Urban History Seminar Seeing in the City: Broadway and the Culture of Vision in 19th-Century New York 26 February 2013.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
David Jaffee, Bard Graduate Center Comment: Keith Morgan, Boston University

This essay will explore Broadway as the central location for many of Jaffe’s case studies of cultural entrepreneurs as well as the subject and site of new ways of seeing in the city. His research includes Currier & Ives lithographs, John Rogers sculptures, E. & H. T. Anthony Stereographs, and Harper's illustrations.

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Teacher Workshop Writing, Reading, & Preserving Eighteenth-Century Letters (Part I) 2 March 2013.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:30PM registration required

Join us at this two-day workshop as we explore eighteenth-century letters from the collections of the Revere House and the Massachusetts Historical Society! Teachers will learn more about the importance of letters as a communication tool in the eighteenth century, as well as their importance as historical sources today. Participants can also try their hand at writing letters using eighteenth-century technology and conventions and transcribing letters written by members of the Revere and Adams families.

Participants can earn 12 PDPs by attending both days of the course and writing one lesson plan, or One Graduate Credit (equal to 22.5 PDPs) from Framingham State (credit pending) by paying an additional fee of $75 and completing a more extensive project.

Registration Fee: $80. Includes course readings, morning snacks and one lunch. To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your check (payable to the Revere House) to:19 North Sq., Boston, MA 02113.

Workshop Schedule

SATURDAY, March 2, 2013
9:00 – 4:30 Paul Revere House 19 North Square, Boston, MA 02113

Morning Sessions:
Letter-writing in the 18th century: Who wrote letters and why?

Reading Between the Lines: What do surviving Revere letters tell us about the family? Small groups work together to note information gleaned from original and transcribed Revere family letters. A short tour of the Revere House is included to see a few Revere written items on display. Staff reveal the recent discovery of a missing Revere letter, how it came to light and how it has since been conserved.

Afternoon Sessions:
Composition Workshop: Write your own 18th c. style letter by following patterns & styles noted in examples shared in the morning sessions and required reading.

Penmanship: Quill Pen Writing Workshop: Copy out your own letter with a quill pen and ink. Proper 18th c. writing style & quill pen sharpening method will be taught by R. P. Hale, calligrapher and printer extraordinaire.

SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013
9:00 – 4:30 Massachusetts Historical Society 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215

Morning Sessions
Making Sense of Manuscripts: Learn more about the challenges & rewards of working with eighteenth-century documents such as the Adams Family Papers.

Collections Tour: View examples of letters in the Massachusetts Historical Society’s extensive collections.

Afternoon Sessions:
Your turn: Try your hand at transcribing eighteenthcentury letters from the Society’s collections. After working in small groups, participants can share their own challenges and successes.

A Life in Letters: What does the correspondence between Abigail Adams and her husband and sisters tell us about life in the late eighteenth century? Participants will examine a series of letters in order to create a sketch of Adams family life at the time of the American Revolution.

For Further Information: Contact the Education Department: 617-646-0557 or education@masshist.org.

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Early American History Seminar Blood in the Water: The Pequot War, Kieft’s War, and the Contagion of Coastal Violence 5 March 2013.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Andrew Lipman, Syracuse University Comment: Katherine Grandjean, Wellesley College

Recently scholars have pointed out links between the 1636-1637 Anglo-Indian conflict known as the "Pequot War" and the 1643-1645 Dutch-Indian conflict known as "Kieft's War." This paper unpacks the larger historiographic implications of seeing the two wars as tandem events, and viewing New England and New Netherland as part of a single contested region.

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Brown Bag Charles E. Wyzanski, Jr.: Lawyer, Judge, Public Citizen in Massachusetts and Beyond 6 March 2013.Wednesday, 12:00PM - 1:00PM this event is free Charles Wyzanski, Independent Scholar

For much of the 20th century, Charles E. Wyzanski, Jr., the presenter's father, engaged the leading individuals and intellectuals of his time and left his imprint on a surprising number of them. While a first-year law student in 1927, Wyzanski received a handwritten note from Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, in which Holmes hoped that whenever Wyzanski's work "seemed to present only mean details, he might realize that every detail has the mystery of the universe behind it and keep up [his] heart with undying faith." Wyzanski did just that until his death in 1986, influencing to a remarkable degree the legal, political, intellectual, and moral life of his times.

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Conversation, Public Program Walking the Great Beach with a Volume of the MHS "Collections" in Hand 6 March 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 PM Peter Drummey, Massachusetts Historical Society Part of "The Object of History" series

In Cape Cod, Henry David Thoreau describes using an early MHS publication as a sort of antiquarian travel guide -- a way of looking back on the landscape he traversed as it had been described almost 50 years earlier. What did the founders of the MHS set out to print and what have later generations made of our early publications?

The Object of History
A series of chats with MHS Librarian Peter Drummey about what documents and artifacts from the collections can tell us about the characters, events, and issues of the past, as well as the role of MHS in documenting the rich history of our state and nation.

Registration Required. Fee $25/$15 (F/M); Free for MHS Fund Giving Circle members. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0557 / education@masshist.org.

Register for all three programs in “The Object of History” series and receive a registration discount! Series fee: $60/30 (F/M); Free for MHS Fund Circle members.

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Notice MHS Closing @ 1:00 PM 8 March 2013.Friday, all day close
Teacher Workshop Writing, Reading, & Preserving Eighteenth-Century Letters (Part II) 9 March 2013.Saturday, 9:00AM - 4:30PM registration required

Join us at this two-day workshop as we explore eighteenth-century letters from the collections of the Revere House and the Massachusetts Historical Society! Teachers will learn more about the importance of letters as a communication tool in the eighteenth century, as well as their importance as historical sources today. Participants can also try their hand at writing letters using eighteenth-century technology and conventions and transcribing letters written by members of the Revere and Adams families.

Participants can earn 12 PDPs by attending both days of the course and writing one lesson plan, or One Graduate Credit (equal to 22.5 PDPs) from Framingham State (credit pending) by paying an additional fee of $75 and completing a more extensive project.

Registration Fee: $80. Includes course readings, morning snacks and one lunch. To Register: Please complete this registration form and send it with your check (payable to the Revere House) to:19 North Sq., Boston, MA 02113 by 31 January 2013.

Workshop Schedule

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2013
9:00 – 4:30 Paul Revere House 19 North Square, Boston, MA 02113

Morning Sessions:
Letter-writing in the 18th century: Who wrote letters and why?

Reading Between the Lines: What do surviving Revere letters tell us about the family? Small groups work together to note information gleaned from original and transcribed Revere family letters. A short tour of the Revere House is included to see a few Revere written items on display. Staff reveal the recent discovery of a missing Revere letter, how it came to light and how it has since been conserved.

Afternoon Sessions:
Composition Workshop: Write your own 18th c. style letter by following patterns & styles noted in examples shared in the morning sessions and required reading.

Penmanship: Quill Pen Writing Workshop: Copy out your own letter with a quill pen and ink. Proper 18th c. writing style & quill pen sharpening method will be taught by R. P. Hale, calligrapher and printer extraordinaire.

SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013
9:00 – 4:30 Massachusetts Historical Society 1154 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215

Morning Sessions
Making Sense of Manuscripts: Learn more about the challenges & rewards of working with eighteenth-century documents such as the Adams Family Papers.

Collections Tour: View examples of letters in the Massachusetts Historical Society’s extensive collections.

Afternoon Sessions:
Your turn: Try your hand at transcribing eighteenthcentury letters from the Society’s collections. After working in small groups, participants can share their own challenges and successes.

A Life in Letters: What does the correspondence between Abigail Adams and her husband and sisters tell us about life in the late eighteenth century? Participants will examine a series of letters in order to create a sketch of Adams family life at the time of the American Revolution.

For Further Information: Contact the Education Department: 617-646-0557 or education@masshist.org.

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Environmental History Seminar The First Local Food Movement: Elizabeth Lowell Putnam and Boston’s Campaign for Clean Milk 12 March 2013.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Sarah Sutton, Brandeis University Comment: Kendra Smith-Howard, SUNY-Albany

In 1909, Elizabeth Lowell Putnam formed the Massachusetts Milk Consumers’ Association with the intent of tackling what was then known as “the milk question.” Using the MMCA as a case study, this paper argues that Boston milk reformers’ understanding of the new science of bacteriology fundamentally shaped their perceptions of the relationship between the rural environment, the food city dwellers consumed, and the health of human bodies.

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Author Talk, Public Program An Evening with Margaret Fuller in Italy 13 March 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP  registration closed This event is SOLD OUT. Megan Marshall and Newpoli Part of the "New Books/New Looks: Revisiting the Past" series

Prize-winning author and MHS Fellow Megan Marshall will read from Margaret Fuller: A New American Life, her biography of the 19th-century heroine who spent her last years in Rome and Florence as a war correspondent covering the early stages of Italy’s Risorgimento. How should we remember this period in Fuller’s life, particularly given the scandal of her love affair with Giovanni Ossoli? Folk ensemble Newpoli will conjure the vibrant music that Fuller came to love as emblematic of Italy. Ms. Marshall is the author of The Peabody Sisters: Three Women Who Ignited American Romanticism, winner of the Francis Parkman Prize, the Mark Lynton History Prize, the Massachusetts Book Award, and a Pulitzer Prize finalist. Newpoli performs southern Italian folk music from the Middle Ages to the 19th century.

Reservations requested. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0560 / education@masshist.org.

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New Fellows and Members Reception & Tour 14 March 2013.Thursday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM registration required at no cost Special event for new MHS Fellows and Members

New Fellows and Members are invited to a special reception and tour to learn more about the MHS and its collections. For more information, call 617-646-0543. RSVP required.

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Public Program, Exhibition “Our Fanaticism”: Garrison’s Antislavery Banners 15 March 2013.Friday, 2:00PM - 3:00PM this event is free Exhibition Spotlight Anne Bentley, Massachusetts Historical Society

Curator of Art Anne Bentley will examine the nature and use of our set of William Lloyd Garrison’s banners, displayed circa 1840s to 1850s in local fairs and demonstrations sponsored by the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 16 March 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Building Closed MHS Closed 19 March 2013.Tuesday, all day close
Immigration and Urban History Seminar Postponed:
Dynamic Tensions: Charles Atlas, Immigrant Bodybuilders, and Eugenics, 1920-45
19 March 2013.Tuesday, 5:15PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
This event has been postponed until April 16. Dominique Padurano, Scarsdale High School Comment: Martin Summers, Boston College

This paper explores the paradox of bodybuilders such as Atlas espousing eugenics principles while highlighting their own allegedly innate weaknesses as a marketing strategy for their diet and exercise regimens. It also argues that both techniques functioned as assimilation strategies for the immigrant and ethnic bodybuilding community at a time when the U.S. was less than hospitable to foreigners.

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Biography Seminar Subjects in Context: The Role of Place in the Writing of Biography 21 March 2013.Thursday, 5:30PM - 7:30PM Seminars are free and open to the public; RSVP required.
Subscribe to received advance copies of the seminar papers.
Carla Kaplan, Diane McWhorter, and Lois Rudnick Moderator: Carol Bundy

Join us for a panel discussion featuring Carla Kaplan, who will talk about her forthcoming book on white women in the Harlem Renaissance; Diane McWhorter, who will discuss the civil rights struggle and the growth of the military-industrial complex in postwar Alabama; and Lois Rudnick, who will reflect on Mabel Dodge Luhan and her circle of friends in New Mexico.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 23 March 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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Public Program, Author Talk Writing with Scissors: 19th-Century Activists & Their Scrapbooks 27 March 2013.Wednesday, 6:00PM - 7:30PM Please RSVP   registration required at no cost Pre-Talk Reception at 5:30 PM Ellen Gruber Garvey, New Jersey City University Part of the "New Books/New Looks: Revisiting the Past" series Writing with Scissors

Writing with ScissorsMen and women 150 years ago grappled with information overload by making scrapbooks—the ancestors of Google and blogging. Mark Twain and Susan B. Anthony, abolitionists and Confederates, African American janitors and farmwomen cut out and pasted down their reading. Professor Garvey will discuss these various perspectives, covered in her recent book Writing with Scissors, including the findings she uncovered while doing research at the MHS. All scrapbook makers passed along their understanding that the press was not a simple record, but a set of voices and conversations.

Reservations requested. Please click on the ticket icon above, or contact the education department at 617-646-0560 / education@masshist.org.

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MHS Tour MHS Tour: The History and Collections of the MHS 30 March 2013.Saturday, 10:00AM - 11:30AM this event is free

Join us for a tour of the Society's public rooms. Led by an MHS staff member or docent, the tour touches on the history and collections of the MHS and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

The tour is free and open to the public. No reservation is required for individuals or small groups. Parties of 8 or more should contact the MHS prior to attending a tour. For more information please contact Curator of Art Anne Bentley at 617-646-0508 or abentley@masshist.org.

Free and open to the public.

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